tiramisu

Raspberry Tiramisu

Raspberry Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for a raspberry jam and whipped mascarpone tiramisu using ladyfingers and no eggs. This summery recipe comes together easily and feeds a crowd. Learn how simple the recipe is at thewoodandspoon.com

I’ve started dreaming of traveling abroad again. This past decade has found me staying close to home, because apparently you can’t just leave children and small businesses unattended for long periods of time? But recently, as my kids have gotten a smidge older, I’ve started to wonder if we might be ready for a bigger adventure, the kind that calls for foreign languages and a short hop across the pond. At one point in time in my life, I was sure that I was destined for a life dotted with passport stamps and foods I couldn’t pronounce the name of, and now, 9 years into an entirely different (but even more-so wonderful) kind of life, I’m realizing that I kind of forgot about some of those dreams. This raspberry tiramisu is a small glimpse of me dusting that part of myself off.

Raspberry Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for a raspberry jam and whipped mascarpone tiramisu using ladyfingers and no eggs. This summery recipe comes together easily and feeds a crowd. Learn how simple the recipe is at thewoodandspoon.com

A few months back, I found a bucket list I wrote back in college. I was pretty tickled to realize I have gotten to experience many of the things I wrote on that original list, but one of the items that I hadn’t even gotten close to was listed second thing on that list: “Learn French.” Over the past couple of months, I have kept coming back to that bullet item, feeling silly for wanting to pursue something so frivolous. Let’s face it: I live in Small Town, AL. Not many people around here speak French, you know? But I couldn’t shake it. I still wanted some of those things that 20-year old me wanted, and I didn’t know why I was shelving something that, at one point, was worthy of a #2 spot.

“What would life be if we had no courage to attempt anything?” – Vincent van Gogh.

Raspberry Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for a raspberry jam and whipped mascarpone tiramisu using ladyfingers and no eggs. This summery recipe comes together easily and feeds a crowd. Learn how simple the recipe is at thewoodandspoon.com

So I downloaded Pimsleur French, bought a few books, and for the past month or so, I’ve been fumbling through simple phrases and the pronunciation of those throaty French R’s. I wouldn’t say I’m spectacular at it, but it has scratched an itch for creativity and exploring that has felt really untouchable lately. And with learning a new language, I’ve started tossing around other ideas, too, namely, traveling abroad. So that brings me to this raspberry tiramisu.

Raspberry Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for a raspberry jam and whipped mascarpone tiramisu using ladyfingers and no eggs. This summery recipe comes together easily and feeds a crowd. Learn how simple the recipe is at thewoodandspoon.com
Raspberry Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for a raspberry jam and whipped mascarpone tiramisu using ladyfingers and no eggs. This summery recipe comes together easily and feeds a crowd. Learn how simple the recipe is at thewoodandspoon.com

Raspberry Tiramisu

While I was googling things like “idyllic AirBnB in Provence” and “traveling to Paris with kids,” a friend tossed out the idea for an Italian trip. Within days, my heart tumbled down a rabbit hole of Roman ruins and espresso-soaked desserts, and that, plus a fridge full of summer berries led me to this raspberry tiramisu. Classic tiramisu is one of my all-time favorite desserts, and the chocolate tiramisu I shared on this site some time ago remains a fan favorite here too. This raspberry tiramisu is a light, more summery version of the classic featuring the flavors of tart berries and zested lemon. The mascarpone whipped cream is the star of the show, and I cannot get over how well it mingles with the fruit. Truly, it’s a cloud-like dream of a dessert!

Be sure to read through all of the instructions before you attempt this dessert. While incredibly simple, there are a few steps, so take your time and enjoy every bite. And in the meantime, if you find yourself ready to dust off some old ideas, dreams, or goals, I hope you’ll take this as your green light to move ahead. I’m only a few days into my weird, totally unnecessary pursuit, but so far, I’m loving it. Happy Monday to you guys, and Happy Baking!

