mascarpone

Classic Tiramisu

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Friday, Y’all! I’m writing to you on what is actually Sunday because my fam jam and I are traveling to the most magical place on earth this weekend: Disney World. Yes, I fall into the small category of native Floridians who actually *love* Disney, and it is my biggest joy as a Mom to get to share that experience with my own kids. In lieu of a long, drawn-out post, I have a banging recipe and few favorite things to share with you this morning. Stay tuned for the classic tiramisu recipe and settle in for a some links to my late-winter faves!

A Favorite Read:
I love this article from Bon Appetit. As a food blogger, I get tons of questions about substitutions. Can I sub oil for butter here? Would brown sugar work in place of granulated? What if I don’t have baking soda?! Sometimes there are some simple substitutions that can be easily made, but often you just gotta stick with the recipe. This article from Bon Appetit speaks to those substitutions and why, if in doubt, you just need to follow the recipe. Enjoy the read!

A Favorite Beauty Find:
Anyone else feeling straight-up pasty this time of year? By the time February rolls around, I have been absent from the sun for, like, ever and am in desperate need of a freshening up. I don’t love to wear a ton of makeup, so this CC Cream (that means Color Correcting Cream!) is a perfect option for me. It’s a tinted moisturizer with SPF 35 and foundation properties that keep skin looking smooth and flawless. I wear just a few dabs of it under my blush and it has completely taken care of any postpartum redness and dark eye circles that I had before. Bonus: this is a clean(er) skincare line, so you can feel good about using it. Find the shade that works for you and give it a try!

A Favorite Thing to Wear:
Mom confession: I live in athletic clothes. If I happen upon a day that I actually have to wear a pair of pants that buttons, it’s truly hard times. Enter these fun rainbow sneakers. They’re the happiest little shoe I’ve ever worn and they totally help ease the transition from workout clothes to comfy casual. If I’m not wearing my Nikes or slippers, it’s these little guys 100%. This is one of my favorite shoes brands, so I hope you find something you love too!

A Favorite New Cookbook:
A sweet friend I’ve followed on social media for ages has just released a cookbook that is awe-inspiring and stunning. Julie Jones is a trained chef across the pond who is known for her intricate pies, tarts, and other baked goods. From following her, I know she is also a lovely human with a big heart. Her book reflects all of those qualities, and I am happy to add it to my collection. Check out the publication here!

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

A Favorite Classic Tiramisu:
Classic tiramisu is a recipe I never tire of. The creamy texture and hints of cocoa and espresso throughout play together to create a comforting, almost seductive recipe that is unlike any other. When I am craving a classic tiramisu, there is simply nothing else that will satisfy. It’s unique and 100% its own.

What I love more than anything about this Italian dessert is the ease with which it comes together and the fact that it is a make-ahead option fit for a crowd. This recipe is sufficient to serve up to 10 and you can prepare and store it in your fridge up to two days in advance. Does that make this classic tiramisu the perfect option for these end-of-winter dinner parties and candlelit gatherings? Yep. I recently made a couple of dishes of it for a Valentine’s Day gathering I had with friends and received rave reviews. (Disclaimer: my friends are not above stroking my ego, so if they lied and this dessert actually sucks you can blame them, okay?) For a small portion, feel free to halve this recipe. You can also prepare this is several individual dishes, just be sure to use smaller pieces of the ladyfingers to fit in whatever container you opt for. I love the idea of making this in tiny glass trifle dishes so that you can see the little layers before you dive in! Plus, everyone loves an individual dessert just for themselves. It definitely ups the fancy factor.

Give this classic tiramisu a try this weekend and let me know what you think! In the meantime, follow along on my Instagram to see BTS footage of the kids at Disney this weekend. If our last trip was any indication, this one is sure to be a hoot. Happy Friday and have a great weekend!

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this classic tiramisu you should try:

Cookie Butter Mousse
Tiramisu Cream Puffs
Tiramisu Cake
Caramelized Banana Pudding
Chocolate Budino

Print

Classic Tiramisu

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

This classic tiramisu features Kahlua and coffee soaked ladyfingers, a whipped mascarpone filling, and loads of chocolate flavor. 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Total Time: 60
  • Yield: 9 Servings 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup warm espresso or strong-brewed coffee
  • 2 tablespoons Kahlua or rum/coffee liquor
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 16 ounces mascarpone cheese
  • 11/2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • 24+ ladyfingers (I used about 28 in my dish but will differ depending on what size you choose. Hard or soft Cookies is just fine !)

