cream cheese

Cranberry Kolaches

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

People ask me all the time if I ever have any kitchen failures. Let’s just LOL at that one. As with anything, particularly a craft that is heavily dependent on time, temperature, ingredients, skill, measurements, and, oh yeah, SCIENCE, baking is one of those things that just comes with a mixed bag of results. Some recipes are a win, an instant classic, while others require a million tries. Anytime I step into the kitchen, I’m expecting (read: hoping and praying for) great results, but there’s absolutely zero guarantees. Baking mishaps are a real thing.

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

I set out to make these cranberry kolaches after seeing seeing them freckled about the internet over the past few months. For some time, it seemed as if these European-born pastries were on their way to stardom, and I was bound and determined to wrangle a recipe I could be proud to share on this website. It couldn’t be that hard, right? After all, I’ve made babka! Brioche! The 17-try swirl bread! Cranberry kolaches were bound to be a walk in the park, right?

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

Wrong. After months of cranking out pies and cakes and cookies, my yeasted dough know-how was rusty. I had to revisit this recipe a number of times before I felt like I could make them without the slightest bit of anxiety or kitchen fury, but finally, I landed on something that is really quite delicious. These cranberry kolaches are sweet and tender goodies for the morning hour, and because I logged the man hours on the backend, you get to try these pastries with confidence! Let’s talk about how to make them.

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

The dough for these cranberry kolaches is adapted from my favorite cinnamon bread. Sweet and rich from the addition of sugar, butter, and egg, the dough comes together with milk, activated yeast, and loads of flour. After some time spent rising, small rounds of dough are pinched down and filled with your choice of fillings. First, a fresh cranberry option, tart and only barely sweet, is made on the stovetop with cinnamon and barely-burst berries. Second, a cream cheese and egg-based filling that is subtle in flavor but seriously delish. I personally prefer a combination of the two, but you can bake and fill with whichever you prefer. Finally, to finish off the cranberry kolaches, we sprinkle on a simple crumb made from flour and granulated sugar. The mixture bakes on the pastries for an extra hint of sweet and a bit of texture. They’re divine!

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

As with any of the refined baked good I opt to make, these cranberry kolaches were made with Kerrygold butter. The dough’s intense richness is 100% thanks to the helping of butter found throughout it, and I was incredibly pleased to see how much buttery flavor came through in the finished product. Kerrygold is aways a favorite choice of mine and this recipe is no exception. I hope you’ll give it a try and pick some up for this recipe next time you visit the store!

If you give these cranberry kolaches a try let me know what you think! Many thanks to Kerrygold for sponsoring this post and many thanks to you all for supporting brands that make Wood and Spoon possible. Happy baking!

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

If you like this cranberry kolaches you should try:

Pumpkin Danishes

Breakfast Danish

Brown Sugar Danishes

Cranberry Pear Mini Pop-Tarts

Poached Pear Trifles

 

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Cranberry Kolaches

Cranberry Kolaches by Wood and Spoonn blog. These are little puffy sweat yeast parties filled with a homemade cinnamon and cranberry jam or sugared cream cheese filling. Each bite has a little simple crumble on top and is a great breakfast brunch or dessert option. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

These cranberry and cream cheese kolaches are a sweet yeast dough pastry filled with cranberry jam or cream cheese and sprinkled with a crumb topping.

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 45
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 240
  • Yield: 24 1x
  • Category: Pastry
Scale

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 3/4 cup warm milk (not hot or cold)
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 3 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 3 1/4 cups (about 1 lb) all-purpose flour, with more for flouring surfaces
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk, white reserved
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

For the cranberry filling (will fill approximately 12 kolaches):

  • 11/2 cups cranberries
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons water

For the cream cheese filling (Will fill approximately 16 kolaches):

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • 3/4 cup powdered sugar
  • ½ of a lightly beaten egg, the other half reserved.
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt

For the streusel:

  • ½ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter

Instructions

To prepare the dough:

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, stir together the warm milk and 2 teaspoons of sugar. Evenly sprinkle the yeast over top of the milk and allow the yeast to activate, about 5 minutes. The mixture should froth and foam slightly. You can stir it gently to make sure all the yeast has been moistened, but if the yeast does not foam, dump it out and start over. Once yeast has been activated, beat 1/2 cup of the flour in to the milk mixture using the paddle attachment. Once combined, add the remaining sugar, eggs, egg yolk, vanilla, and salt, and beat the mixture on medium speed until combined. On low speed, add the remainder of the flour, 1/2 cup at a time, scraping the sides of the bowl as needed. Once evenly combined, increase the speed to medium (I use speed number 4 on my Kitchen Aid stand mixer) and add the softened butter 1 tablespoon at a time. Scrape the sides of the bowl and then continue to beat on medium speed for an additional 4 minutes. The dough will be quite moist and sticky, and will hold together in long strands when you attempt to scoop it from the bowl.
  2. Lightly grease a large bowl and place the dough inside, covering it tightly with a piece of plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rest until it has approximately doubled in size, about 1-1/2-2 hours. In the meantime, prepare the fillings.

To prepare the cranberry filling:

  1. All of the ingredients in a small saucepan and place over medium low heat. Cook, stirring and squishing the cranberries regularly, until the mixture is thickened and bubbling, about 8-10 minutes. Set aside to cool completely.

To prepare the cream cheese filling:

  1. Use an electric mixer to combine all of the ingredients. Set aside until ready to use.

To prepare the streusel:

  1. Combine the sugar, flour, and salt. Stir in the melted butter until combined and sandy in texture. Set aside until ready to use.

To prepare the kolaches:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Roll out the risen dough to 1/2 “ thick. Use a 2” cutter to trim out rounds of dough. Lay them out on parchment-lined baking sheets and cover with a piece of plastic wrap or a tea towel. Set aside to allow the dough rounds to rise for approximately 60 minutes or until fluffy. When risen, use your thumb or a floured bottom of a tablespoon-sized measuring spoon to lightly until rounds into the center of the dough. You should leave about ¼-1/2” border around the edge of each round. Whisk the remaining half of the beaten egg with 1 teaspoon of water and use a pastry brush to lightly brush a thin layer of the mixture on top of each pastry. Fill the hole of each kolache with your filling of choice. Approximately half of them will be cream cheese and half will be cranberry. Sprinkle the undented edges of the pastries with the streusel generously. Bake in the preheated oven for about 18-20 minutes or until the pastries are golden and puffed. Remove from oven to cool slightly prior to consuming.

Notes

  • The cranberry filling is rather tart. You can add 1-2 tablespoons of extra sugar to sweeten it after cooking, if desired.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

IT’S MOVING WEEK! I can’t believe it’s finally here. After 15 months of construction, 2 years of architectural planning, and 5-1/2 years of limbo living in our rental house, we will finally get to move into our dream house this Friday. I’m beyond excited. I’ve got those night before Christmas/ tomorrow’s my birthday/ going to a surprise party kind of jitters. Basically we’re freaking out with joy over here, okay?

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Our dishes and bakeware and utensils are all packed, so we’ve been living off of carry-out and protein bars this past week. I just want to simplify everything else in life so that this move, the holidays, EVERYTHING won’t feel too big of overwhelming. Maybe a week spent eating out of greasy paper bags isn’t the best way to do it, but we’re all doing our best over here. In the meantime, I’ve started dreaming about those first few bakes in my brand spankin’ new kitchen, starting with today’s recipe for overnight cinnamon rolls. I’ve held back on this recipe for a while, because it required lots of testing to determine when and how this recipe was best prepared. Finally, with a little patience and some shopping made simple with my friends at Brandless, I landed a recipe I’m really pleased with.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Brandless is an online retailer that offer quality products at fair prices. Offering everything from gift wrap to coconut oil to dinnerware, Brandless offers hundreds of everyday essentials and better-for-you products at incredibly affordable prices. Living in a rural area often limits my access to the items I need in my home and kitchen, and with Brandless I can receive those products straight to my front door in no time. Sign me up for anything that prevents me from making one more trek to the grocery store.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

To prep for the overnight cinnamon rolls, I ordered Brandless’ All-Purpose Organic Unbleached Wheat Flour, Organic Light Brown Sugar, Organic Ground Cinnamon, and Organic Cane Sugar, as well as the cute spice jars and bowl scrapers you see in the photos. With the addition of a few everyday refrigerated items, the rolls were ready for making. This is a sweet yeasted dough that is rolled out and slathered with butter, brown sugar, and heaps of cinnamon. Tight little spirals of dough are allowed to rest in a baking dish over night and are then baked in a hot oven the next morning. The result is an incredibly tender, fluffy roll loaded with flavor and a generous slathering of cream cheese icing. Yes, it’s as beyond as it sounds.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