If you like this raspberry tiramisu, you should check out:

Classic Tiramisu
Chocolate Tiramisu
White Chocolate Raspberry Tarts
Raspberry Champagne Pop-Tarts

Raspberry Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for a raspberry jam and whipped mascarpone tiramisu using ladyfingers and no eggs. This summery recipe comes together easily and feeds a crowd. Learn how simple the recipe is at thewoodandspoon.com
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Raspberry Tiramisu

This raspberry tiramisu is a summery take on classic tiramisu, made with a whipped mascarpone cheese and berry-soaked ladyfingers.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Total Time: 30
  • Yield: 8 Servings
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • ½ cup sugar, divided
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 cups raspberries
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese, at room temperature
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • ¾ cup raspberry preserves
  • 20 or so ladyfinger cookies, soft or hard are fine
  • Confectioner’s sugar and raspberries, for decorating

Instructions

  1. Line an 8×4” loaf pan with plastic wrap in two directions with the wrap extending over the sides on all directions. Set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine ¼ cup sugar with the water and 2 cups of raspberries. Stirring regularly, allow the sugar to dissolve completely and then remove immediately from heat. Gently press down on the raspberries to release some of the juices. Stir in the lemon zest and set aside.
  3. In a medium-sized bowl with a hand mixer, beat the mascarpone gently just to smooth out. Slowly stream in the whipping cream and the remaining ¼ cup of sugar and continue to beat on medium speed until thickened to a fluffy consistency. Set aside.
  4. Strain the raspberries from the syrupy mixture, reserving both the berries and the syrup. Stir 2 tablespoons of the syrupy liquid into the preserves and then stir in the berries as well. Now that you have the mascarpone whipped cream, the berry preserve mixture, and the raspberry syrup, it’s time to begin assembling!
  5. Quickly dunk a ladyfinger into the syrup, saturating both sides before placing into the bottom of the pan. You can layer these in however you’d like, but you see check out the photo in the post above for a reference of how I assembled. I found two rows of ladyfingers, the second of which was slightly broken off to fit in the bottom of the pan, worked best. Once you have a single layer of soaked ladyfingers in the bottom of your pan, spoon a heaping cup-ful of the whipped cream on top. Spread to smooth. Spread half of the berry preserve mixture on top of the whipped cream and repeat this process again: soaked ladyfingers, whipped cream, and then berry preserves. Finish off your tiramisu layers with a final layer of ladyfingers and whatever whipped cream is leftover. Smooth to finish and then cover with plastic wrap to rest in the fridge for about 6 hours or overnight.
    To serve, invert the tiramisu onto a plate and remove the plastic wrap. Garnish with raspberries and a dusting of confectioner’s sugar, if desired.

Did you make this recipe?

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Chocolate Tiramisu (and announcing MY FIRST BOOK!)

Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com

Grab a fork and settle in, because we are CELEBRATING all sorts of things with a little chocolate tiramisu today.

First off, it’s my FIVE YEAR BLOG ANNIVERSARY. Yep, five years. It blows my mind in every possible way that this site has existed for that long. Together, we’ve made ____ recipes, welcomed two new babies, built a house, had a couple website refreshers, and shared wayyyy too much personal information. If you’ve stuck around with me since the beginning (Hi, Mom), thank you. Your support and emails and kindness have meant the world to me. To have a job that feels more like a hobby is such a blessing, and I couldn’t be more grateful. Although a lot has changed since day one of this site, my love of food and writing remains the same, and I’m thrilled to keep on keeping on here. Which brings me to celebratory item number two:

Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com

Drumroll, please…

I WROTE A BOOK. A real life book (!!!!) It’s been a long road, so I wanted to share a little about the process.

I started this blog in 2016 in hopes of becoming a cookbook author. At the time, I was following other bloggers who had been around a while and were finally landing cookbook deals of their own. I wanted in! So after lots of nervous back-and-forth with my husband, friends, and mother (Hi again, Mom!), I decided to dive in and start this site with the end-goal of writing a book.

Less than two years later, I had established a relationship with a publishing company and was writing a cookbook proposal with one of their senior editors. This was it! My dreams were coming true! We worked hard for months, but the day before my proposal was to be approved for contract, the publishing company was bought out by a giant media company. Immediately, all projects not under contract were suspended, and after another 6 months of back and forth, they were completely dissolved. I was crushed. It had been over a year of time and work and vulnerability with that company, and I was so disappointed to start over.

Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com

My editor for the project was incredibly kind, and at her last day on the job, she connected me with a book agent out of New York. After some conversation and brainstorming, we began working together to iron out the existing proposal. We got a few nibbles from a couple of publishing companies, but ultimately, the project fell flat. By now, it’s January of 2020. It had been two years of proposal writing with no signs of success on the horizon, and here we were, back at square one.

