maple syrup

Maple Bacon Scones

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

This is it, the eye of the proverbial hurricane. We are in the midst of those few short days sandwiched in between turkey feasts and Christmas morning- that time of year when the to-do lists are lengthy and daylight is fleeting. To help us survive, I’m sharing these maple bacon scones, a simple and comforting dish that we all can rally behind.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Last week was basically a grotesque parade of meals and cocktails and leftover turkey sandwiches. Don’t get me wrong- I like to eat just as much as the next person, but at some point, my gullet (and the button on my blue jeans) just scream, “NO MORE!” We started the week with a few dinners out with friends, and on Thursday morning, we fulfilled our American duty by demolishing the annual Thanksgiving feast. We ate an array of biscuits and green beans and casseroles, and because Thanksgiving lunch is the meal that keeps on giving, we later enjoyed turkey and bacon sandwiches. By Friday, I felt like I had eaten a baby or an entire bucket of KFC chicken. I felt like I had devoured three meals back to back at a Walt Disney World buffet and at any moment could burst in a disgusting explosion of gravy and cream of mushroom soup. My mother tells me this is a normal post-Thanksgiving feeling, but my Spanx would say otherwise. 

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Following our two-day binge fest, we traveled to Auburn, AL on Saturday to watch the Iron Bowl. For anyone who doesn’t live in Alabama or who couldn’t give two craps about college football (raises hand), the Iron Bowl is an annual football game between the University of Alabama and Auburn University. Being married to a rabid Auburn fan means that I participate in the festivities by eating chicken wings in my tailgate chair, drinking Crown Royale and Sprite from a gas station cup, and cheering at the game. While I am no more interested in football than I am, say, Nascar or an international chess match, I do enjoy attending with Brett because he loves it so much. Sometimes it’s fun to scream and clap and cheer like I know what I’m doing. Plus, someone has to be there to resuscitate Brett if he loses his mind on a poor call from the referee. 

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

So that brings us to today. Bloated, tired, and scratchy-throated, this girl is wiped out. I’m sticking with soup and salad for the foreseeable future, unless of course someone wants to bring me another turkey and bacon sandwich on some pumpkin bread, because that mess is delicious. But I digress. Before we dive head first into a powdered sugar cloud of cookies and cocoa and carols, let’s celebrate the last of this fall season with some warm and cozy maple bacon scones. 

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

With a tender crumb, crisp edges, and a delightfully sweet and salty flavor, these maple bacon scones are a dream of a breakfast food. My husband always says that everything is made better with bacon, and when it comes to these scones, I couldn’t agree more. The recipe was adapted from a new favorite, these chocolate coffee almond scones, and I was delighted that the butter-based treat transitioned from sweet to savory so seamlessly. I made and froze several batches throughout the testing process, and for weeks these maple bacon scones were toasted for a delightful breakfast that tasted fresh from the oven.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

To make these maple bacon scones, we start with the meats. Fry up some thick bacon of your choice (I prefer applewood smoked bacon) until crisp. Save the grease for another day and chop up the rest for the scones. Combine the dry ingredients, flour, seasoning, and baking powder, in a large bowl and cut in cold chunks of unsalted butter. Stir in the diced bacon before pouring in the heavy cream and maple syrup. Work quickly to combine the dough, but be sure to not overwork it. Pat it all out into a 1″ thick round and slice it into 8 wedges. Brush the whole thing with a little more heavy cream before baking in a hot preheated oven.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Fresh from the oven, these maple bacon scones are fragrant. Imagine the glorious smoke of bacon combined with the smell of homemade bread and maple syrup- it’s almost too good to describe. These maple bacon scones are indulgent and crowd-pleasing, the kind of thing you’ll want to serve at breakfasts and brunches in the coming months. Give this recipe a try and let me know what you think! They’re certainly worth making room in your belly for. 

If you like these maple bacon scones, you should check out:

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Apple Cake

Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches with Pepper Bacon and Cheddar

 

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Maple Bacon Scones

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

These maple bacon scones are a sweet and salty favorite to serve at breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 8 1x
Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ cup (113 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • 1 cup cooked, finely chopped crispy bacon
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) maple syrup
  • ¾ cup (180 mL) whipping cream, plus additional for brushing

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, pepper, and onion powder. Use a pastry cutter or the back of two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until pea-sized clumps are throughout. Stir in the bacon. Combine the maple syrup and the whipping cream in a separate bowl and then stir into the dry ingredients, just until evenly incorporated. If a lot of dry ingredients remain in the bottom of the bowl you can add an additional tablespoon of cream, but be sure to not add too much liquid.
  2. Pat the dough out in a ¾” thick circle and place the dough round on a parchment lined baking pan in the freezer to chill for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  3. Once the dough is chilled, cut the dough into 8 wedges but leave the circle of pieces together. Use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of whipping cream over the scones. Bake in the oven until golden brown around the edges of each scone, about 35 minutes.