To make the overnight cinnamon rolls we start with the dough. Yeast is sprinkled to dissolve over a mixture of warm milk and water. Eggs, melted butter, and brown sugar come next before the bread flour and all-purpose flour are stirred in with some salt. The dough is kneaded for several minutes until it becomes smooth and slightly tacky. Allow the ball of dough for your overnight cinnamon rolls to rest in a covered bowl on the counter.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Once doubled in size, roll the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cover the dough with melted butter and sprinkle on a generous amount of brown sugar and cinnamon. Roll the dough tightly from end to end and then slice it into 1-1/2″ sections to spread out on a lightly greased pan. Cover the pan and place it in the fridge overnight.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

The following morning when you’re ready to enjoy your overnight cinnamon rolls, remove the pan from the fridge and preheat the oven. I like to stick my pan right next to the hot oven while it preheats so that it can shed some of its overnight chill. If you’d like your rolls to brown a little extra in the oven you can brush them with a water or milk. Bake in the oven until the edges have just started to bronze and the internal temperature reads 190 degrees F. A thermometer really helps here because overdone rolls are usually drier and more dense rolls too. Ew.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Whip up the icing with a little cream cheese, butter, and powdered sugar. You can barely warm the icing for a thin, pourable glaze, or you can leave it thick to spread directly on top of the overnight cinnamon rolls. Your choice. Either way, you’re going to love them.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Give these overnight cinnamon rolls a try and be sure to check out all of the goodies on Brandless.com. I’m so pleased to have found a way to simplify shopping, especially this time of year, and I think you’ll agree if you give it a shot. Whip up a batch of these for Christmas morning and let me know what you think. Happy Wednesday and Happy Baking!

This post is sponsored by Brandless. All opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting brands that my Wood & Spoon possible!

If you like these overnight cinnamon rolls you should try:

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Rolls

Hazelnut Cinnamon Rolls

Chocolate Sweet Rolls

Orange Cardamom Rolls

Cinnamon Swirl Bread

 

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Overnight Cinnamon Rolls

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy brown sugar and spice morning buns topped with a cream cheese frosting. The yeast dough can be prepped ahead of time, rolled, and left to rest in the fridge until baking time the following morning. This recipe makes delicious breakfast treats a cinch and is perfect for holiday entertaining. Find the recipe and how to for these pastries on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood
  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 480
  • Yield: 14 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 1 cup (240 gm) milk, lukewarm
  • ¼ cup (60 gm) water, lukewarm
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 6 tablespoons (85 gm)unsalted butter, melted but not too hot
  • 1 large egg plus 2 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup (50 gm) brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup (50 gm) sugar
  • 23/4 cups (385 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 11/2 cups (210 gm) bread flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt

For the filling:

  • 5 tablespoons (70 gm) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice, if desired
  • ¾ cup (150 gm) brown sugar

For the frosting:

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup (115 gm) powdered sugar
  • 2+ tablespoons of milk

Instructions

To prepare the dough:

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl, combine the milk and water and sprinkle the yeast over top of it. Allow the yeast to dissolve, about 5 minutes. Stir in the butter, egg, egg yolks, and brown sugar, and sugar until smooth. In a small bowl, combine the flour, bread flour, and salt. Dump about half of the dry ingredients into the yeast mixture and stir until combined. Pour in the remaining dry ingredients and knead in the bowl using the dough hook attachment until smooth and slightly tacky, about 7 minutes. If you notice your dough isn’t pulling away from the sides of the bowl or it’s too wet, add flour 2 tablespoons at a time until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and forms a little dough “tornado” around the dough hook. Once done kneading, place the dough into a large lightly greased bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap to double in size, about 1-1/2 – 2 hours.
  2. Once the dough has risen, dump it out onto a lightly floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a large rectangle about 11”x21” in size. Pour the melted butter and spread it out over top. Combine the cinnamon, pumpkin pie spice, and brown sugar and sprinkle evenly over the buttered dough. Starting with one of the long ends, tightly roll the dough from end to end and pinch the edges together to seal. Cut the dough into 1-1/2” sections and lay them out 2” apart in a lightly greased baking dish. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge overnight.
  3. In the morning, remove the rolls from the fridge and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Keep the baking dish close to the oven while it preheats to help the rolls come to room temp. Once preheated, bake in the oven for about 22-25 minutes or until the edges are barely golden and the internal temp is 190 degrees. Remove from the oven and prepare your frosting.

To prepare the frosting:

  1. Cream the cream cheese and butter in large bowl at medium speed until smooth, about 1 minute. Add the powdered sugar and milk and beat to combine. Add additional milk to thin out the frosting or more powdered sugar to thicken it. You can also gently warm the frosting to pour over the rolls as a glaze. Cinnamon rolls are best enjoyed warm.

Poached Pear Trifles

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m slowly learning that parenting is approximately 20% trickery. Whether it be with potty training, getting dressed for school, or even coercing them into (or out of) the bath, I often find myself leaning on trickery to get my kids to do what I want them to do. Awesome parenting, right? 

Take for instance eating new foods. The current battle royale in our home is convincing my kids that they will like a food they’ve never tried before. Now don’t be fooled into thinking this issue lies specifically with fruits, vegetable, or other decidedly “healthy” foods. No, it seems that when my children come under the notion that they will not like a food they will simply refuse to eat it, often with little reason at all. This morning, Aimee decided she didn’t want bagels with cream cheese and jam. Yes, you read right- bagels.  She took one look at it and had a near meltdown. Did I know she would like the bagel? Yes. Was I sure it would take only one bite for her to fall in love with those chewy rounds of bread? For sure. But you try convincing a strong-willed 4-year-old of that. Impossible.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

In some respect, I understand. I have tricked them into eating out of the ordinary dishes before. There was the sushi incident of 2015 and that one time I tried to pass off spaghetti squash as actual noodles. No amount of butter can turn cauliflower into real mashed potatoes, and I know my kids don’t believe me when I tell them their plain Greek yogurt is the same thing their friends eat out of plastic tubes at school. So in a way, experience has taught them they can’t take me at my word. Again, awesome parenting, right?

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

If we’re being completely transparent, there’s a lot of foods I simply won’t spring for either. The best example I can come up with right now is when people try to pass off non-dessert items as dessert. Like, a cheese plate? Not dessert. Diet wafers? I’d rather not. When I indulge in dessert I really want it to satisfy my sweet tooth in a special and indulgent way, so even things like fruit, for me, don’t work as a dessert. That is, until these poached pear trifles. 

A pear, on it’s own, wouldn’t really send me over the edge into dessert bliss. But what if that pear had been poached in cinnamon and red wine? What if they were layered with perfect, buttery French madeleines and a creamy whipped filling? What if the whole thing was topped with sugary-spiced nuts? TOTALLY DESSERT.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m sharing today’s recipe for these poached pear trifled with Donsuemor, the makers of the most delicious French madeleines. Made with the very best ingredients and no preservatives or artificial coloring, Donsuemor’s madeleines are dessert all on their own but extra-special when layered in a festive holiday dish like this. Although I ordered online, you can pick these little guys up at Costco and the rest of your desserts are history! You can use them in place of lady fingers in tiramisu, serve them alongside bowls of homemade ice cream, or even dip them in melted chocolate and crushed candies for a semi-homemade treat. I love from-scratch desserts as much as the next person, but in a treat like these poached pear trifles, it’s worth relying on a trustworthy brand to do some legwork for you.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

To make these poached pear trifles we start with the pears. Peeled and quartered pears are cooked in a red wine, sugar, and cinnamon mixture until the pears are soft to a fork. Throw in a handful of fresh cranberries to cook until soft and then remove the fruit to cool. Let the wine mixture continue to cook until slightly reduced and thickened. In the meantime you can prep the filling! I’ve made this filling both with mascarpone and cream cheese, so you can use whichever you prefer. Mascarpone cheese definitely changes the texture of the filling in a way that I didn’t prefer as much as the cream cheese, but you can make that choice for yourself. Simply whip with heavy cream until the mixture is lightly fluffed. Orange zest is added for just a smidge of flavor too.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Both the pears and the cream can be made slightly in advance and layered in with the madeleines just before serving. Add some wine syrup to the bottom of a glass with some of the fruit, top with a madeleine and cream, and then repeat the process again. I finished the dish off with fresh pomegranate and candied nuts, but this is entirely optional. These poached pear trifles just scream FANCY and are perfect for this holiday time of year. I hope you’ll give them a try in the coming weeks and check out Donsuemor’s site for more info on these yummy little bites.