Thank goodness we didn’t give up.

Over the next couple of months, I wrote a new cookbook proposal from scratch, and the day after I submitted it to my agent, I began writing a second proposal. This one was different: a 365-day devotional for women. The Word document on my computer basically filled itself with 56 pages of stories and scripture and thoughts and questions, and less than a month later, it was ready to submit to my agent. We decided to move forward with the devotional, and within no time, I was negotiating offers from multiple publishers. Ultimately, my little project found a home at HarperOne, an imprint of Harper Collins, and in July, I dove head first into writing my very first book. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be sharing more about the project, but for now, I’ll end with this:

Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com

Don’t give up.
Take a chance on your ambitions.
Work hard.
Ignore the pessimists and self-doubt that tell you you’ll never reach the desires in your heart, and if there’s something in there worth going after, do it. When I take inventory of the most beautiful and life-giving things in my story, I’m reminded that absolutely none of it happened overnight, and so much of the deferred hope, perseverance, and effort that I experienced allows me to treasure those gifts for what they are. A closed door or setback in your story doesn’t mean the end of your story, and I really believe that when we push through the barriers and unbelief, we often find breakthrough and joy on the other side.

Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com
Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com

Chocolate Tiramisu

I’ve never actually had chocolate tiramisu until I prepared this particular recipe. Truly, I’m wondering why it’s not made more frequently. I mean, we all love classic tiramisu, right? This is no different, just a little extra chocolate. Here, a chocolate ganache, mascarpone, and whipped cream come together to make an espresso-scented treat that is altogether rich and creamy and comforting. The tall slices make for an elegant dessert that requires very little time and effort. If you’re looking for a simple yet impressive make-ahead dessert, I hope you’ll take a chance on this chocolate tiramisu. Truly, it’s delightful.

There’s another delicious recipe and more on the book coming next week. In the meantime, if you get an opportunity to make this chocolate tiramisu, tell me about it! Happy Saturday to you and HAPPY BAKING!

Chocolate Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a small batch tiramisu recipe made in a loaf pan, switched up with the addition of a chocolate ganache. Mascarpone cheese keeps this dessert true to the Italian classic and crisp ladyfingers soak in kahlua and coffee. Learn how to prepare make-ahead tiramisu on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this chocolate tiramisu, you should try:

Classic Tiramisu
Tiramisu Cream Puffs
Tiramisu Cake
Kentucky Coffee
Toffee Espresso Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Chocolate Tiramisu

This chocolate tiramisu is a small-batch recipe made in a loaf pan and flavored with the addition of chocolate ganache.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Total Time: 360
  • Yield: 6 Servings
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (85 gm) semisweet chocolate, chips or chopped
  • ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream, divided 
  • 1 cup (240 gm) warm espresso or strong-brewed coffee
  • 2 tablespoons Kahlua or rum/coffee liquor
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) granulated sugar
  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1820 ladyfinger cookies (hard or soft is fine)

Instructions

  1. Prepare an 8”x4” loaf pan by lining it both ways with plastic wrap, extending the plastic beyond the sides. Set aside. 
  2. In a small saucepan over low heat, gently heat the chocolate chips and 2 tablespoons of whipping cream, stirring constantly, until melted and smooth. Do not overheat. Once chips are completely melted, remove from heat to a bowl and set in the fridge while you prepare the rest of the elements. 
  3. Combine the espresso and kahlua in a small bowl. Set aside.
  4. In a medium bowl, beat the egg yolks and sugar together until thickened and pale, about 2-3 minutes. When a beater or spatula dipped into the mixture is removed it should gradually pour off in a thin, viscous ribbon. Add the mascarpone and beat on low till combined. Stir in the slightly cooled chocolate and cream mixture. Set aside. 
  5. In a separate bowl, beat the remaining heavy whipping cream and vanilla on medium speed to stiff peaks. Fold the whipped cream into the egg yolk mixture until smooth and fluffy, being careful not to overwork. Set it aside.
  6. When you’re ready to assemble the tiramisu, dust the bottom of your prepared pan with a thin layer of cocoa powder. Working quickly and carefully, dip both sides of your lady fingers into the coffee/kahlua mixture and arrange them in a single layer in the bottom of your dusted dish. You want to fill in any larger holes but don’t worry about breaking up your ladyfingers to squeeze them into tiny holes. Spread 1/3 of the cream mixture on top of the lady fingers and dust the cream with another layer of cocoa powder. Repeat your process twice with another layer of ladyfingers, cream, and cocoa powder for a total of three layers. Allow to set up in the fridge for 6 hours for cool removal from the pan. Alternatively, you can prepare this up to a day or two in advance, keeping covered and stored in the fridge. When ready to serve, invert the pan onto a serving platter and peel back the plastic wrap. Dust with additional cocoa powder or grated chocolate if desired and serve slices. 