Notes

Chilling the dough ensures the scones will rise well. You can skip this step but it isn’t recommended for best outcomes.

Loosely adapted from King Arthur Flour

Maple Apple Cake

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

There should have been maple apple cake. Yes, a birthday can be well-celebrated without stacked autumnal desserts, but if you only turn thirty once, shouldn’t it include the best tasting cake of the year? If you’re celebrating a birthday anytime soon, don’t make my mistake- make sure your party includes this cake.

As you get older, birthdays get kinda weird. Sometimes it feels a little uncomfortable to let people celebrate you the way they might have in your teens or early twenties. There’s usually a million other things to do and a dwindling list of friends who are available to celebrate.  Sometimes there are kids involved, which makes the idea of planning any party that you can’t buy in a hyper-themed box set from Target seem like a huge waste of time. Energy, as with most other things in adulthood, is a limiting factor here too, because who actually wants to plan or order one more thing, particularly if it can’t be done from the convenience of the Amazon app on your phone?

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

It feels right to celebrate other people. I’m the first one to volunteer a cake or a bubbly cocktail when a friend’s birthday rolls around. I have stacks of birthday cards just waiting to be personalized and delivered to the people I love. But while I adore birthdays or any other excuse for confetti and  balloons, there’s a little bit of pride that gets in the way when it comes to celebrating myself. Isn’t that gross?

On one hand, I don’t want to be the self-centered fool who says, “Look at me, look at me, it’s my birthday! Buy me a crown and make me a cake, minion!” But on the other hand, I kinda like the idea of rolling up to my own birthday party feeling like Beyonce- a posse of girlfriends, popped bottles, and self-assured sass in tow. Even the most modest of people have to admit that there’s nothing like being the birthday queen. Candles and champagne, confetti and cheers make even the most conservative human feel like the million bucks they deserve to be on the annual recognition of their birth. Is there anything wrong with wanting to feel the love?

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

This year, I felt celebrated. My girlfriends changed a scheduled meeting into an impromptu birthday party and my family traveled north to celebrate with presents and pie. My husband treated me to several thoughtful birthday happies, and it didn’t hurt that we wound up in Chicago for my big day. Gifts and cake and cards are fine, but the best part of a birthday is being loved on by the people you love back; no amount of Beyonce can top that feeling.

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

My one regret this year is that I didn’t get to eat this maple apple cake.

I want this cake to be my birthday cake. This is the kind of dessert I want to eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. As heinous it is to admit, I want to frost my entire face with the maple buttercream from this cake and casually lick it off all day long. If that makes me a disgusting human, I frankly do not care. 

Three rounds of buttermilk cake layered with a syrupy, fresh apple filling and candied nuts, this maple apple cake is a stunner and nothing short of indulgent. The buttercream is sweetened with brown sugar and maple syrup, the perfect addition to such a fall-tasting cake. If warm flavors, fresh fruit, and the optional addition of bourbon sounds like a winning combination to you, this maple apple cake just may be the stuff your dreams are made of.

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

To prepare it, we start by baking up some cake layers. I decided the added tang of buttermilk would help to offset some of the cake’s sweetness, so I adapted a favorite recipe from this cake. The cake layers can be baked ahead, wrapped, and frozen, making day of cake assembly fairly simple. The apple filling is also a make-ahead item, consisting of fresh apples, butter, and brown sugar. If your adult palate is so inclined, try out this maple apple cake with a bit of bourbon added to the filling. Even though the alcohol cooks off, those warm bourbon flavors remain and even the least discerning tastebuds will be able to tell that this cake has a punch of something special.

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

On the day you plan to assemble the cake, prepare your maple frosting, level your cakes, and begin stacking. The apple filling is pooled between cake layers with a dam of frosting and is sprinkled with a handful of chopped candied nuts. Roasted nuts can be substituted here, but certainly a party cake like this deserves the pizazz of caramelized sugar. This maple apple cake will keep well in the fridge for a few days, but unless you’re eating it all by yourself, I can almost guarantee it won’t last that long.

