biscuit

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

Can I tell you something without receiving the full weight of your judgment? I love fast food. Like, love it. Yes, I adore fancy pants restaurants and made-from-scratch comfort favorites from my own kitchen. I appreciate the slow food movement and eating local and all that jazz. But sometimes fast food just hits the spot, ya know? Give me curly fries or secret sauce or a Chick-Fil-A sandwich basically any day of the week. Maybe it’s because I grew up on food from a brown bag or maybe it’s just because greasy gut bombs hit the spot, but no matter the reason, fast food will always have a place in my food pyramid. Case in point: these cinnamon raisin biscuits. Have you had those buttery beauties from Hardee’s? They are AWESOME. Consider this rendition of those drive-thru faves a homemade ode to the glory that is a fast food breakfast. Let me tell you how to make them.

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

These cinnamon raisin biscuits start like my favorite chocolate chip biscuits. We stir together the dry ingredients of flour, sugar, leavening and salt, and cut in the fat. Unlike my traditional buttermilk biscuits, these contain a bit of cream cheese which help to keep the pastry tender. Next, we stir in the raisins and bring the dough together with buttermilk. For flaky, pull-apart layered biscuits, we use a folding technique and sprinkle a bit of cinnamon sugar inside the folds so that there is a swirl of spice throughout the biscuits. Finally, the rounds of dough are baked in the oven until golden, and each one is topped with a simple sugar glaze.

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

These cinnamon raisin biscuits are best eaten the day they’re made, but I’ve had terrific luck reheating them in the toaster oven. If you’re wanting to make them in advance, leave them unglazed so that you can rewarm without making all of the icing run off. I haven’t tried freezer or prepping the dough ahead of time, but I suspect it will work. Who wants to try it out?

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Friday to you all and take care! Share a batch of these biscuits with someone you love and enjoy something that makes your heart full this weekend. See you next week and happy baking!

If you like these cinnamon raisin biscuits you should try:

Raisin Swirl Bread
Cinnamon Swirl Scones
Breakfast Danish
Honey Nut Biscuits
Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

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Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits

Cinnamon Raisin Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are layered Southern style buttermilk biscuits with a cinnamon sugar filling and raisins. A copycat recipe of Hardee's biscuits! The butter glaze is simple and adds extra sweet to these breakfast pastries. These fluffy biscuits make a great breakfast or brunch option and reheat well so you can make in advance as well. Find the recipe and how to for making tall flaky biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com

These cinnamon raisin biscuits have a swirl layered throughout and a sweet butter glaze on top. Serve warm for a flaky Southern-style treat!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the biscuits:

  • 2 cups (280 gm) all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter, cold
  • 2/3 cup cold buttermilk
  • ½ cup raisins

For the filling:

  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

For the topping:

  • 2 tablespoons salted butter, melted
  • 11/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons milk

Instructions

To make the biscuits:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Use the back of a fork or a pastry cutter to cut in the cream cheese and butter until large, pea-sized clumps exist throughout. Stir in raisins and then add the buttermilk, stirring to combine. Dump the shaggy dough out onto a floured surface and used floured hands to gently pat the dough out into a 1” rectangle. Fold the dough in thirds like a letter and then pat it out again into 1” thickness. Combine the sugar and the cinnamon for the filling and sprinkle half of it on the dough. Fold the dough in thirds again and sprinkle more filling. Fold once more and then pat the dough out into a 1” thick rectangle. Use a 2” biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Gently combine the scraps and then pat out that mixture to 1” thick again. Cut out additional rounds. Space the rounds out on a cookie sheet and bake for about 18 minutes or until the tops are puffed and turning almost golden. You may need to rotate the pan towards the end of baking if one size is darkening faster than the other. Allow the biscuits to cool briefly while you prepare the topping.

To prepare the topping:

  1. Whisk together the ingredients in a small bowl. Rewarm as needed and add a tablespoon or more or milk to get the icing a smooth, spreadable consistency. Smooth a dollop on each biscuit and serve immediately! Biscuits are best eaten on day one and served warm.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Today’s post is all about a summertime staple that should make your life easier. With so much going on, I think we should simplify these summer days so that we can spend a little more time actually enjoying them. If you’re up for taking a load off your proverbial plate in a beautiful and delicious way, look no further than this stone fruit skillet cobbler.

For starters, I just want to say “LOL” to the summer. It wasn’t long ago that the term “summer break” induced visions of binge-watching “Full House” and drinking Diet Cokes by the pool with my friends. Summer used to be primarily about tan lines and an extended curfew, those days when the biggest concern to be had was whether or not that bottle of Nair would destroy your bikini area. Let’s just have a moment of silence for the easy days of our youth, shall we?

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Of course in adulthood that reality changes as work schedules and managers and deadlines really don’t take a break. Even then, it’s easy to take the occasional long weekend or beachside snooze because you are on your own schedule. Instead, for me, it took having kids to remember that summer is no longer about beach lounging and googling things like, “where is Johnathan Taylor Thomas after Home Improvement,” because now you’re on kid schedule, and let me tell you- kid schedule is way more complicated. 