Wish me luck in the “tricking your toddler” department. So far I’m losing that battle, but I think there’s still plenty of hope. Happy Friday to you all and happy baking!

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

This post is sponsored by Donsuemor. Thank you for supporting brands that make Wood and Spoon possible.

If you like these poached pear trifles you should check out:

Cookie Butter Pretzel Mousse

Peppermint Bark Icebox Cake

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Shortcakes

 

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Poached Pear Trifles

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

These poached pear trifles feature red-wine soaked fruit, a fluffy and tangy whipped filling, and buttery homemade madeleines. Adapt the recipe to make anywhere from 4 to 8 servings!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Total Time: 90
  • Yield: 8 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the pears:

  • 1 bottle mild red wine (I used a red table blend)
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 21/2 pounds of pears (I used Barletts), peeled, cored, and quartered
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ¾ cup fresh cranberries (optional)

For the cream:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Additional items:

  • 6 French Madeleines (I use Donsuemor)
  • ½ cup pomegranate seeds
  • Candied walnuts, pecans, or almonds, if desired

Instructions

To prepare the pears:

  1. Combine the wine and sugar in a large saucepan over medium heat, and, while stirring, allow the sugar to dissolve into the wine. Once dissolved, add the pears and cinnamon stick and simmer over medium-low heat for 25-30 minutes until soft to a fork. Time will differ depending on the ripeness of your fruit. Once done, carefully remove the fruit and continue cooking the wine to reduce it another 30 minutes. If you wish to use cranberries, add them in the last 5-10 minutes of cooking. The berries will burst and lose their shape the longer they cook, so I recommend only cooking up to 10 minutes. Allow the mixture to cool if you’re making in advance, otherwise allow it to cool to taste.

To prepare the cream:

  1. Cream the cream cheese and sugar on medium speed in a large bowl until combined. Add the heavy whipping cream and beat on medium speed until thick enough to hold its shape. Add in the orange zest and vanilla and mix just to combine. Set aside in fridge until you’re ready to assemble your trifles.

To assemble the trifles:

  1. Determine if you’d like to make 8 smaller (Weck Jar Sized) or 4 larger (as in the glasses shown here) trifles. If your pear mixture has been chilled, feel free to rewarm to a comfortable temperature briefly. Cut the pears into large chunks if you wish the trifles to be eaten easily with a spoon and stir them in with the cranberries and wine. Spoon a small layer of this mixture into the bottom of each dish and dollop a layer of cream on top of that. Pinch off a few pieces of madeleine to place on top of the cream and repeat the layering of the wine and pears with the cream once more. Finish each trifle with a half of a madeleine coming out of the trifle and garnish with pomegranate seeds, nuts, and additional cranberries and pears, if desired. Serve immediately. If you wish to make these ahead you can serve them cold.

Notes

  • You can use mascarpone cheese in place of the cream cheese although the texture will change.

Pumpkin Danishes

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So you might recall that last weekend was my birthday. We spent Friday and Saturday in Birmingham with friends and family, but the actual day-of was rather standard procedure. Leading up to the day of, Aimee became fixated on preparing me breakfast in bed, and much to her delight, Brett was more than willing to help facilitate.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I wish I had a picture of her face as she tiptoed into my room that morning. Aimee had filled her tiny plastic tea party tray with miniature cups of orange juice and unicorn cereal, Mickey Mouse waffles and French toast sticks. There were cinnamon rolls and fresh coffee, even a couple of cards and those neon colored daisies that they sell at the grocery store. The whole operation just screamed “ AIMEE DID THIS,” and honestly it was one of the sweetest moments of my motherhood thus far.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

In that moment it was clear that even from a young age humans experience innate joy from celebrating the people they love. Aimee, my four year old who can’t even reach the toaster, took such delight in having a hand  in preparing something that she thought would be so special to me. She celebrated me how she would have wanted to be celebrated, and there’s so much feeling and hormonal heart swelling attached to that memory that I could cry just thinking about it. The breakfast itself was special, yes, but it was really nothing more than frozen waffles. The fun in it all for her was being able to share in something that felt out of the ordinary and celebratory. Even my four year old has figured out that it’s good to celebrate the people you love.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I adore these pumpkin danishes. They’re delicious, equal parts buttery and sweet, but they’re definitely not a run-of-the-mill breakfast food. Danishes take time and tons of intentionality. They’re not something you just whip up on a whim, and honestly, that’s kinda what I like about them. I appreciate how special they feel. I love that they’ve got more gusto than a breakfast bar or bowl of cereal. These pumpkin danishes are a dish that says, “Hey! I love you! Let’s celebrate.”

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you’ve hung out around this block long enough, you know about the danishes we’ve done in the past. The dough take time and patience, but once you understand the concept of folding and layering the dough, you’re almost all of the way there. For these pumpkin danishes, we utilize those same dough-making methods and then cut, fold, and fill them to create a cute little 3 bite treat. The pastry is 90% of the work and the filling is really simple, but I also threw in a brown butter glaze that’s really unnecessary. We’re just going all-out over here, okay?

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

The trickiest part of these pumpkin danishes is the shaping of the pastry. In the oven, the pastry will want to unfold and leave an angled corner hanging out on the edge of the danish. Instead, be sure to keep your dough cold and to press the pastry in tight when you shape them. Because the pumpkin filling has egg in it, it does tend to “grow” in the oven. To combat this, I took a cue from Yossy Arefi and doubled filled each one. I filled a little, baked the pastry, filled a little more, and did a final bake. Kinda tedious and really only necessary from an aesthetic standpoint, so if you don’t mind messy pastries you can skip this step. 

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I hope you find a reason to celebrate with these pumpkin danishes ASAP. There’s lots of happy to tap into around us if we just take the time to recognize and love on it. Happy Thursday and happy baking!

If you like these pumpkin danishes you should check out:

Brown Sugar Danishes

Braided Breakfast Danish

Swirled Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Pumpkin Pecan Tart

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby

 

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Pumpkin Danishes

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

These pumpkin danishes include a buttery pastry dough and a pumpkin spice filling. There’s an optional brown butter glaze if you’re feeling super fancy.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 240
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 4 hours 45 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the dough (Adapted from Samantha Seneviratne:

  • 1 ½ cups bread flour, plus more for rolling dough
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 14 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup cold whole milk

For the filling:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened but still cold
  • ½ cup canned pumpkin puree
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 egg, divided
  • ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • Pinch of salt

For the brown butter glaze (optional):

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon milk

Instructions

To prepare the dough:

  1. Combine the flour, granulated sugar, yeast and salt in a food processor. Add butter and pulse to combine until butter is distributed in pea-sized pieces throughout the flour. Put the flour mixture in a medium bowl.
  2. In a separate, small bowl, whisk the egg and milk with 2 tablespoons of water. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Fold the mixture until the liquid is evenly distributed, being careful to not overwork the dough. Dump the contents of the bowl out on to a lightly floured surface and pat into a rectangle. Chill for at least 3 hours, and up to 2 days.
  3. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to an 8-by-15-inch rectangle. Fold the dough in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat the rolling and folding process. Dusting with flour as needed to prevent sticking, rotate, roll, and fold a final time, ending with a small, rectangular piece of dough. Wrap the dough in Saran wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  4. Repeat the entire rolling and folding process one more time. You will have rolled and folded the dough six times. If the dough becomes loose or tacky, place in the fridge to rest for a bit. Wrap the dough and place in the fridge for 2 hours or up to overnight.
  5. To prepare the danishes:
  6. In a large bowl, cream the cream cheese, pumpkin, brown sugar, and sugar on medium speed just until smooth. Break the egg yolk and spoon most of it into the mixture, leaving some behind in a small bowl. Add the pumpkin pie spice and salt to the mixture and stir to combine. Pour the filling into a piping bag or a plastic bag with the corner snipped off. If your filling is loose, place it in the fridge while you prep your pastry.
  7.  
  8. Roll out the dough on a floured surface into a roughly 10”x13” rectangle. Trim ¼” off of each side to straighten edges and cut the dough into 12 equal sized squares (I usually make 3 rows of 4 squares.) Beat the remainder of the egg and brush a dab of it on the four corners of each square of dough. Fold each corner in to the center and press down firmly (but without pushing your finger through the dough!) Transfer each one to a parchment lined sheet pan and cover with a sheet of plastic wrap to rise and puff for about an hour or so. The dough should barely start to spring back when you touch it when it’s ready.
  9. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. If the centers of your pastries have risen a ton you can push down on the centers again. Brush the pastries with the thin layer of the reserved egg. Pipe ½ tablespoon of filling in the center of each one, reserving the additional filling.  Bake in the preheated oven for about 10 minutes and then decrease the temp to 375. You’ll notice that the pastries will have risen quite a bit and likely displaced a lot of the filling- don’t worry. We anticipated this. Quickly and carefully remove the pan from the oven and pipe an additional ½ tablespoon of filling on top. You can use the back of a spoon to move it around to cover the old filing a bit if you’d like. Continue baking at 375 for an additional 8-10 minutes or until the pastries are golden brown. Remove from oven to cool.