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Classic Tiramisu

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Friday, Y’all! I’m writing to you on what is actually Sunday because my fam jam and I are traveling to the most magical place on earth this weekend: Disney World. Yes, I fall into the small category of native Floridians who actually *love* Disney, and it is my biggest joy as a Mom to get to share that experience with my own kids. In lieu of a long, drawn-out post, I have a banging recipe and few favorite things to share with you this morning. Stay tuned for the classic tiramisu recipe and settle in for a some links to my late-winter faves!

A Favorite Read:

I love this article from Bon Appetit. As a food blogger, I get tons of questions about substitutions. Can I sub oil for butter here? Would brown sugar work in place of granulated? What if I don’t have baking soda?! Sometimes there are some simple substitutions that can be easily made, but often you just gotta stick with the recipe. This article from Bon Appetit speaks to those substitutions and why, if in doubt, you just need to follow the recipe. Enjoy the read!

A Favorite Beauty Find:

Anyone else feeling straight-up pasty this time of year? By the time February rolls around, I have been absent from the sun for, like, ever. I am in desperate need of a freshening up. I don’t love to wear a ton of makeup, so this CC Cream (that means Color Correcting Cream!) is a perfect option for me. It’s a tinted moisturizer with SPF 35 and foundation properties that keep skin looking smooth and flawless. I wear just a few dabs of it under my blush and it has completely taken care of any postpartum redness and dark eye circles that I had before. Bonus: this is a clean(er) skincare line, so you can feel good about using it. Find the shade that works for you and give it a try!

A Favorite Thing to Wear:

Mom confession: I live in athletic clothes. If I happen upon a day that I actually have to wear a pair of pants that buttons, it’s truly hard times. Enter these fun rainbow sneakers. They’re the happiest little shoe I’ve ever worn and they totally help ease the transition from workout clothes to comfy casual. If I’m not wearing my Nikes or slippers, it’s these little guys 100%. This is one of my favorite shoes brands, so I hope you find something you love too!

A Favorite New Cookbook:

A sweet friend I’ve followed on social media for ages has just released a cookbook that is awe-inspiring and stunning. Julie Jones is a trained chef across the pond. She’s known for her intricate pies, tarts, and other baked goods. From following her, I know she is also a lovely human with a big heart. Her book reflects all of those qualities, and I am happy to add it to my collection. Check out the publication here!

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

A Favorite Classic Tiramisu:

Classic tiramisu is a recipe I never tire of. The creamy texture and hints of cocoa and espresso throughout play together to create a comforting, almost seductive recipe that is unlike any other. When I am craving a classic tiramisu, there is simply nothing else that will satisfy. It’s unique and 100% its own.

What I love more than anything about this Italian dessert is the ease with which it comes together and the fact that it is a make-ahead option fit for a crowd. This recipe is sufficient to serve up to 10 and you can prepare and store it in your fridge up to two days in advance. Does that make this classic tiramisu the perfect option for these end-of-winter dinner parties and candlelit gatherings? Yep. I recently made a couple of dishes of it for a Valentine’s Day gathering I had with friends and received rave reviews. (Disclaimer: my friends are not above stroking my ego, so if they lied and this dessert actually sucks you can blame them, okay?)

For a small portion, feel free to halve this recipe. You can also prepare this is several individual dishes, just be sure to use smaller pieces of the ladyfingers to fit in whatever container you opt for. I love the idea of making this in tiny glass trifle dishes so that you can see the little layers before you dive in! Plus, everyone loves an individual dessert just for themselves. It definitely ups the fancy factor.