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Let’s say you have a couple of hours to kill and you want to take your kids to the pool. Once you factor in time for applying sunscreen, feeding them snacks, trips to timeout for stealing someone else’s diving rings, and then reapplying sunscreen, your time spent swimming is actually, well, none. This is also assuming that the trip wasn’t cut short at the hands of a diaper explosion or a sunscreen-in-the-eyes meltdown. If so, factor in a deficit of thirty minutes for time spent in that disgustingly wet public bathroom. RIP your daily morale.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Or let’s say you want to have an afternoon picnic, get out of the house for some exercise. If so, I sincerely hope you live somewhere north of the Mason/Dixon line or have chosen a cloudy day for this adventure, because your kid will not be having it. They’re going to be hot! They’ll be sweaty! Their legs will hurt, they’ll need some ice water, they’ll want to go home to collect 103 very important items that they left behind. Summer adventures with kids, in my experience, turn into misadventures, so just don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Lest you feel discouraged at the outlook of summers with kids, let me say that I do think this will all end up being worth it. The opportunity to watch those littles experience the freedom and newness of each summer for the first time makes for a memorable experience. I’m going to keep taking photos and biting my tongue when I want to freak out because there is sweetness in this season, even if it is in the midst of a little stress. And in the meantime, I’m working to scale back in other ways, a de-clutter of my to-do list, so that I can really try to focus on enjoying the moment I’m in, ya know? 

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

First up is this stone fruit skillet cobbler. This is an adaptable recipe that you can modify to fit whatever fruit you pick up at the farmers market or find lying in the nether regions of your freezer. You can make the dough for the biscuity/scone-like topping a few hours, days, whatever in advance and plop it on your fruit filling when the craving hits. The topping here is a combination of my favorite scone and my biscuit recipe. It’s tender, almost cakey, but super delicious in flavor. In place of some of the flour, I’ve added cornmeal for texture and to compliment the sweet fruit. When baked, this topping has crisp, buttery edges and a soft biscuit-like center that goes splendidly with a juicy fruit filling.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

I opted to use peaches, cherries, and plums for this particular stone fruit skillet cobbler, but you can really use whatever fruit you have on hand! The most important part is making sure to add the right amount of sugar. If you’re working with super sweet fruit, like strawberries, figs, or blueberries, you will likely require less sugar to add to the filling. In my case, the addition of tart plums required a smidge more sugar, so just be sure to adjust the recipe by a tablespoon or two as needed. I love to take whatever fruit is threatening to die in my fridge and throw it in mini, ramekin-sized portions for individuals treats as well. Just make sure your baking container is large enough to avoid an overflow of fruit syrup burning on the bottom of your oven. I learned this the hard way.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Moms, I’m giving you a badge of courage for taking these summer days in stride. As a reward, enjoy this stone fruit skillet cobbler and just give yourself a pat on the back for being freaking awesome, okay? Happy baking, y’all!

If you like this stone fruit skillet cobbler you should check out:

Cherry Gateau Basque 

Cherry Lime Hand Pies

Peach Berry Pie

Peach Crumb Muffins

Chocolate Budino

 

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Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

This stone fruit skillet cobbler is a simple way to use up fresh summer produce and can be easily adapted for a variety of your favorites!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 6 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the filling:

  • Two pounds of cored stone fruit (peaches, plums, nectarines, cherries, etc)
  • About ½1 cup (100 gm-200 gm) sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt

For the topping:

  • 3/4 cup (105 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons cornmeal
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 11/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 5 tablespoons (70 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • ½ cup (120 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • Extract sugar for sprinkling
  • Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Instructions

To prepare the cobbler:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 and prep the filling. Core and chop fruit into 1/2” pieces and be sure that any peaches have been peeled. You can keep the skin on plums, cherries, and nectarines. Toss the fruit with the remaining filling ingredients and sugar to taste. I like to start with ½ cup sugar for ripe, sweet fruit. If you’re using any tart or not fully ripened fruit, you’ll likely need about ¾ cup of sugar instead. Only add the full cup of sugar for really sour fruit. Dump the fruit mixture into a 1-1/2 quart baking dish and set aside while you prep the topping.
  2. Combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Use a pastry cutter or the backs of two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until pea-sized clumps form. Add the heavy whipping cream and stir together until a dry dough comes together. Use a medium cookie scoop or your hands to make little flat rounds of dough to place directly on top of the fruit in the baking dish. Sprinkle with a little extract sugar and baking in the preheat oven for about 35 minutes, or until the topping is golden and the fruit underneath is bubbling. Allow to cool slightly before serving with a scoop of ice cream.

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Our weekends deserve new life, don’t you think? I say we find a reason to get excited about the mornings again- something to pair with that strong cup of coffee and cream. These maple oatmeal biscuits are weekend warriors, making a delicious statement every time they emerge from the oven. If you’re as into making weekends great again as I am, let’s just agree to start here.