To prepare the glaze (optional):

  1. Cook the butter over medium heat on the stove until melted. Continue cooking, stirring all the while, until the butter has begun to brown and smells nutty. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in the powdered sugar and milk. Allow it to cool to drizzle consistency before glazing the pastries.

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you’re anything like me, Mondays can hit you like a freight train. I think we need an excuse to sit quietly, zone out, and have a few moments of rest before we dive into a week of hustle and bustle. To keep your eyes and palate pleased, I’ve rounded up a list of things to read, watch, and savor on this Monday morning. Oh, and there’s cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits too. You’re welcome. 🙂

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

What to Read

Food52 released their fall list of must-read books. In a shocking turn of events, there’s not a single cookbook on the round-up! Check out the list of favorites on their site here.

What to Watch

Jimmy Fallon is the late-night show host of my dreams. I love his willingness to be silly and totally off-the-wall. His newest video, a musical photobomb with Justin Bieber, made me laugh out loud and is straight up awesome. Watch your heart out here.

What to Cook

Chrissy Tieghan’s new cookbook came out this week, and Bon Appetit shared a few favorites from the release. There’s a recipe for Thai soy-garlic fried ribs (yes, it’s a thing) looks absolutely beyond. Literally salivating over here. Check out the recipe here.

What to Wear

I’m counting down the days till it’s cool enough to break out jeans and fall clothing. This getup from Madewell is pretty much destined to be my autumnal uniform.

What to Master

I love this article from Food & Wine about how to nail a recipe every time. I frequently have people tell me that they can’t cook, and I’m a firm believer that if you can follow directions on a well-written recipe you can do anything.

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

What to Bake

As promised, here are the cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits. These are fluffy, Southern-style biscuits with loads of tang and chocolatey goodness to make your breakfasts fab. These morning treats were inspired by the beautiful Carrie Morey of Callie’s Charleston Biscuits . I met Carrie at last year’s Saveur Blog Awards, and I so admire how she has championed her town, baking, and Southern culture with her hugely successful brand. The secret to her biscuits is a healthy mixture of cream cheese and butter, a winning combination that offers loads of flavor and fluff.

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

These cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits are a nod to Carrie. Simple to make, even easier to consume, these morning bites are a new favorite in my house. When we have a batch in our house, Aimee asks for them for breakfast AND dessert, clearly a girl after my own heart.

To make these cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits, we start by combining the dry ingredients. Flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt are tossed together before we cut in the cream cheese and ice cold butter. Use the backs of two forks or a pastry cutter and integrate the fat until pea-sized clumps exist throughout. Add the chocolate chips and then stir in the buttermilk until a shaggy dough comes together.

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

For sky-high biscuits, make sure your ingredients are really cold and that the butter is incorporated throughout. I also recommend using a well-floured biscuit cutter (I use these!) to keep the cuts on the perimeter of your biscuit clean. Push straight down with the cutter and then put your tray of goodies into a piping hot oven. The heat mixed with the cold ingredients will cause everything to melt and expand all at once!

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

To finish off these cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits, I like to top them with a simple cream cheese glaze. You can skip this step if you’d prefer, but I like to be a little over-the-top here. Drizzle the glaze on hot biscuits and then serve immediately. Just be sure you have your coffee ready.

I hope this recipe will get your week off to a delicious start. Have a great week and happy baking, y’all!

If you like these cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits you should try:

Peaches and Cream Biscuits

Honey Nut Biscuits 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches

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Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits

Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are soft and fluffy southern style biscuits filled with butter and cream cheese. The glaze is a creamy frosting and the icing add sweetness to the pastry. These are great treats for weekday breakfast or weekend brunch. inspired by Callie's hot little biscuits, this food feels special and makes the mornings more fun. Find the recipe and how-to at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

These cream cheese chocolate chip biscuits are fluffy, tangy morning treats full of chocolate morsels and topped with a cream cheese glaze. Read more about making layered biscuits here!

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the biscuits:

  • 2 cups (280 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter, cold, plus 2 tablespoons melted
  • ½ cup (85 gm) mini chocolate chips
  • ¾ cup (180 gm) cold buttermilk

For the topping:

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 1 cup (115 gm) powdered sugar
  • 12 tablespoons milk

Instructions

To make the biscuits:

  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Use the back of a fork or a pastry cutter to cut in the cream cheese and butter until large, pea-sized clumps exist throughout. Stir in the chocolate chips and then add the buttermilk, stirring to combine. Dump the shaggy dough out onto a floured surface and used floured hands to gently pat the dough out into a 1” rectangle. Fold the dough in thirds like a letter and then pat it out again into 1” thickness. Use a 2” biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Gently combine the scraps and then pat out that mixture to 1” thick again. Cut out additional rounds. Place the dough rounds 2″ apart onto a baking sheet and brush the tops with the melted butter. Place the pan in the oven, reduce the heat to 400, and bake for about 18-20 minutes or until the tops are puffed and golden. You may need to rotate the pan towards the end of baking if one size is darkening faster than the other. Allow the biscuits to cool briefly while you prepare the topping.
  2. To prepare the topping:
  3. Beat the cream cheese and powdered sugar in large bowl just until smooth. Add a tablespoon or more or milk to get the icing a smooth, spreadable consistency. Smooth a dollop on each biscuit and serve immediately!

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

The other day, my mom and I were talking about this blog and how things had been going. She mentioned that she had noticed there hadn’t been as much narrative  attached to the recipes, and after some consideration, I realized she was right. You see, from day one this site has not existed merely to fill bowls and spoons with calorie-packed cakes and frosting-swirled treats. I wanted Wood and Spoon to be a place where people could come to nourish their bellies but also their hearts too. It’s safe to say that this blog will never have the easiest recipes, the best shortcuts, or be regarded as the premier resource for baking how-to’s, but I’ll be damned if you leave these pages feeling anything less than encouraged and inspired to create in your own homes. In our weird sort of internet kind of way, I want us to be friends and to engage with stories and food in a way that will impact you in your own world. Does that make sense?

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

I guess what I’m trying to say is that we can be transparent here. We can share cookies and recipes, but moreso than that, I want us t0 share words and memories like two friends would over cups of coffee at the kitchen counter. I want to invite you into my world, my kitchen, in hopes that you feel the freedom to do the same in your own circles. If you leave this site with an idea to create and the gumption to love the ones around you via food, well, my job is done.

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

So for the sake of transparency, I want to talk about joy. I heard someone recently say that joy is the unicorn of emotions. It’s hard to capture it, to feel it all the time, or to understand what it’s all about, but when you see it, you know what you’ve witnessed. Joy has been the elusive theme of my life for a few months now, and I constantly find myself on the hunt- looking for it around each corner, trying to figure out how to bottle up that magic for myself. 

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

I see joy on the faces of my toddlers as they race around our yard and dance about our living room. I witness it in airports as families welcome home long-awaited brothers and sisters. I feel it in church, in the the crescendo of a good song, and even sometimes in the confines of my kitchen, that little sanctuary where, every once in a while, I capture a memory of someone I love through a single bite of food.

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

Joy eludes me when I lose touch with my willingness to receive it. I tend to put my head down and rush from task to task, deadline to deadline, constantly existing in the process but never really looking up long enough to enjoy it. This way of life buries me, and it’s not until I look up to catch a breath that I realize what I’ve been missing.

So that has been me these past few months. This site and the stories we share are hugely important to me, but I needed to slow down into some weeks of saying “YES!” to other things. For all the times I said “No” to testing recipes, editing photos, or checking my email for the millionth time, I said “Yes” to something I needed more. I said “Yes” to my children and to later dinnertimes, to popsicles in the backyard and dreaming about the future with my husband. I said “Yes” to some things that make me really joyful.

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

One of the recipes I did take time to love on is this honey cake with figs and whipped cream cheese. Every year, like clockwork, my father-in-law’s fig tree produces a bounty of fruit that is so beautiful, it’s almost a travesty that the harvest is so short. After last year’s honey mascarpone tart, I knew I wanted to capture that summer essence in a beautiful and simple cake. This honey cake with figs and whipped cream cheese is what I came up with, and I think you’re going to like it.