Instructions

  1. Combine the espresso and kahlua in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks and sugar together until thickened and pale, about 4 minutes. When a beater or spatula dipped into the mixture is removed it should gradually pour off in a thin, viscous ribbon. Add the mascarpone and beat on low till combined. Set aside. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream and vanilla on medium speed to stiff peaks. Fold the whipped cream into the egg yolk mixture until smooth and fluffy, being careful not to overwork. Set it aside.
  3. When you’re ready to assemble the tiramisu, dust the bottom of your serving dish with a layer of cocoa powder, about 1-1/2 teaspoons. Working quickly and carefully, dip your lady fingers into the coffee kahlua mixture and arrange them in a single layer in the bottom of your dusted dish. You want to fill in any larger holes but don’t worry about breaking up your ladyfingers to squeeze them into tiny holes. Spread half of the cream mixture on top of the lady fingers and dust the cream with another layer of cocoa powder. Repeat your process with another layer of ladyfingers, cream, and cocoa powder. Allow to set up in the fridge for at least an hour before serving. Alternatively, you can prepare this up to a day or two in advance, keeping covered and stored in the fridge.

Notes

  1. If you don’t have espresso, you can brew EXTRA STRONG coffee or stir some espresso powder into your warm coffee.
  2. Soft ladyfingers will be quick to fall apart in the coffee mixture, so work quickly! If you’re into a strong coffee flavor, you can also brush the tops of the ladyfingers with the coffee mixture after they’re been placed in the pan. 
  3. Using raw eggs totally freaks people out- I get it. Opt for fresh farm eggs or pasteurized to be on the safe side.

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

We’re totally in it- the thick of summer. A time for short shorts and frozen beverages. The days that smell like coconut sunscreen and salty hair. We’ve been indoor cats this summer, spending most of our daylight hours swaddling our new little babe in muslin and morning light, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t enjoy some of the best these months have to offer. In an effort to settle into the summer spirit, I’ve made a super tasty frozen treat that I think captures summer flavors at their finest: blueberry mascarpone ice cream. Let’s dive in.

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

Ice cream is always a favorite of mine. I love the variety of flavors and textures you can achieve and adore having a dessert that keeps in the freezer. Here, a creamy and mild vanilla mascarpone base is swirled with a quick stovetop blueberry sauce and little crumbles of Biscoff cookies. The end result is a flavor and texture that reminds me of a fruit crisp topped with loads of ice cream, aka, absolutely delicious.

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.comBlueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

To make this blueberry mascarpone ice cream, we start with the ice cream base. Milk is warmed and whisked into egg yolks and sugar before the whole mixture is cooked together. Mascarpone cheese and a pinch of salt is added next, and the creamy mixture is allowed to chill until it is room temperature. Chilling the mixture prevents overchurning and also makes for a creamier bite. The blueberry sauce is nothing more than fresh berries cooked down on the stove with sugar. Once the mixture is thickened and the berries have burst, remove from the heat and allow it to cool completely. 

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

This blueberry mascarpone ice cream can be churned in your ice cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Mine usually takes about 20 minutes to whip up. Once it’s thickened to the consistency of frozen yogurt, turn your machine off and begin layering the mixture with swirls of the blueberry sauce and cookie crumbles. I like to store my ice cream in metal loaf pans, but any freezer-safe container will work. It won’t last too long anyways- it’s too delicious!

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

If your July has yet to include an oversized scoop of homemade ice cream, I hope you’ll give this blueberry mascarpone ice cream a whirl. It’s among some of my favorite treats I’ve enjoyed this year, and I think you’ll love it too. Happy Tuesday and enjoy!

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this blueberry mascarpone ice cream you should try:

Samoa Ice Cream

Cherry Chip Ice Cream

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream

Vegan Coconut Lime Ice Cream Pie

Apple Crisp Ice Cream

Print

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream

Blueberry Mascarpone Ice Cream this is a frozen dessert adapted from Daniel Humm made with mascarpone cheese and vanilla bean. There is a biscoff cookie (speculoos cookie butter) crumb and a blueberry sauce swirled throughout to give this ice cream a berry crisp flavor. Find the recipe for this ice cream machine recipe and learn how to make it homemade on thewoodandspoon.com

This blueberry mascarpone ice cream feature a blueberry stovetop sauce and a biscoff cookie crumble in a vanilla bean mascarpone cheese base!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Total Time: 240
  • Yield: 1 Quart 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the ice cream base (adapted from Daniel Humm):