I’m sharing today’s maple apple cake along with a number of other apple recipes prepared by a few blogger friends for the #aisforapples party. If you’re dying to use up all of that October produce, be sure to check out the other recipes listed below. Many thanks to Rebecca, Ruth, and Annie for rallying the troops in this apple extravaganza. Give this maple apple cake a try and celebrate your people well this week. Happy Thursday and happy fall, ya’ll!Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this maple apple cake, be sure to try:

Caramel Apple Pie

Apple Crumb Cake

Apple Crisp Ice Cream

Breakfast Danish

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits 

 

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Maple Apple Cake

Maple Apple Cake Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a 3 layer buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple brown sugar buttercream frosting. This is the perfect party cake for fall and is a great way to use up fresh apples. Get tips and how to on making stacking, frosting, and filling layered cakes. Find the recipe and inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com

This maple apple cake is three layers of buttermilk cake filled with a bourbon apple pie filling, candied nuts, and maple buttercream. 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the apple filling:

  • 2 cups (230 gm) peeled and ¼-1/2” diced apples
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup (115 gm) brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice or good quality bourbon

For the cake:

  • 21/2 cups (325 gm) cake flour
  • 21/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 11/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup (225 gm) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup (200 gm) sugar
  • ¾ cup (165 gm) packed brown sugar
  • 4 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) buttermilk
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla

For the maple buttercream:

  • 2 cups (450 gm) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (100 gm) brown sugar
  • 41/2 cups (510 gm) powdered sugar
  • 1/3 cup (205 gm) maple syrup
  • 1 cup chopped candied pecans (optional)

Instructions

To prepare the apple filling:

  1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, cook the butter, stirring continuously until it melts and barely begins to turn golden brown.  Immediately add the apples and stir to combine. Add the remaining ingredients, bring to a simmer, and cook for 5 minutes or until the juices have thickened slightly and the apples have barely softened.  Remove the filling to a heat-safe bowl and cool completely prior to using.

To prepare the cake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease the sides and line the bottoms of 3-8” round cake pans with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the cake flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside.
  3. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter, sugar, and brown sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl with a spatula and add each egg one at a time on low speed, mixing just until combined. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add about 1/3 of the dry ingredients followed by the vanilla and about half of the buttermilk. Mix until combined and then repeat this process once more, finishing by adding the last third of the dry ingredients. Scrape the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated bits of batter.
  4. Distribute the batter evenly among the three pans and bake in the preheated oven 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Allow to cool completely prior to assembling cake.

To prepare the maple buttercream:

  1. Cream the butter in the bowl of a stand mixer or a large mixing bowl on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the brown sugar and cream for an additional minute. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the confectioner’s sugar. Mix on low speed until incorporated and then drizzle in the maple syrup. Beat on medium speed until well combined. If needed, add a bit of water to thin out frosting or add a bit more powdered sugar to thicken up. You can also briefly place the frosting in the fridge to firm up as needed.  

To assemble the cake:

  1. Use a serrated knife to level the cakes. Smooth a small amount of frosting on an 8” cake board or plate and center a single cake layer on top. Smooth a thin layer of frosting on top of the cake layer. Using a piping bag (see notes) fitted with a large round tip, pipe a dam around the outer rim of the top of the cake. The dam should be at least ¼-1/2” tall to prevent the apple filling from squirting out the sides. Spread approximately half of the apple filling inside the dam and sprinkle with about 1/3 of the nuts. Pipe a bit of frosting on top of the apple filling to help the next layer of cake stick. Stack the second cake layer on top and repeat the entire process once more. Place the final cake layer on top. Spread a thin coat of frosting (crumb coat) all over the cake and allow it to set up in the fridge prior to applying the final coat of frosting. You can skip this step if desired. Decorate the top of the cake with a few nuts and extra frosting, if desired. Cake will keep in the refrigerator covered in plastic for up to three days.

Notes

  • If you don’t have a piping bag, you can place 1-1/2 cups of frosting in a freezer Ziploc bag. Seal the bag and snip one of the corners off the end of the bag and use that to pipe frosting.
  • You can substitute different varieties of berries here, but the amount of sugar needed in the filling will differ based on which berry you choose. Adjust according to your preference.

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Our weekends deserve new life, don’t you think? I say we find a reason to get excited about the mornings again- something to pair with that strong cup of coffee and cream. These maple oatmeal biscuits are weekend warriors, making a delicious statement every time they emerge from the oven. If you’re as into making weekends great again as I am, let’s just agree to start here.

I can remember the days when weekends were saving grace. Monday and Tuesday would thunder into Friday with an onslaught of assignments and tests and premature gray hairs. Grades and deadlines loomed around every corner, so the primary sanctuary from the stress of school were those bookend days of the week. There’s not a teenager alive who doesn’t wait for the weekends with the same anticipation as they do the recess bell. It’s just science.Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

But in adulthood, Saturday and Sunday don’t care. It doesn’t matter that you worked hard all week or that you’re desperate for a break. The weekend isn’t impressed by what you accomplished Monday through Friday because there are groceries to buy, lawns to mow, and cars to clean. Adulthood takes hostage those few hours of weekend solace and ransoms them for nine bags of raked leaves, an unloaded dishwasher, and few hours worth of ironing. It’s savage.