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

For starters, we’ve got a single layer cake, rich and heavy from the addition of honey. To lighten it up, a cream cheese whipped cream, barely tangy and totally cloud-like, goes on top and is adorned with some over-the-top toppings. Juicy figs are sliced and sprinkled on with candied walnuts and a drizzle of honey to finish off this summertime stunner. Truly, this honey cake with figs and whipped cream cheese is as yummy as it is beautiful.

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

I’ll spare you the details on how to make this cake and will instead give you some tips for success here. First, be sure to assemble the cake with its toppings just before serving. While the cream cheese does help make the whipped cream more stable, it still will eventually fall and become watery. In addition, the figs will release juices once cut and coated with sugar, so if you want to avoid a sticky mess, be sure to assemble close to consumption time. For a more honey-forward cake, you can sub some of the sugar out for additional honey, but keep in mind that this substitution will change the texture of the cake. See the notes section of the recipe for more on that. Finally, do not skip the nuts here. This barely-sweet cake benefits from the texture and flavor that the sweet morsels of walnuts provide, so much so that one could argue they are the real hero here.

With that being said, I want to introduce you to a new friend that you’ll be seeing on the pages of this blog over the next year: Diamond of California Nuts! I am thrilled to have partnered with my long-time go-to, and over the coming year we are going to create some seriously delicious things with these nutty beauties. Please welcome them into your own kitchens, and thank you in advance for supporting the brands that makes the magic on this site possible. Happy baking to you all!

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this honey cake with figs and whipped cream cheese you should check out:

Pistachio Honey Bars

Honey Mascarpone Tart with Figs and Salty Graham Cracker Crust

Honey Nut Biscuits

Honey Salted Almond Ice Cream

Strawberry Fig Pop-Tarts

 

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Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese by Wood and Spoon. This is a single layer round honey cake topped with a cream cheese flavored stable whipped cream, fresh figs and candied Diamond walnuts. An extra drizzle of honey rounds out this simple yet elegant summer and fall recipe. Enjoy this seasonal treat recipe by Kate Wood on thewoodandspoon.com

This honey cake with figs and whipped cream cheese is a simple summer cake topped with candied walnuts, tangy whipped cream, and sweet fruit. 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 40
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake (Adapted from Vintage Cakes by Julie Richardson):

  • ¾ cup (170 gm) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (170 gm) honey
  • 1 cup (200 gm) sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 cups (280 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup (120 gm) buttermilk, at room temperature

For the whipped cream:

  • 6 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (60 gm) confectioner’s sugar
  • 11/2 cups (360 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons buttermilk (optional)

For the candied walnuts:

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts

For the topping:

  • Figs, or another chopped fruit of your choice
  • Extra honey for drizzling
  • Candied Walnuts

Instructions

To prepare the cake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and grease the bottom of a light-colored 9” (springform would work here as well) pan, lining the bottom with a round of parchment paper. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter, honey, sugar, and vanilla extract. Start on low speed to combine and then increase to medium-high (I use 6 on my mixer) for 6 minutes, or until light and fluffy. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the eggs one at a time, stirring on low after each addition to combine. Scrape the sides of the bowl. In a small bowl, stir to combine the flour, baking powder, and salt. Add half of the dry ingredients to the butter and honey mixture, stirring on low to almost combine. Scrape the sides of the bowl, stir in the buttermilk, and then add the remaining dry ingredients, stirring only until incorporated. Spread the batter into the prepared pan and baking in the preheated oven for about 40 minutes or until a toothpick inserted just barely comes out clean. Allow to cool completely before topping with the whipped cream, figs, and walnuts. You can also drizzle additional honey as desired. Serve immediately.

To prepare the whipped cream:

  1. In a large bowl, beat the cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Slowly drizzle in the whipping cream a tablespoon at a time until it is all incorporated. Scrape the sides of the bowl as needed. Increase the speed on your mixer and whip on medium-high speed until stiff peaks form. Give the mixture a taste- if you would prefer it to be a little bit tangier, add in about 2 tablespoons of buttermilk. This will thin the mixture out a bit but will add yummy flavor. Spread on top of the cake and serve immediately!

To prepare the walnuts:

  1. Combine the butter, vanilla, sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a medium, non-stick over medium heat until the butter has melted. Add the nuts and stir regularly using a rubber spatula until the nuts have toasted and the sugar has begun to melt, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and spread out the nuts to cool on a sheet of parchment paper.

Notes

  1. For a more honey-forward tasting cake you can use 2/3 cup of honey and only ¾ cup of sugar in the cake. This will yield a more heavy, dense feeling cake, but the honey flavor is more prominent. I like to use the original recipe and then drizzle extra honey on additional pieces as desired.
  2. Dark colored pans will brown this cake a ton! I prefer to use a light-colored pan, but both will work.

This post is sponsored by Diamond of California Nuts. Thank you for supporting brands that make Wood & Spoon possible!

Peaches and Cream Biscuits

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I guess I drank the Kool-Aid.

For years after moving to Alabama, I enjoyed the South but never really identified myself as a Southerner. I bought cowboy boots, listened to Keith Urban, and picked up a preference for bourbon, all along thinking that I was merely a spectator enjoying the best of what Southern culture had to offer. Even after marrying and moving with my husband to the seriously deep-South town of Selma, AL, I still felt a little like a Yankee on an extended vacation. 

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Somewhere over the course of the past 10 years, I drank the Kool-Aid. I fell in love with sweet tea and grits and banana pudding. I grew accustomed to barefoot toddlers that called me “Ma’am” and spoke with a drawl. And I especially loved the warmth of the people, the significance of a supper table here, and the fact that this is a place where manners and kindness still matter.

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

With that being said, I have big news to share with you: we’re building a house! For a while now, my husband and I have been planning and building our forever home. It has been a hugely intense project, but as we closer to moving in, I’m so proud and grateful to have found such a special corner of the world to settle down in. Over the coming months, I look forward to sharing more with you about our place and the exciting things to come, but for now, know that you’ll forever get a Southern flair in the recipes you find here because we are making a permanent stay out of our sweet home Alabama. Hooray!

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate WoodPeaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

On that same note, I have a seriously Southern treat to share with you today: peaches and cream biscuits. If the most Southern fruit (peaches) had a baby with the most Southern baked good (biscuits), and we drizzled said baby with an over-the-top frosting (as one does in the South), it would be these peaches and cream biscuits. Two layers of buttery biscuit dough filled with a cinnamon and brown sugar-spiced peach filling make up these breakfast treats, and I think you’ll agree that they make a fun and yummy twist on your run-of-the-mill breakfast. Let’s chat about how to make them!

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

To prepare peaches and cream biscuits, we start with the filling. Sliced peaches are cooked in a frying pan with brown sugar, butter, cinnamon, and salt. Once the butter has melted and the peaches are coated, remove the pan from the heat and allow the mixture to cool while you prep the biscuit dough.

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

In a large bowl, stir together your dry ingredients. Use a pastry cutter to cut in chunks of ice cold butter until the mixture has pea-sized clumps throughout. Pour in the milk and stir until a shaggy dough comes together. Dump the mixture out onto a lightly floured counter and quickly work the dough together with your hands. Use a rolling pin to roll the dough out into a large rectangle and arrange the peach filling onto half of the dough. Fold the second half of dough over the fruit and pinch the edges of dough together to seal in the filling. Transfer the stuffed biscuit to a pan and use a sharp knife to slice into squares. Bake in the preheated oven until the peaches and cream biscuits are golden brown.

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Once baked, you have the option to drizzle the biscuits with a cream cheese glaze. This is kinda messy and totally optional, but I think the tangy sweetness works well here. These biscuits are best served warm, so if you don’t plan to eat them immediately, hold off on the glaze. They’ll reheat nicely the next day in a toaster oven.

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Make these peaches and cream biscuits for an upcoming breakfast or brunch! This recipe will serve a crowd, so feel free to halve it if you’re just preparing for your small family of three or four. Either way, whip up these biscuits for the people you love and enjoy. Happy baking!

If you like these peaches and cream biscuits you should try:

Honey Nut Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

Lemon Berry Crumb Cake

Peach Crumb Muffins

 

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Peaches and Cream Biscuits

Peaches and Cream Biscuits by Wood and Spoon blog. These are buttermilk biscuits with a juicy layer of fresh peaches baked right in the center! Fresh peaches are cooked quickly with brown sugar and cinnamon and layered in between two pieces of biscuit dough. They're baked until golden and then drizzled with a gooey cream cheese glaze, perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

These peaches and cream biscuits are southern-style biscuits stuffed with a cinnamon and brown sugar peach filled. Finish them off with a cream cheese glaze for a delicious breakfast or brunch option!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the peaches:

  • 2 small peaches sliced in 1/8” slices (about about 215 gm or 1-1/4 cup of slices)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ¾ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • pinch of salt

For the biscuits:

  • 3 cups (420 gm) all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) brown sugar
  • 21/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup (170 gm) unsalted butter, cold and diced
  • 11/4 cup (300 gm) milk (I use whole)
  • Extra milk and sugar for sprinkling, if desired

For the cream cheese glaze, if desired:

  • 2 ounces (60 gm) cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (60 gm) powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

To prepare the peaches:

  1. Add all of the ingredients to a medium-sized pan over medium heat. Allow the butter to melt completely, stirring the ingredients to combine. Once the butter has melted pull the pan off the heat and allow to cool while you preheat the oven.