  • 2 cups (480 gm) whole milk
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • ¾ cup (150 gm) sugar
  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese
  • Pinch of salt

For the filling:

  • 1 cup blueberries
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 ounces of crumbled Biscoff cookies (graham crackers or crunchy oatmeal cookies can be substituted in a pinch)

Instructions

To prepare the ice cream base:

  1. Combine the milk and 2 tablespoons of the sugar in a medium saucepan over low heat. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally. In the meantime, combine the egg yolks and the remaining sugar in a bowl and whip with a hand mixer on medium speed until fluffy, about 3 minutes. Once the milk mixture has come to a simmer, carefully add 1 cup of the warm milk into the egg mixture in a slow and steady stream, whisking all the while, over the course of 30 seconds. Don’t add it all at once or you’ll risk scrambling the eggs. Once the milk has been added, pour the mixture back into the saucepan with the remaining milk and cook over medium-low heat while stirring constantly until the mixture barely thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon (about 4-5 minutes). Don’t let the mixture boil. Pull the saucepan off the heat and whisk in the mascarpone and salt until incorporated.
  2. Strain the custard into a gallon-sized plastic bag and seal it. Place the bag in a sink filled with ice and cold water to help the mixture chill quickly. Alternatively, you can strain the mixture in a bowl and allow it to chill more slowly in the fridge. Once the mixture has chilled, process the ice cream in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions, usually about 20 minutes. Once prepared, spread the custard into a loaf pan alternating with drizzles of the blueberries and crumbled cookies. I like to do three separate layers of custard and top each with a hefty amount of blueberry sauce and cookie crumbles. Swirl gently with a knife and then allow to freeze completely in the freezer. Enjoy!

To prepare the filling:

  1. Combine the blueberries and sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer until the sauce has thickened slightly. Remove from heat to cool completely prior to use.

Rhubarb Shortcakes

Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These past few weeks have been a whirlwind of wonderful, but can I just say that I am exhausted? After a few weeks of living out of a suitcase, nothing brings me more joy than to write to you all today from the comfort of my desk at home. The world is beautiful with a million and one delicious and exciting things to offer, but like Dorothy said, there’s no place like home.Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Sometimes I laugh at how attached to this home I’ve become. It wasn’t long ago that the thought of a lifetime spent in the deep Southern confines of Selma, Alabama was terrifying to me. Even to this day, my friends from my pre-Selma days don’t understand how I’ve eased into this life so comfortably. I imagine that the simplicity and slow pace of a small town probably appears lackluster to some outsiders looking in, but I’ve learned that this kind of life can shine pretty vibrantly if you’re willing to settle in and polish it. 

Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Are you in a similar phase of life? Have you found yourself in a chapter of your story that you never really imagined for yourself? Are you searching for purpose in a season that you maybe haven’t quite figured out? 

I want to encourage you by saying that there’s so much hope. There’s silver in the rough edges of our lives if we’re willing to hunt it out, and there’s purpose and joy even in the stories that we wouldn’t have written for ourselves. I have been on the receiving end of so much love and connection and fun- rich relationships and moments that I would have missed out on if I had remained closed to them. My decision to lean into the unknown and choose joy in the life that we had was one of the most valuable choices I have made, and I hope you’re in a place to make it too. Be at home wherever you find yourself.

Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

There’s a lot to love about these rhubarb shortcakes. The cakes, tender and layered, make a perfect vehicle for toppings. The rhubarb, roasted until syrupy and sweet, provides a fragrance and tang that not other fruit can. And the mascarpone whipped cream is straight up manna from heaven- creamy, sweet perfection.Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

To make these rhubarb shortcakes, we start with the cakes! This recipe was adapted from my jam-filled scones, so expect as much when you make them. Butter is cut into the dry ingredients until there are pea-sized clumps throughout. The heavy whipping cream gets poured in to bring the dough together. We pat out the mixture onto a floured surface and use our biscuit folding technique to achieve tall, flaky layers. Bake the cakes in the oven while you prep the rhubarb.

Trim the ends and any rough spots off of your rhubarb stalks and cut them into 2-3″ pieces. Toss them with sugar and fresh split vanilla beans or vanilla bean paste. Roast in a preheated oven until the juices run thick and the rhubarb is tender to a fork.