Give this classic tiramisu a try this weekend and let me know what you think! In the meantime, follow along on my Instagram to see BTS footage of the kids at Disney this weekend. If our last trip was any indication, this one is sure to be a hoot. Happy Friday and have a great weekend!

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this classic tiramisu you should try:

Cookie Butter Mousse
Tiramisu Cream Puffs
Tiramisu Cake
Caramelized Banana Pudding
Chocolate Budino

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Classic Tiramisu

This classic tiramisu features Kahlua and coffee soaked ladyfingers, a whipped mascarpone filling, and loads of chocolate flavor. 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Total Time: 60
  • Yield: 9 Servings
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 1 cup warm espresso or strong-brewed coffee
  • 2 tablespoons Kahlua or rum/coffee liquor
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 16 ounces mascarpone cheese
  • 11/2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • 24+ ladyfingers (I used about 28 in my dish but will differ depending on what size you choose. Hard or soft Cookies is just fine !)

Instructions

  1. Combine the espresso and kahlua in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks and sugar together until thickened and pale, about 4 minutes. When a beater or spatula dipped into the mixture is removed it should gradually pour off in a thin, viscous ribbon. Add the mascarpone and beat on low till combined. Set aside. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream and vanilla on medium speed to stiff peaks. Fold the whipped cream into the egg yolk mixture until smooth and fluffy, being careful not to overwork. Set it aside.
  3. When you’re ready to assemble the tiramisu, dust the bottom of your serving dish with a layer of cocoa powder, about 1-1/2 teaspoons. Working quickly and carefully, dip your lady fingers into the coffee kahlua mixture and arrange them in a single layer in the bottom of your dusted dish. You want to fill in any larger holes but don’t worry about breaking up your ladyfingers to squeeze them into tiny holes. Spread half of the cream mixture on top of the lady fingers and dust the cream with another layer of cocoa powder. Repeat your process with another layer of ladyfingers, cream, and cocoa powder. Allow to set up in the fridge for at least an hour before serving. Alternatively, you can prepare this up to a day or two in advance, keeping covered and stored in the fridge.

Notes

  1. If you don’t have espresso, you can brew EXTRA STRONG coffee or stir some espresso powder into your warm coffee.
  2. Soft ladyfingers will be quick to fall apart in the coffee mixture, so work quickly! If you’re into a strong coffee flavor, you can also brush the tops of the ladyfingers with the coffee mixture after they’re been placed in the pan. 
  3. Using raw eggs totally freaks people out- I get it. Opt for fresh farm eggs or pasteurized to be on the safe side.

Did you make this recipe?

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Tiramisu Cream Puffs

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

As a mother of two toddlers, I spend a lot of time playing make believe. Whether we’re eating crumpets at a tea party, hunting down an imaginary bear, or calling Mickey Mouse on the telephone, this kind of play is a fun way to connect the real with the imaginary. Currently, princesses reign supreme in our house, and it’s not unusual for at least two or three of us to be clicking around in plastic high heels, fluffy skirts, and play jewelry. The biggest compliment you can give my daughter is to tell her she looks like a princess, because to her, it’s the highest honor.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

On Being Fancy.

Here’s the thing: from a young age, kids know and love the concept of royalty. There’s something special and fanciful about dressing up and being an elite version of yourself. Even as adults, we love real-life royal weddings, romances, feuds, and even deaths because those humans and the lives they lead feel distinguished and extraordinary, a little like a lifetime of playing dress-up. There’s not a single woman reading this who, at one point, didn’t dream of a life like this of our own. We’re engrained to delight in the fancy things.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So why not? Even as adults, we can still play pretend! We can invite our girlfriends over, open our nicest bottle of wine, and fancy. We can ignore our sometimes dull surroundings, clothing, and lifestyles, and dream up a champagne and caviar world. Yes, we love and honor the beauty of our realities, but we can gussy-up what we’ve got and put our pinkies out for a day. In fact, I think we should do it.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs

So cue the tiramisu cream puffs.