To prepare the biscuits:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Use a pastry cutter or the backs of two forks to cut in the butter until it has bene reduced to pea-sized clumps throughout. Add a cup of the milk and stir to bring the dough together, adding an additional tablespoon of milk as needed until a shaggy dough has formed. Dump the clumps of wet dough out on the counter and use your hands to bring it together. Pat the mixture out into a flat disk and use a rolling pin on your floured surface to roll the dough out into a 9”x12” rectangle. Dump the peaches mixture out on half of the dough and fold the other half over top of it, pinching the edges to seal in the fruit. Transfer the rectangle of folded dough to a sheet pan. Use a sharp knife to cut the dough into 12 biscuits. Brush the top of it with milk or cream and sprinkle with a couple of tablespoons of sugar. Bake in the preheated oven for about 20-22 minutes or until the top is golden brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool for 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving.

To prepare the cream cheese glaze:

  1. Cream the cream cheese and powdered sugar with a hand mixer on medium speed until smooth. Add the milk and vanilla and stir to combine. Drizzle over the biscuits and enjoy!

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

So this is it. This is 30. Yesterday was the turn of a new decade for me, and to commemorate my twenties and the ten birthdays that passed in that time, I am sharing with you some pumpkin pull-apart bread. 

I’m probably supposed to be in mourning right now. You’re likely expecting me to talk about how great my twenties were or to complain about getting older. Maybe you’re anticipating a lengthy list of resolutions for the 10 years that follow today, or perhaps you’re just scrolling through all this nonsense so that you can read about the baked goods (no judgement, BTW.)

To be honest, 30 feels a whole lot like 29. A lot of joy, a hint stress, the occasional internal battle. I’m sure in the coming years, I’ll continue to yell at my kids and count my gray hairs a bit too often. There will be vacations and laughter and long phone calls with friends, moments of fresh revelation and desperation for answers to prayers. 

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

Our lives will forever ebb and flow- seasons of glasses half empty and days of cups running over.  If 30 is different from 20 in any way, it is that I now know to expect the unexpected from life. And I’m okay with that uncertainty. I’ll relish in the highs and steady myself through the lows, knowing that that there are nuggets of gold and truth and hope to uncover in every season if I’m willing to smoke them out.  For me, 30 is the year of resting in the things that I know, a time for dusting off bits of myself that sat hidden on the proverbial shelf during the busyness and insecurity of my twenties. Maybe 30 will be the grand unveiling of a woman who is beautifully average but so content in the aesthetic of her own skin that she sparkles in a way that a 20-year-old simply cannot. 

Maybe 30 is the new 20. 

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

I’m sharing this pumpkin pull-apart bread alongside a number of other bloggers  who are slinging pumpkin-filled recipes for the annual Virtual Pumpkin Party. You might remember last year’s pumpkin cake with burnt sugar frosting? Well, we’re back at it again, bigger and better than ever, because that’s what we do. We grow, we progress, we get infinitely cooler over time.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

This pumpkin pull-apart bread is fab. I adapted the recipe from my sweet potato cinnamon rolls which are a not-so-subtle nod to Ree’s famous buns. This pumpkin pull-apart bread is gooey and fragrant, the perfect comfort dish for the coming chilly seasons. If this bread was a sweater, it would be an oversized cable-knit turtle neck in a rosy shade of millennial pink. It’s fresh yet familiar all at the same time.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

To make this pumpkin pull-apart bread, we start with a dough. Butter, milk, and sugar are warmed and sprinkled with yeast. The pumpkin is added next, along with of flour and spicy fall seasonings. While the original cinnamon rolls have a tender, moist dough, we add extra flour and kneading time to strengthen the pumpkin pull-apart bread dough. Once tacky and slightly stretchy, the dough is set aside to rise.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

Next comes the rolling and stacking of the dough. We cut a ton of equal-sized tiny squares and layer them in a loaf pan with a cinnamon sugar filling so that each piece of bread, coated with gooey sweetened butter filling, pulls apart easily. The bread undergoes a second rise before it is baked and drizzled with more goo, this time a cream cheese glaze, slightly tangy and perfectly sweet.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

This pumpkin pull-apart bread should be the centerpiece of your upcoming brunches and holiday meals. Simple, comfortable flavors in the packaging of a unique and modern treat. Give this pumpkin pull-apart bread a try and I promise that you’ll fall in love. Be sure to check out the other recipes involved in the #virtualpumpkinparty! You’ll be seeing them scattered over various sites today, and they’re sure to knock your socks off. Many thanks to Sara for coordinating this fun little get together. 

If you like this pumpkin pull-apart bread, you should check out:

Pumpkin Pecan Cake with Burnt Sugar Frosting

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Rolls 

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

Orange Cardamom Cinnamon Rolls

 

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Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

This pumpkin pull-apart bread s sweetened with a cream cheese drizzle and is the perfect addition to fall and winter breakfasts and brunches.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 200
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 230
Scale

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • ½ cup (120 mL) whole milk
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • 21/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¾ cup (170 gm) pumpkin puree
  • 23/4 cups (360 gm) all-purpose flour, plus up to ¼ cup more if needed
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice

For the filling:

  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • ½ cup (100 gm) sugar
  • ½ cup (100 gm) brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg

For the icing:

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • ¾ cup powdered sugar
  • 12 teaspoons milk

Instructions

  1. Combine the milk, butter, and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and stir to combine until the butter has melted. Remove from heat to the bowl of a stand mixer (or a large bowl) and allow to cool to lukewarm. Once cooled, sprinkle the yeast over the top and allow it to dissolve, stirring occasionally as needed.
  2. Stir the pumpkin into the milk mixture and then add the remaining ingredients. Using a dough hook attachment (or your hands) knead the dough on medium speed for 5 minutes. The dough should be tacky but pull away from the sides of the bowl easily. Grease a large bowl, place the dough inside, and cover the bowl with a sheet of plastic wrap. Allow it to rise in a warm spot in the kitchen until doubled in size, about 1-1/2 hours.
  3. Grease a standard loaf pan (8.5” x 3.5”) and roll the dough out onto a well-floured surface into a 12”x 20” rectangle. Use the back of a fork to combine the butter, sugars, cinnamon and nutmeg into a creamy paste. Gently spread this over the entire sheet of dough.
  4. Using a pizza cutter or a sharp knife, cut the dough into 6- 12” long strips. Carefully make two stacks of dough (with three strips in each stack) and cut each stack into three equal pieces. You should end up with 18 equal-sized rectangles of dough. Layer all of the dough pieces in the pan, being careful not to squish to dough pieces down too much. Cover with a sheet of plastic wrap and allow to rise a second time and preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  5. Once the dough has risen about ½-1” above the top of the pan (about 30 minutes)s, place in the preheated oven and bake for about 30-35 minutes, or until the top has turned golden and set, even in the middle. You can gently touch some of the pieces of dough in the middle of the pan to ensure that it doesn’t still feel soft and mushy. Be sure that the dough is not under-baked in the center or your loaf will deflate when you remove it from the oven. Once baked, allow the loaf to cool in the pan on a cooling rack.
  6. Once almost all the way cooled, remove the loaf from the pan and prepare the icing. Beat the cream cheese and sugar in a large bowl with a hand mixer until smooth. Add just enough milk to make it loose enough to drizzle. Pour over the top of the loaf and serve! You can rewarm in the oven or microwave as well.

Recipe adapted from Ree Drummond

Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Guys, if you thought you liked eating regular tiramisu, just wait until you see what happens when you stack it like a birthday cake. Straight up MAGICAL. Making this tiramisu cake is one of the better choices I’ve made recently. Unlike some things in life, this cake is a no-brainer. 

Someone recently asked me if Brett and I planned to have any more children. At the time, I think I was bouncing a fussy George on one hip while Aimee cried loudly from time out in the next room over. I diffused that question with a laugh and gestured towards the two crying babies as if to say, “Ha! Not any time soon.”