 

Finally, for the mascarpone cream, beat the mascarpone and sugar together until smooth. Slowly drizzle in the whipping cream until it is incorporated smoothly and beat on medium-high speed until it is cloud-like and fluffy. Store in the fridge while you assemble your rhubarb shortcakes.

Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

To serve, split the warm cakes in two and top with several rhubarb pieces. Allow the cake to soak of some of the excess juices- SO GOOD. Top with a giant dollop (or two) of the mascarpone whipped cream and replace the lid of the cake.

These rhubarb shortcakes are simple and no frills, but entirely impressive to eat. The flavors combine really nicely and make for a delightful summertime treat. Give them a try and I think you’ll agree. If you love them as much as I do, I hope you’ll tell me about it in the comments section below. Happy Thursday and Happy Baking!

If you like these rhubarb shortcakes you should check out:

Strawberry Shortcakes

Strawberry Almond Skillet Cake

Berry Rhubarb Tart

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

 

Print

Rhubarb Shortcakes

Rhubarb Shortcakes by The Wood and Spoon blog. These are scone like biscuits topped with a roasted rhubarb and vanilla bean and whipped mascarpone cream. The cakes are tender and layered and flaky, while the fruit is sweet and tangy. This is a great way to use up rhubarb and is a great summer dessert for a party. Read more about the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These rhubarb shortcakes are sweet, tangy, and entirely delicious! A tender scone is topped with roasted vanilla bean rhubarb and a mascarpone whipped cream. Perfect for summer desserts!

  • Author: Kate Wood
Scale

Ingredients

For the shortcakes:

  • 21/2 cups (325 gm) all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar, plus more for sprinkling
  • 11/2 tablespoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup (113 gm) unsalted butter, cold
  • 1 cup (240 gm) heavy whipping cream, plus more for brushing

For the roasted rhubarb:

  • 11/2 pounds rhubarb, ends trimmed and stalks cut into equal-sized 2-3” chunks
  • 11/2 cups (300 gm) light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste or extract

For the mascarpone cream:

  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese, room temperature but still cool
  • ¼ cup (30 gm) powdered sugar
  • 1 cup (240 gm) heavy whipping cream

Instructions

To prepare the shortcakes:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees and line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment.
  2. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Use a pastry cutter or the backs of two forks to cut in the butter until it takes on a sandy consistency with pea-sized clumps throughout. Add the heavy cream and fold until a dough comes together.
  3. Pat the dough out into a 1” thick rectangle and then fold in thirds like you’d fold a letter to put into an envelope. Pat the dough out to 1” thickness again and use a knife to cut the dough into 8 equal sized pieces. If desired, you can use a 2-1/2” round biscuit cutter, but this is unnecessary. Place the shortcakes on a baking sheet snuggled up to one another, and use a pastry brush to apply a thin layer of heavy cream on their tops. Sprinkle with sugar, decrease the oven’s heat to 400 degrees and bake the shortcakes until golden brown, about 25 minutes. Allow to cool prior to serving.

To prepare the roasted rhubarb:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 (or lower oven temp after baking shortcakes).
  2. Toss the rhubarb pieces, brown sugar, and vanilla bean paste together in a 9”x13” baking dish. Roast the rhubarb, tossing occasionally, for about 20 minutes or until the rhubarb is tender and the sugar has all dissolved. Allow to cool slightly prior to serving.

To prepare the mascarpone cream:

  1. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the mascarpone and powdered sugar until smooth, about 1 minute. Drizzle in a bit of the cream and beat briefly to combine. Repeat this process a few times until the cheese has been thinned out to a loose, smooth consistency. Add the remaining cream and beat on medium-high speed until the cream has fluffed up to a whipped cream consistency and medium-stiff peaks have formed.

To serve the shortcakes:

  1. Split each warm shortcake in half and top each bottom half with a few stalks of roasted rhubarb. Top the rhubarb with a generous dollop of cream and replace the top to the shortcake. Serve immediately!

Notes

This recipe makes large servings. Feel free to make smaller scones. If so, the recipe will serve 10-12

Honey Mascarpone Tart with Figs and Salty Graham Cracker Crust

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

I know. You’re just dying to read all about this sassy little honey mascarpone tart that requires less than 10 ingredients and 30 minutes to prep. But first, I thought I’d spend a minute talking about making a home in a new city.