Even if you’ve grown up eating tiny fancy-pants treats like cream puffs, I can almost bet you’ve never had ones made with a tiramisu filling. While even an experienced home baker may be intimidated by attempting something like this in their own kitchen, I can promise you that these treats are attainable; you’re going to be so proud of yourself when you make these little showstoppers. Scout’s honor.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

Making the Cream Puffs

To make your own tiramisu cream puffs, we start with the pastry. Here, the pastry we’re making is called choux. We make this classic French staple by cooking butter, water and flour into a thick pasty dough and beating in a few eggs. In the oven, they bake into light and airy rounds with a flavor similar to a popover. It’s hollow center is perfect for piping in yumminess like the mascarpone filling we use for these tiramisu cream puffs.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

Filling the Puffs

To prepare the filling, we beat some mascarpone cheese with Kahlua, or another coffee-flavored liquor. Fold that into a homemade whipped cream which fluffs up our choux filling. For the topping, we make a simple ganache to drizzle over or dip our cream puffs into. Once completed, these tiramisu cream puffs are fancy finger treats fit for a princess- shockingly simple for such a special outcome.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

The truth is, we all have a little fancy in us. It looks different from person to person, but it’s 100% okay to play the part every once in a while. I hope you’ll delight yourself in the fancy sometime this summer, and maybe, if you do, you’ll make these tiramisu cream puffs for the occasion. Happy Wednesday, friends, and happy baking!

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you like these tiramisu cream puffs you should try:

Tiramisu Cake

Coffee Donuts

Coffee Almond Scones

Homemade Chocolates

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Tiramisu Cream Puffs

These tiramisu cream  puffs are bite-sized profiteroles filled with a mascarpone and coffee whipped cream. Each puff is topped with thick dark chocolate ganache. Perfect option for a fancy finger food! 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 35
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 15

Ingredients

For the choux (adapted from Rose Levy Beranbaum):

  • ½ cup (120 gm) water
  • 4 tablespoons (55 gm) unsalted butter
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ cup (70 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs

For the tiramisu cream:

  • 4 ounces mascarpone cheese, at cool room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons coffee liquor (I use Kahlua)
  • 1 cup (240 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • ¾ cup (90 gm) powdered sugar

For the ganache:

  • 1/3 cup (80 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • 4 ounces chopped dark chocolate

Instructions

For the choux:

  • Preheat the oven to 425 degrees and line a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper. Fit a piping bag with a large round tip (I use Ateco 809) or snip the end off of a quart-sized freezer plastic bag.
  • In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the water, butter, sugar and salt until the butter has melted and the mixture is boiling. Remove the saucepan from the heat and add all of the flour, stirring vigorously to combine. After a few moments of stirring, the dough will form a moist ball that pulls away from the sides of the pan. Return the pan back to the heat to cook, paddling the dough with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula for 3 minutes. Dump the dough into a large bowl and add the eggs one at a time, stirring vigorously after each addition to combine.  The dough should be viscous enough to hold a soft peak when you pull the wooden spoon out of it. If it is too stiff, add a teaspoon or two of water. Scoop the mixture into the piping bag and squeeze out tablespoon-sized round balls (see photo) of dough, about 2 inches apart on the prepared pan. Barely moisten a fingertip to smooth out any peaks on the rounds so that they are rounded disks, similar to the shape of a baked macaron cookie. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes, then decrease the oven temp to 350 and bake an additional 15-20 minutes, or until the puffs are golden brown. Allow to cool prior to using.

For the tiramisu cream:

  1. Beat the mascarpone and coffee liquor with a hand mixer on medium speed for about 30 seconds or until smooth. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, whip the heavy whipping cream on medium speed until slightly thickened. Add the powdered sugar and continue whipping until stiff peaks form. Use a rubber spatula to gently fold the mascarpone mixture into the whipped cream. Set aside in the fridge until the cream puffs have cooled to room temperature. When ready to fill, slice a tiny slit onto the top of each cream puff. Spoon the tiramisu cream into a piping bag fitted with a round tip and fill each puff with cream until full. Set aside while you make the ganache.

For the ganache:

  1. Heat the heavy whipping cream in the microwave or on the stove until steaming. Pour the hot cream over top of the chopped chocolate in a small bowl and cover the whole thing with a sheet of plastic wrap. After 5 minutes, stir the mixture until smooth and pour a spoonful of ganache on top of each puff. Alternatively, you can dip the cream puffs. The ganache will firm up as it sets, so be sure the gently reheat as needed.