I can remember the days when weekends were saving grace. Monday and Tuesday would thunder into Friday with an onslaught of assignments and tests and premature gray hairs. Grades and deadlines loomed around every corner, so the primary sanctuary from the stress of school were those bookend days of the week. There’s not a teenager alive who doesn’t wait for the weekends with the same anticipation as they do the recess bell. It’s just science.Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

But in adulthood, Saturday and Sunday don’t care. It doesn’t matter that you worked hard all week or that you’re desperate for a break. The weekend isn’t impressed by what you accomplished Monday through Friday because there are groceries to buy, lawns to mow, and cars to clean. Adulthood takes hostage those few hours of weekend solace and ransoms them for nine bags of raked leaves, an unloaded dishwasher, and few hours worth of ironing. It’s savage.

You notice I haven’t even mentioned children yet. In the BC years (that’s the “before children” years), weekends might have at least included thirty extra minutes for a second cup of coffee. There would be time for blown-dry hair and a pre-dinner cocktail, maybe even an hour for catching up on your DVR. Let’s pour one out in remembrance, shall we?

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comWeekends with kids are a different animal. There are bottles to warm and sippy cups to refill. Kids are not concerned about you reading the paper because kids want their Cheerios. Kids want to go to the park. Kids want to remove all of the plastic cups from the cupboard, litter them throughout the house, and then poop their pants while you’re in the middle of cleaning it all up. 

My kids like to spend the weekends begging for junk food and television. Saturday is their favorite day to to skip naps and pee in their shoes. On the weekends, you’ll find my kids stealing television remotes and car keys, hiding them in places Dad is sure to never find them (read: the toilet; see also: the trash can.) 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comI have this dream where I wake up on a Saturday after seven o’clock. Alas, my family is all awake, and they have been patiently waiting for me to wake up. They teeter into my room with a warm coffee and breakfast tray in tow, complete with warm maple oatmeal biscuits and extra butter to boot. (Remember, I said this was a dream.)

These maple oatmeal biscuits might save your weekend. They won’t change a fifteenth diaper or freshen up a gone-cold mug of coffee, but they are good enough to add some luster to the weekend. A one-bowl dish that freezes like magic and reheats like a dream, these maple oatmeal biscuits are the rising star of the weekend, and you need them in your life. 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

We start by tossing together a few dry ingredients- flour, sugar, the usual suspects. Oats are next, which account for the extra fluffy, slightly nutty flavor that we wind up with once the maple oatmeal biscuits have baked. Ice cold butter is incorporated throughout before the dairy and a heavy-handed pour of maple syrup brings the dough together. 

For the best success with these maple oatmeal biscuits, work quickly  to ensure that they enter the oven with chunks of chilled butter throughout. Handle the dough as little as possible so that they stay airy and fluffy, and use a floured cutter to trim out rounds, pressing straight down without any twist. I like to brush my biscuit tops with a little extra cream or butter for browning, but I think a simple painting of maple syrup would be perfectly sufficient here as well. You decide.

I think we should bake back the wonder into our weekends. Make these maple oatmeal biscuits as a means of celebrating the good Saturday and Sunday have to offer, and I promise you that things will start looking up. Happy week to you all!

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these maple oatmeal biscuits, you should check out:

Buttermilk Biscuits

Honey Nut Biscuits

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Peach Crumb Muffins

 

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Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These maple oatmeal biscuits are soft, layered, Southern-style biscuits sweetened with maple syrup. Perfect for breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the biscuits:

  • 3 cups (390 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup (50 gm) brown sugar, packed
  • 21/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 cup (90 gm) old fashioned oats
  • 11 tablespoons (155 gm) butter, cold and diced into tablespoon-sized chunks
  • 1 cup (240 mL) milk (whole or 2%)
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) maple syrup

For topping:

  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 415 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper.
  2. Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Stir in the oats. Use a pastry cutter or the back of a fork to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it is reduced to pea-sized clumps.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the milk and maple syrup. Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients and butter and fold just until combined.
  4. Turn the mixture out onto a floured surface. Gently pat together, but be careful not to overwork. Pat out to 1” thickness and then fold in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and then repeat this patting and folding process. Repeat once more for a total of 3 sets of folds. Pat the dough out to 1” thickness and use a floured biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Gently pat together the remnants and cut out more biscuits.
  5. Combine the melted butter and remaining maple syrup together and brush over the tops of the biscuits. Bake in the preheated oven for about 12-15 minutes, or until the tops are golden brown.

Notes

  • Be sure to use very cold butter and milk. Butter and milk that is not cold enough can prevent your biscuits from rising well.
  • Do not overwork your dough at any phase of the preparation.
  • The folding of the dough helps to create flaky layers within the biscuit, but is not necessary if you don’t care about this.
  • For flakiest layers, use a sharp biscuit cutters and push straight down into the dough. Refrain from twisting the cutter as you insert it into the dough as this can cause the edges to seal off and keep from rising well.
  • To reheat biscuits, toast in a toaster oven until fragrant.