When I moved to Selma, it was a culture shock. I’d moved around a good bit throughout my life, planting roots in upstate New York, rural Kentucky, and even central Florida, but not even my decade in Birmingham could prepare me for the small town life that awaited me in lower Alabama. The town of less than 20,000 operated at a slower, more relaxed pace of life. No Starbucks, no Whole Foods, no movie theatre. Most of the people I met had lived there pretty much their whole life, and in a sea of new faces, I sweat under the heat of being the new kid.

I felt kinda like a square peg in a town filled with round holes. People were warm and inviting, but the level of kindness and hospitality around me was intimidating. I didn’t feel polite enough or talkative enough or Southern enough to fit in. I talked different and dressed different, listened to different music. I wasn’t outdoorsy, I didn’t fry chicken, and I couldn’t give two craps about who won the Iron Bowl. I felt like an outsider.

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

Normal, social people, maybe ones with fewer insecurities and fears than I had, would have embraced the change. They probably would have welcomed the kindness and warmth that this small community shared so generously. They would have jumped at the chance to be known, to belong.

But to be frank, it scared the mess out of me. I didn’t like the constant show of new faces and I missed the quick runs to Target and my favorite Thai restaurant. I cried in the shower and avoided going to the supermarket because I knew I would be met with unfamiliar faces and awkward conversation. I felt like I had amnesia, like I was lost in a foreign land and I didn’t know who or where I was.

Instead of dealing with it, I pushed back. I cut my hair and put on my best yankee accent. I turned my nose up to the beautiful tastes and sounds that were all around me, retreating to things that were more familiar- throwback playlists on my iPod,  old Converse sneakers, and recipes that reminded me of home. I desperately wanted my own identity, one that wasn’t just “Brett’s wife,” or “the new girl from Orlando.”

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

One day at work, I had a patient ask me how my transition to Selma was going. Obnoxiously, I cleared my throat and with an eye roll or two, I told him that my new life was harder than I thought it would be. The change was more than I expected. I’m honestly not sure what else was said in the conversation, or if I even responded with the grace that man deserved, but what plays clear as black and white in the reel of my memories is the look on his face and the gentle words that came next: “My Mama always told me, ‘Blossom where you’re planted.’ I sure hope you take the chance to bloom here, ma’am.”

Those words affected me. They exposed a stubborn seed of pride in my heart that was unwilling to bend for my new home in any way. I was so busy with my self-deprecation and mourning the loss of outlet malls that I forget to look for the silver lining. I failed to seek out the gold in Selma, the gold in its people.Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

A lot has transpired in the four year since that day. I won’t say much about it now, but what I will share is that Selma has become a home. There are roots now, woven snug to some of the most intimate parts of who I am. Roots that connect me to memories of my children, new smells and flavors, and faces of people who have become “forever friends.” There’s buds here, signs of new life and growth, and I’m certain now more than ever that Selma is the soil I want to blossom in.

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.comEvery summer since moving to Selma, I’ve found myself with a basket of figs. My father-in-law has a gigantic fig tree at his home, so when the tree’s fruit ripens, I strap on some boots and sweat, sweat, sweat for the love of sweet summer fruit. Preserves come first, and we enjoy that bounty all year round on toast and biscuits, even inside some sweet little pop-tarts that I plan to share with you all next month. This year, I made a few extra trips to pick figs and this honey mascarpone tart is the result.

A simple, 8 ingredient tart, requiring less than 30 minutes of prep work and zero use of the oven, this honey mascarpone tart is a beautiful vehicle for late summer’s freshest fruits. I’ve chosen to pair mine with figs, but I think any cherry, peach, or berry would find themselves more than at home on this little beauty.

To make this honey mascarpone tart, we start by preparing the crust. Salty, soft, and unabashedly buttery, the graham cracker crust here is anything but subtle. It is the perfect match for the creamy, lightly sweetened cream and fresh figs. A simple stir of graham cracker crumbs, butter, salt, and brown sugar and you’re halfway there to creating the best no-bake honey graham crust a gal could ask for. Press the crumbs into the removable bottom of a tart pan and let the whole thing chill up in the fridge.

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

Next, make the filling. Mascarpone cheese, honey, and brown sugar are the main stars here. After combining all three, fold in some whipped cream and spread it into the chilled crust. At that point, the honey mascarpone tart could really be finished. I could easily polish off the entire thing over the course of a few nights without even blinking an eye. Instead, let’s decorate it with some fresh summer fruit, a handful of pistachios, and a drizzle of honey because YOLO, okay?