One of my (many) prerequisites for having more children is that someone has to be potty trained. Someone needs to be able to manage their own bathroom situation without mom having to get involved. I can’t simultaneously change the diaper of one child and wipe the bottom of another while a newborn is latched on to my boob. Moms may have superpowers but I’ve only got two hands, okay?

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Brett and I have spent the last few months casually trying to potty train Aimee, and while there have been some major improvements, we’re just not quite there yet. In fact, I’m convinced Aimee is pretty much using the toilet to scratch her itch for candy. “Mama, if Aimee goes peepee on the potty, I get candy?” “Mama, Aimee sat on the potty at school today- you give me candy?” “Mama, come look in the potty! There’s peepee! Aimee get candy!” You can’t blame the girl. IT’S CANDY. It’s practically a form of currency for toddlers. (Sidenote: Please watch this bit of Jerry Seinfeld standup where he talks about kids and candy. HILARIOUS.)

So I’ve basically resorted to whoring out our candy drawer for any degree of bathroom activity, because I am desperate to get out of this phase of life where I have to change two sets of diapers. Unfortunately, no amount of candy can stand up against the wants of a stubborn child. Aimee, my strong-willed beauty, who even at 2 years old already has unique certainty of who she is and what she wants, has decided she does not want to be entirely potty trained. She is perfectly content to wear a pull-up 24/7, and no amount of begging, bribing, encouragement or discipline will change that until she is ready. So what’s a girl to do? Let the kid eat, breathe, sleep in the bathroom just in case she decides to go? That sounds sanitary. Maybe keep changing the diapers? That sounds tiresome. Maybe I’ll just pour a cocktail and let dad do the work. Wait, that actually sounds brilliant…Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog // thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!I’ve only been doing this for a couple of years, so I don’t have all of the mom stuff figured out yet. What I do know is cake. So let’s talk about that instead. 

This tiramisu cake is decadent. A take on the old Italian classic, this cake is three layers of creamy, coffee, moist cakey goodnesss and is a stunning way to transform an otherwise plain looking dessert. We start by baking the cake layers. I use a simple vanilla cake recipe adapted from the brilliant Rose Levy Beranbaum. She makes most things perfect, so you can trust this recipe. The cake layers are moist yet dense and stable enough to handle the soak and cream filling this cake sports.

Once the layers are baked, cooled, and ready for stacking, we make the mascarpone cream frosting by beating together the cheese, sugar, cream, and Kahlua. Next, we soak the cakes in some coffee and liquor mainly because that’s what you do with tiramisu but also because booze and caffeine are the lifeblood of any decent parent, AMIRITE!?! I chose to assemble this tiramisu cake in the same way that I stack my naked cakes in order to keep the layers tidy and pretty, but if you’re desperate to just face-plant into the cake and don’t care what it looks like you can totally bypass this step. Once assembled, the cake take a long nap in the fridge before it’s ready to be served and enjoyed.

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! The Wood and Spoon Blog.

Even though I’m a sucker for cake in general, somehow this tiramisu cake gets to me. The texture, the flavors, the way it reminds me of the many slices of tiramisu that I’ve had before- everything just screams “YES!” to me. This tiramisu cake gets better over time, so it’s a great dessert to make ahead, store in the fridge, and serve a day or two later. The coffee soak and mascarpone whipped cream filling keep the cake moist, so you can continue to enjoy it 3, 4, maybe even 5 days after preparing it. No guarantees it will go that long uneaten though. If you’re in a rush and don’t want to fuss with a homemade cake, of course you can substitute a box cake mix, but keep in mind that there will be enough mascarpone filling for 3 layers of cake, so you’ll need more than a single box of cake mix. Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! Naked Cake by The Wood and Spoon Blog

You guys know me. I make no qualms about having my ducks in a row or always knowing what to do when it comes to stuff like being a mom, wife, or official potty trainer. But this tiramisu cake? You can bank on it. If you’re a coffee lover, a cake lover, or a booze lover, this tiramisu cake is bound to make all of your dreams come true. Scouts honor.

Give the recipe a try let me know what you think! I think it’d be perfect for your next dinner party, birthday, or casual “It’s Wednesday and I love myself” gathering. If you need me, I’ll be over here in the land of Skittles and mini toddler-sized toilets, s if you have any words of wisdom on managing the bowels of tiny humans, I’ll gladly listen. Happy Tuesday and cheers to you!

 

You may also like:

Espresso Caramel Thumbprint Cookies

Peppermint Bark Ice Cream Cake

Hazelnut Mocha Cream Pie

 

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Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

This tiramisu cake is three layers of vanilla cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and frosted with a creamy mascarpone whipped cream.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: 10 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake layers

  • 4 cups (400 gm) cake flour
  • 2 cups sugar (400 gm)
  • 2 tablespoons (30 gm) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks, 230 gm) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) buttermilk, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla

For the soak

  • 3/4 cup (180 mL) strong brewed coffee (warm or cold, doesn’t matter)
  • 1/4 cup (60 mL) Kahlua or coffee liquor
  • 12 teaspoons espresso powder (optional)

For the mascarpone whipped cream

  • 16 ounces (460 gm) mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • 8 ounces (230 gm) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (170 gm) powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Kahlua
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ cup (30 gm) cocoa powder

Instructions

To prepare the cake layers

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease three 8” round pans. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of each one for easy removal, if desired.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients until well dispersed, about 30 seconds. Add the softened butter and ¾ of the buttermilk to the dry ingredients. Keep the mixer on low until slightly combined and then increase to medium speed and beat for 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the rest of the buttermilk and one egg and beat on low for 30 seconds to incorporate. Add the additional egg and the vanilla and beat for another 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated batter.
  3. Spread the batter evenly among the three pans and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes. A toothpick inserted should come out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove from pan and remain cooling on a rack until room temperature. If you don’t plan to use the cakes immediately, wrap tightly in plastic wrap.

To prepare the soak

  1. Combine the coffee and coffee liquor in a small bowl. Taste the mixture. If it doesn’t have a strong coffee flavor, you can sprinkle in some of the espresso powder for an extra punch of coffee. If you would prefer a more mild coffee flavor, this is not necessary.

To prepare the mascarpone whipped cream

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a medium sized bowl, beat together the mascarpone cheese and cream cheese until combined and smooth, about 1-2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the powdered sugar and Kahlua and beat briefly to combine. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream until stiff peaks form. To do this, start the mixer on low and beat until the cream gets frothy. Increase the speed to high and beat until the whipping cream has barely thickened enough to stand up in straight peaks on its own. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture until smooth.

To assemble the cake

  1. Level all three cake layers using a serrated knife. (Note: I find it easiest to level cakes when they are still partially frozen.) Use a basting or pastry brush to “‘soak” each cake layer with the soak. Continue adding the coffee liquid to the cakes until they are well moistened, but not to where the coffee has dredged all the way through and has made the cake fall apart. You may not use all of the soak.
  2. On top of one soaked cake layer, spread about 1-1/4-1-1/2 cups of the mascarpone whipped cream and smooth out the top. Add an additional cake layer on top and repeat this process. Add the final cake layer to the top of the cake and spread a generous amount of whipped cream on top. Continue frosting the sides as well.
  3. You can allow the cake to chill and firm up in the fridge for a few hours if desired, or you can serve it immediately. I prefer to allow the cake to sit in the fridge so that the cake layers can continue to soften and soak up the coffee and the cream.
  4. Prior to serving, use a sifter to sprinkle some cocoa powder on top of the cake.

Notes

  • Notes: To prepare the cake as I did, as a naked cake, see the link in the post, or find the confetti ice cream cake in my blog archives. There are directions there for how to assemble a naked cake.
  • If you have another favorite recipe for a vanilla or white cake, feel free to substitute here.
  • If you choose not to prepare the cake in a “naked’ fashion, consider chilling the whipped cream in the fridge briefly so that it can firm up a bit. This will help keep the cream from just squishing out the sides when you stack your cakes.

Cake Recipe Adapted from: The Cake Bible

White Chocolate Cake

White Chocolate Cake Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Adapted from Rose Levy Beranbaum Cake Bible cake. A three layer, fluffy and moist white chocolate vanilla butter cake layers topped with a simple white chocolate cream cheese frosting. This cake is rich and sweet, perfect for special occasions, birthdays, weddings, etc. The golden layers stay fresh and soft for days. Find the Recipe at thewoodandspoon.com

Someone light the candles. Grab the champagne, pop the cork, maybe even grab a slice (or two!) of this white chocolate cake. Spare no piece of confetti or pinch of glitter, because today, ladies and gentlemen, we are celebrating.

IT’S MY ONE YEAR BLOGIVERSARY!