You notice I haven’t even mentioned children yet. In the BC years (that’s the “before children” years), weekends might have at least included thirty extra minutes for a second cup of coffee. There would be time for blown-dry hair and a pre-dinner cocktail, maybe even an hour for catching up on your DVR. Let’s pour one out in remembrance, shall we?

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comWeekends with kids are a different animal. There are bottles to warm and sippy cups to refill. Kids are not concerned about you reading the paper because kids want their Cheerios. Kids want to go to the park. Kids want to remove all of the plastic cups from the cupboard, litter them throughout the house, and then poop their pants while you’re in the middle of cleaning it all up. 

My kids like to spend the weekends begging for junk food and television. Saturday is their favorite day to to skip naps and pee in their shoes. On the weekends, you’ll find my kids stealing television remotes and car keys, hiding them in places Dad is sure to never find them (read: the toilet; see also: the trash can.) 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comI have this dream where I wake up on a Saturday after seven o’clock. Alas, my family is all awake, and they have been patiently waiting for me to wake up. They teeter into my room with a warm coffee and breakfast tray in tow, complete with warm maple oatmeal biscuits and extra butter to boot. (Remember, I said this was a dream.)

These maple oatmeal biscuits might save your weekend. They won’t change a fifteenth diaper or freshen up a gone-cold mug of coffee, but they are good enough to add some luster to the weekend. A one-bowl dish that freezes like magic and reheats like a dream, these maple oatmeal biscuits are the rising star of the weekend, and you need them in your life. 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

We start by tossing together a few dry ingredients- flour, sugar, the usual suspects. Oats are next, which account for the extra fluffy, slightly nutty flavor that we wind up with once the maple oatmeal biscuits have baked. Ice cold butter is incorporated throughout before the dairy and a heavy-handed pour of maple syrup brings the dough together. 

For the best success with these maple oatmeal biscuits, work quickly  to ensure that they enter the oven with chunks of chilled butter throughout. Handle the dough as little as possible so that they stay airy and fluffy, and use a floured cutter to trim out rounds, pressing straight down without any twist. I like to brush my biscuit tops with a little extra cream or butter for browning, but I think a simple painting of maple syrup would be perfectly sufficient here as well. You decide.

I think we should bake back the wonder into our weekends. Make these maple oatmeal biscuits as a means of celebrating the good Saturday and Sunday have to offer, and I promise you that things will start looking up. Happy week to you all!

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these maple oatmeal biscuits, you should check out:

Buttermilk Biscuits

Honey Nut Biscuits

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Peach Crumb Muffins

 

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Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These maple oatmeal biscuits are soft, layered, Southern-style biscuits sweetened with maple syrup. Perfect for breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the biscuits:

  • 3 cups (390 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup (50 gm) brown sugar, packed
  • 21/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 cup (90 gm) old fashioned oats
  • 11 tablespoons (155 gm) butter, cold and diced into tablespoon-sized chunks
  • 1 cup (240 mL) milk (whole or 2%)
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) maple syrup

For topping:

  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 415 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper.
  2. Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Stir in the oats. Use a pastry cutter or the back of a fork to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it is reduced to pea-sized clumps.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the milk and maple syrup. Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients and butter and fold just until combined.
  4. Turn the mixture out onto a floured surface. Gently pat together, but be careful not to overwork. Pat out to 1” thickness and then fold in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and then repeat this patting and folding process. Repeat once more for a total of 3 sets of folds. Pat the dough out to 1” thickness and use a floured biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Gently pat together the remnants and cut out more biscuits.
  5. Combine the melted butter and remaining maple syrup together and brush over the tops of the biscuits. Bake in the preheated oven for about 12-15 minutes, or until the tops are golden brown.

Notes

  • Be sure to use very cold butter and milk. Butter and milk that is not cold enough can prevent your biscuits from rising well.
  • Do not overwork your dough at any phase of the preparation.
  • The folding of the dough helps to create flaky layers within the biscuit, but is not necessary if you don’t care about this.
  • For flakiest layers, use a sharp biscuit cutters and push straight down into the dough. Refrain from twisting the cutter as you insert it into the dough as this can cause the edges to seal off and keep from rising well.
  • To reheat biscuits, toast in a toaster oven until fragrant.