This honey mascarpone tart feels special. It feels like a dessert worth celebrating over, and yet, it’s just a few simple ingredients that shine their brightest when paired together. Light and fresh, a chilled slice of this honey mascarpone tart is just the ticket on these warm summer nights we’re having. It’s easy enough for a weeknight at home, decadent enough to raise a toast to.

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

Give this honey mascarpone tart a try and let me know what you think! Happy Thursday!

If you like this honey mascarpone tart, be sure to check out:

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A simple, fast recipe that takes less than 30 minutes. A quick brown sugar butter and pretzel pie crust filled with a no bake cream cheese cheesecake type filling and topped with fresh strawberries or berries of your choice. Recipe adapted from Bake from Scratch Magazine. Perfect make ahead dessert idea. Thewoodandspoon.com

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are simple, individual mini tarts made in removable bottom tart pans. An easy cheesecake and canned pumpkin puree filling swirled together with sugar and fall spices like cinnamon. The press in crust is easy to make and the whole thing is topped with sweet and salty walnuts or pecans or other nuts. Find this great dinner party dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

 

Bruleed Key Lime Pies 

Bruleed Key Lime Pies Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Simple key lime pie tarts made in mini tart pans with removable bottoms. Graham cracker and butter crust with a sweetened condensed milk and key lime juice and zest and sugar filling. These bake up really fast! You can substitute regular lime juice. Sprinkle the top with sugar for a crunchy brûlée topping. Serve with whipped cream. Make these ahead of time and torch when ready to eat! Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

Blueberry Galette with a Cornmeal Crust

Blueberry Galette with a Cornmeal Crust Dessert Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a simple, fast and easy recipe. Ripe, summer produce like blueberries and lemon are thick and juicy in this pie filling. The crust has cornmeal, flour, butter, and shortening, so it is flaky, golden and perfect every time pie crust. Serve on your summer holidays for a casual and rustic dessert. Serve with ice cream or whipped cream. You can substitute other fruit too like strawberries, peaches, or stone fruit in this galette. Find the recipe and more summer recipe inspiration at thewoodandspoon.com .

Print

Honey Mascarpone Tart

Honey Mascarpone Tart By The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, summer dessert. A no-bake cheesecake tart of sorts with a salty press in graham cracker and a creamy cheese filling. The tart is naturally sweetened with honey and is topped with toasted pistachios and fresh figs. This dessert can be made ahead and is quick- it takes less than 30 minutes of prep time. Make this little tartlet in place of summer pies. Find the whole recipe and photos on thewoodandspoon.com

This honey mascarpone tart is a quick and simple mascarpone cream dessert with a salty graham cracker crust. The tart is finished with fresh figs and toasted pistachios.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 240
  • Total Time: 4 hours 30 minutes
Scale

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 1/3 cup (70 gm) brown sugar, packed
  • 2 cups (200 gm) graham cracker crumbs
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 7 tablespoons (100 gm) unsalted butter, melted

For the filling:

  • 8 ounces (230 gm) mascarpone cheese
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 1 cup plus 1/3 cup (320 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • 12 cups of fresh figs, halved (peaches, berries, or cherries can be substituted)
  • ¼ cup (40 gm) chopped pistachios, toasted (optional)
  • Additional honey for drizzling (optional)

Instructions

To prepare the crust:

  1. Whisk together the brown sugar, graham cracker crumbs, and salt in a medium sized bowl. Add the melted butter and stir until well combined. Press the crumbs into the bottom and sides of a 9-10” tart pan with a removable bottom. Place in the fridge to chill while you prepare the filling.

To prepare the filling:

  1. In a large bowl, beat the mascarpone cheese on medium speed until creamed and no lumps remain, about 1 minute. Be sure the cheese has come to room temperature or you will have a clumpy filling. Add the brown sugar and beat to combine, about 30 seconds. Add in the honey slowly with the mixer on low. Scrape the sides of the bowl and beat for an additional 30 seconds to ensure everything is well combined.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat 1 cup of the heavy cream on medium low speed until it gets frothy. Increase the speed and beat until stiff peaks form. Do not overbeat.
  3. Fold about half of the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture. Add the remaining half and fold to combine. If you notice your filling is a bit clumpy, add in the additional 1/3 cup of cream and beat briefly to smooth out.
  4. Spread the filling into the prepared tart crust and allow to chill in the fridge for several hours to firm up. Once ready to serve, garnish the tart or each slice with figs, pistachios, and an extra drizzle of honey, if desired. Store in the fridge up to 3 days.