Yes, today this little blog is one year old, and every ounce of skin on my bones and butter in my belly is thrilled to have spent 365 days bantering recklessly with you. We’ve talked about baking and organizing and sharing gratitude. We had a baby together, went on trips together, and even rang in the new year. We shared about sisters that are cooler than us and the struggle of getting older, and I may overdone it on the amount of time I spent discussing my breasts (sorry about that.) This year has moved quickly, bringing bits of change, lots of love, and a whole bunch of cookies, and I’m honored that you were apart of it all.

I started this blog one year ago because I was tired of sitting on the sidelines. Countless people around me were taking chances, stepping into new adventures, and feeling their way through the exciting unknown of foreign territory. I read along with other bloggers, tried their recipes, chuckled at their words, and thought more than a dozen times, “Maybe I could do that.”

White Chocolate Cake

Fear kept me on the bench for a long time. The desire to create and write and have a seat at the table consumed my heart, but fear in the back of my mind told me that I couldn’t do it. That I didn’t have time. That I didn’t have a voice that was worth listening to.

If you’re reading these words today from the sidelines of your own world, I want to urge you to jump in. Make a list of your dreams, strategize, and go for it! Take your doubt and fear and any other person or thing that is holding you back and tell them to buzz off. You never known what kind of joy you’ll find when you finally step into something that you’re passionate about. You can’t predict how much your story might change when you decide to be the one who writes it.

The pages of this blog are humble and have a lot of room for improvement. But after 29 years, I finally have a space to do something that fulfills a part of me that was otherwise unsettled, and I’m so proud of that victory. So if you ever find yourself thinking, “Maybe I could do that,” I want to be the voice that tells you, “Yes! Yes, you can… You can and you should.”White Chocolate Cake

White Chocolate Cake

Much like the blog, this white chocolate cake is a labor of love. It’s appropriate for today because it’s maybe my favorite cake ever. If you’re not a huge fan of white chocolate, this cake might surprise you, and if you are a huge fan of white chocolate, this cake is bound to make your heart explode. A moist, buttery cake with the subtle warmth and sweetness of white chocolate, all covered in a tangy cream cheese frosting, this confection is memorable and unique, but still all together crowd pleasing. 

Admittedly, white chocolate is not always easy to work with. Melt it down at too high of a temperature and it will seize up; add it in to ingredients that are too cold and it will leave little little shards of cooled chocolate in your mixture. But if you give attention and love to the process, the result is an elegantly flavored cake that you won’t find in any average cake recipe. I encourage you to use a high quality baking white chocolate- one that you wouldn’t mind eating straight small bites of. The flavor of your chocolate bar makes a huge impact on the overall final outcome of the cake, so choose accordingly. 

White Chocolate Cake

White Chocolate Cake

I chose a cream cheese frosting for this white chocolate cake because I think it needed a tang to offset an otherwise sweet frosting. It’s not a super thick or stable frosting, so I wouldn’t recommend it for stacking enormously tall layer cakes. If you require a thicker frosting, say for piping or decorating, I would recommend experimenting with substituting butter in for some of the cream cheese and adding in a bit more powdered sugar. Alternatively, you can refrigerate your frosting prior to use and that will help to keep it a bit thicker. If you’ve ever had a cream cheese frosting fall apart and become loose and viscous while you were making it, it’s possible you overworked your cream cheese. Follow the instructions of the frosting recipe carefully to ensure you don’t overbeat your mixture, and I think you’ll be more than satisfied with the results. 

Friends, I am so thrilled to share this white chocolate cake with you, and even more excited about where this next year will take us. I absolutely love hearing from you, so please continue to comment and send me messages regarding recipes you like and want to see more of. March (how is it already MARCH!?!) is forecast to be super tasty in these parts, so once we wrap up this #monthofchocolate, you will be in for a treat. Consider this white chocolate cake next time you’re looking for an exceptional and extravagant way to celebrate one of life’s more beautiful moments, and please know that I am praying you get more than your fair share of them this year. Cheers to you and thank you for making this little corner of the internet a home for me.

 

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White Chocolate Cake

White Chocolate Cake Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Adapted from Rose Levy Beranbaum Cake Bible cake. A three layer, fluffy and moist white chocolate vanilla butter cake layers topped with a simple white chocolate cream cheese frosting. This cake is rich and sweet, perfect for special occasions, birthdays, weddings, etc. The golden layers stay fresh and soft for days. Find the Recipe at thewoodandspoon.com

 This is a white chocolate cake with two layers coated in a cream cheese buttercream. Perfect for a celebration, birthday, or party!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 2 hours
  • Category: Cakes
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake:

  • 6 ounces high quality white chocolate, chopped
  • 2 eggs, room temperature
  • 1 cup milk, room temperature
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 3 cups cake flour
  • 11/4 cups sugar
  • 11/2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 10 tablespoons (5 ounces) unsalted butter, room temperature

For the buttercream:

  • 12 ounces regular cream cheese, cut into large chunks
  • 8 ounces high quality white chocolate, chopped
  • 24 tablespoons (12 ounces) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3 cups powdered sugar

Instructions

To prepare the cake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and prepare 2-8” round cake pans by lining the bottom with a round of parchment paper and greasing the sides lightly with cooking spray.
  2. In a double boiler over low heat, melt the chocolate. Do not let the pan of water or the double boiler bowl get too hot because the white chocolate can scorch and seize up. Instead, allow the chocolate to melt gently. Once nearly melted, remove from the stove and allow it to continue melting. In a small bowl, combine the eggs, ¼ cup of the milk, and the vanilla, whisking gently to barely combine. In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt, stirring on low heat until well combined. Add the softened butter and the remaining ¾ cup of the milk, stirring on low speed until the dry ingredients are moistened, and then increase the speed to medium and beat for 1-1/2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the egg mixture in two batches, beating for 30 seconds after each addition. Scrape the sides of the bowl again and fold in any unincorporated ingredients that may have stuck to the sides of the bowl. Add the melted whie chocolate and beat on low just until combined. Scrape the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated batter. Spread the batter evenly in the two pans, smoothing out the top, and bake in the oven for about 25-35 minutes. The cakes will be done when a tooth pick inserted comes out clean.
  3. Allow the pans to cool on a wire rack for about 20 minutes and then remove the cakes from the pan. Allow to cool to room temp before frosting.

To prepare the buttercream:

  1. In a microwave-safe bowl, microwave the cream cheese until it is warmed, about 20-30 seconds. Add the chopped white chocolate and microwave for 20 seconds. Stir the cream cheese and chocolate and microwave for an additional 20 seconds. Stir again. If the white chocolate is not melted all the way, you can microwave for additional 15 second intervals, stirring often. Once melted and combined, all the mixture to cool slightly, either in the fridge or on the counter.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the butter on medium speed until lightly and fluffy, about 2-3 minutes. Add the powdered sugar and beat until well combined, about 1 minute. Scrape the sizes of the bowl and add the cooled white chocolate and cream cheese mixture, beating just until combined. Do not over beat and do not add the cream cheese until it is no longer warm. Scrape the sizes of the bowl to ensure all of the ingredients are adequately incorporated and then set aside while you prepare to frost your cake. If the frosting is too soft, allow to cool and firm up I the fridge for 30 minutes.

To assemble the cake:

  1. Spread a small amount of frosting on the bottom of an 8” cardboard cake round and place the first cake layer on top. Spread about 1 cup of frosting on top of the cake and spread evenly, pushing the frosting out to the edges of the cake and smoothing the top. Place the second cake layer on top and repeat the frosting process. Frost the cake with the remaining frosting to decorate as preferred.

Notes

  • White chocolate is extremely finicky. I cannot emphasize enough to be sure to not let it get too hot while melting it throughout this recipe. It will seize up. I typically let the water in my double boiler get hot, but not boiling, and take the pan on and off the heat while the chocolate melts. It seems like a lot of work but it is worth it to be delicate with it!
  • To make a cake like the one photographed in this blog post, bake your batter in 4-6” cake pans. If you have 6” cake pans with 3” or taller sides, you can bake the batter in three pans, but if not, the batter will overflow.
  • Before frosting cakes, I like to cut off any domed top that may have formed on the cake. Use a serrated knife to cut any rounded piece off the top. This will help you to have a neatly frosted cake.
  • I like to freeze my cake layers briefly before frosting. It helps to keep the crumbs from the cake getting mixed in the frosting.
  • While preparing the frosting, take care to not overbeat the cream cheese. Cream cheese that get overbeat will become loose and soupy. Once this happens, there is no fixing it.
  • If you frosting gets too warm, it will be difficult to work with. I recommend chilling it as needed while frosting the cake to make sure it stays cool enough.

Recipe adapted from: The Baking Bible

 

Adapted from: Rose Levy Beranbaum