Notes

  • In a pinch, you can use cream cheese in place of mascarpone, but I highly encourage the mascarpone! It works perfectly with the honey.
  • If your mascarpone curdles a bit when you add the honey, try refrigerating it and then re-mixing. I have found this helps to minimize the curdles. Most of the lumps disappear with the addition of the whipped cream anyways.

Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Guys, if you thought you liked eating regular tiramisu, just wait until you see what happens when you stack it like a birthday cake. Straight up MAGICAL. Making this tiramisu cake is one of the better choices I’ve made recently. Unlike some things in life, this cake is a no-brainer. 

Someone recently asked me if Brett and I planned to have any more children. At the time, I think I was bouncing a fussy George on one hip while Aimee cried loudly from time out in the next room over. I diffused that question with a laugh and gestured towards the two crying babies as if to say, “Ha! Not any time soon.”

One of my (many) prerequisites for having more children is that someone has to be potty trained. Someone needs to be able to manage their own bathroom situation without mom having to get involved. I can’t simultaneously change the diaper of one child and wipe the bottom of another while a newborn is latched on to my boob. Moms may have superpowers but I’ve only got two hands, okay?

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Brett and I have spent the last few months casually trying to potty train Aimee, and while there have been some major improvements, we’re just not quite there yet. In fact, I’m convinced Aimee is pretty much using the toilet to scratch her itch for candy. “Mama, if Aimee goes peepee on the potty, I get candy?” “Mama, Aimee sat on the potty at school today- you give me candy?” “Mama, come look in the potty! There’s peepee! Aimee get candy!” You can’t blame the girl. IT’S CANDY. It’s practically a form of currency for toddlers. (Sidenote: Please watch this bit of Jerry Seinfeld standup where he talks about kids and candy. HILARIOUS.)

So I’ve basically resorted to whoring out our candy drawer for any degree of bathroom activity, because I am desperate to get out of this phase of life where I have to change two sets of diapers. Unfortunately, no amount of candy can stand up against the wants of a stubborn child. Aimee, my strong-willed beauty, who even at 2 years old already has unique certainty of who she is and what she wants, has decided she does not want to be entirely potty trained. She is perfectly content to wear a pull-up 24/7, and no amount of begging, bribing, encouragement or discipline will change that until she is ready. So what’s a girl to do? Let the kid eat, breathe, sleep in the bathroom just in case she decides to go? That sounds sanitary. Maybe keep changing the diapers? That sounds tiresome. Maybe I’ll just pour a cocktail and let dad do the work. Wait, that actually sounds brilliant…Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog // thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!I’ve only been doing this for a couple of years, so I don’t have all of the mom stuff figured out yet. What I do know is cake. So let’s talk about that instead. 

This tiramisu cake is decadent. A take on the old Italian classic, this cake is three layers of creamy, coffee, moist cakey goodnesss and is a stunning way to transform an otherwise plain looking dessert. We start by baking the cake layers. I use a simple vanilla cake recipe adapted from the brilliant Rose Levy Beranbaum. She makes most things perfect, so you can trust this recipe. The cake layers are moist yet dense and stable enough to handle the soak and cream filling this cake sports.

Once the layers are baked, cooled, and ready for stacking, we make the mascarpone cream frosting by beating together the cheese, sugar, cream, and Kahlua. Next, we soak the cakes in some coffee and liquor mainly because that’s what you do with tiramisu but also because booze and caffeine are the lifeblood of any decent parent, AMIRITE!?! I chose to assemble this tiramisu cake in the same way that I stack my naked cakes in order to keep the layers tidy and pretty, but if you’re desperate to just face-plant into the cake and don’t care what it looks like you can totally bypass this step. Once assembled, the cake take a long nap in the fridge before it’s ready to be served and enjoyed.

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! The Wood and Spoon Blog.

Even though I’m a sucker for cake in general, somehow this tiramisu cake gets to me. The texture, the flavors, the way it reminds me of the many slices of tiramisu that I’ve had before- everything just screams “YES!” to me. This tiramisu cake gets better over time, so it’s a great dessert to make ahead, store in the fridge, and serve a day or two later. The coffee soak and mascarpone whipped cream filling keep the cake moist, so you can continue to enjoy it 3, 4, maybe even 5 days after preparing it. No guarantees it will go that long uneaten though. If you’re in a rush and don’t want to fuss with a homemade cake, of course you can substitute a box cake mix, but keep in mind that there will be enough mascarpone filling for 3 layers of cake, so you’ll need more than a single box of cake mix. Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! Naked Cake by The Wood and Spoon Blog

You guys know me. I make no qualms about having my ducks in a row or always knowing what to do when it comes to stuff like being a mom, wife, or official potty trainer. But this tiramisu cake? You can bank on it. If you’re a coffee lover, a cake lover, or a booze lover, this tiramisu cake is bound to make all of your dreams come true. Scouts honor.

Give the recipe a try let me know what you think! I think it’d be perfect for your next dinner party, birthday, or casual “It’s Wednesday and I love myself” gathering. If you need me, I’ll be over here in the land of Skittles and mini toddler-sized toilets, s if you have any words of wisdom on managing the bowels of tiny humans, I’ll gladly listen. Happy Tuesday and cheers to you!

 

You may also like:

Espresso Caramel Thumbprint Cookies

Peppermint Bark Ice Cream Cake

Hazelnut Mocha Cream Pie

 

Print

Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

This tiramisu cake is three layers of vanilla cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and frosted with a creamy mascarpone whipped cream.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: 10 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake layers

  • 4 cups (400 gm) cake flour
  • 2 cups sugar (400 gm)
  • 2 tablespoons (30 gm) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks, 230 gm) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) buttermilk, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla

For the soak

  • 3/4 cup (180 mL) strong brewed coffee (warm or cold, doesn’t matter)
  • 1/4 cup (60 mL) Kahlua or coffee liquor
  • 12 teaspoons espresso powder (optional)

For the mascarpone whipped cream

  • 16 ounces (460 gm) mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • 8 ounces (230 gm) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (170 gm) powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Kahlua
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ cup (30 gm) cocoa powder

Instructions

To prepare the cake layers

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease three 8” round pans. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of each one for easy removal, if desired.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients until well dispersed, about 30 seconds. Add the softened butter and ¾ of the buttermilk to the dry ingredients. Keep the mixer on low until slightly combined and then increase to medium speed and beat for 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the rest of the buttermilk and one egg and beat on low for 30 seconds to incorporate. Add the additional egg and the vanilla and beat for another 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated batter.
  3. Spread the batter evenly among the three pans and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes. A toothpick inserted should come out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove from pan and remain cooling on a rack until room temperature. If you don’t plan to use the cakes immediately, wrap tightly in plastic wrap.

To prepare the soak

  1. Combine the coffee and coffee liquor in a small bowl. Taste the mixture. If it doesn’t have a strong coffee flavor, you can sprinkle in some of the espresso powder for an extra punch of coffee. If you would prefer a more mild coffee flavor, this is not necessary.

To prepare the mascarpone whipped cream

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a medium sized bowl, beat together the mascarpone cheese and cream cheese until combined and smooth, about 1-2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the powdered sugar and Kahlua and beat briefly to combine. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream until stiff peaks form. To do this, start the mixer on low and beat until the cream gets frothy. Increase the speed to high and beat until the whipping cream has barely thickened enough to stand up in straight peaks on its own. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture until smooth.

To assemble the cake

  1. Level all three cake layers using a serrated knife. (Note: I find it easiest to level cakes when they are still partially frozen.) Use a basting or pastry brush to “‘soak” each cake layer with the soak. Continue adding the coffee liquid to the cakes until they are well moistened, but not to where the coffee has dredged all the way through and has made the cake fall apart. You may not use all of the soak.
  2. On top of one soaked cake layer, spread about 1-1/4-1-1/2 cups of the mascarpone whipped cream and smooth out the top. Add an additional cake layer on top and repeat this process. Add the final cake layer to the top of the cake and spread a generous amount of whipped cream on top. Continue frosting the sides as well.
  3. You can allow the cake to chill and firm up in the fridge for a few hours if desired, or you can serve it immediately. I prefer to allow the cake to sit in the fridge so that the cake layers can continue to soften and soak up the coffee and the cream.
  4. Prior to serving, use a sifter to sprinkle some cocoa powder on top of the cake.

Notes

  • Notes: To prepare the cake as I did, as a naked cake, see the link in the post, or find the confetti ice cream cake in my blog archives. There are directions there for how to assemble a naked cake.
  • If you have another favorite recipe for a vanilla or white cake, feel free to substitute here.
  • If you choose not to prepare the cake in a “naked’ fashion, consider chilling the whipped cream in the fridge briefly so that it can firm up a bit. This will help keep the cream from just squishing out the sides when you stack your cakes.

Cake Recipe Adapted from: The Cake Bible