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Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Guys, if you thought you liked eating regular tiramisu, just wait until you see what happens when you stack it like a birthday cake. Straight up MAGICAL. Making this tiramisu cake is one of the better choices I’ve made recently. Unlike some things in life, this cake is a no-brainer.

Someone recently asked me if Brett and I planned to have any more children. At the time, I think I was bouncing a fussy George on one hip while Aimee cried loudly from time out in the next room over. I diffused that question with a laugh and gestured towards the two crying babies as if to say, “Ha! Not any time soon.”

Potty Training

One of my (many) prerequisites for having more children is that someone has to be potty trained. Someone needs to be able to manage their own bathroom situation without mom having to get involved. I can’t simultaneously change the diaper of one child and wipe the bottom of another while a newborn is latched on to my boob. Moms may have superpowers but I’ve only got two hands, okay?

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Candy Bribery

Brett and I have spent the last few months casually trying to potty train Aimee, and while there have been some major improvements, we’re just not quite there yet. In fact, I’m convinced Aimee is pretty much using the toilet to scratch her itch for candy. “Mama, if Aimee goes peepee on the potty, I get candy?” “Mama, Aimee sat on the potty at school today- you give me candy?” “Mama, come look in the potty! There’s peepee! Aimee get candy!” You can’t blame the girl. IT’S CANDY. It’s practically a form of currency for toddlers. (Sidenote: Please watch this bit of Jerry Seinfeld standup where he talks about kids and candy. HILARIOUS.)

So I’ve basically resorted to whoring out our candy drawer for any degree of bathroom activity, because I am desperate to get out of this phase of life where I have to change two sets of diapers. Unfortunately, no amount of candy can stand up against the wants of a stubborn child. Aimee, my strong-willed beauty, who even at 2 years old already has unique certainty of who she is and what she wants, has decided she does not want to be entirely potty trained. She is perfectly content to wear a pull-up 24/7, and no amount of begging, bribing, encouragement or discipline will change that until she is ready.

So what’s a girl to do? Let the kid eat, breathe, sleep in the bathroom just in case she decides to go? That sounds sanitary. Maybe keep changing the diapers? That sounds tiresome. Maybe I’ll just pour a cocktail and let dad do the work. Wait, that actually sounds brilliant…Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog // thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Tiramisu Cake

I’ve only been doing this for a couple of years, so I don’t have all of the mom stuff figured out yet. What I do know is cake. So let’s talk about that instead.

The Layers

This tiramisu cake is decadent. A take on the old Italian classic, this cake is three layers of creamy, coffee, moist cakey goodnesss and is a stunning way to transform an otherwise plain looking dessert. We start by baking the cake layers. I use a simple vanilla cake recipe adapted from the brilliant Rose Levy Beranbaum. She makes most things perfect, so you can trust this recipe. The cake layers are moist yet dense and stable enough to handle the soak and cream filling this cake sports.

The Filling

Once the layers are baked, cooled, and ready for stacking, we make the mascarpone cream frosting by beating together the cheese, sugar, cream, and Kahlua. Next, we soak the cakes in some coffee and liquor mainly because that’s what you do with tiramisu but also because booze and caffeine are the lifeblood of any decent parent, AMIRITE!?! I chose to assemble this tiramisu cake in the same way that I stack my naked cakes in order to keep the layers tidy and pretty, but if you’re desperate to just face-plant into the cake and don’t care what it looks like you can totally bypass this step. Once assembled, the cake take a long nap in the fridge before it’s ready to be served and enjoyed.

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! The Wood and Spoon Blog.

Finishing the Cake

Even though I’m a sucker for cake in general, somehow this tiramisu cake gets to me. The texture, the flavors, the way it reminds me of the many slices of tiramisu that I’ve had before- everything just screams “YES!” to me. This tiramisu cake gets better over time, so it’s a great dessert to make ahead, store in the fridge, and serve a day or two later. The coffee soak and mascarpone whipped cream filling keep the cake moist, so you can continue to enjoy it 3, 4, maybe even 5 days after preparing it. No guarantees it will go that long uneaten though.

If you’re in a rush and don’t want to fuss with a homemade cake, of course you can substitute a box cake mix, but keep in mind that there will be enough mascarpone filling for 3 layers of cake, so you’ll need more than a single box of cake mix. Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! Naked Cake by The Wood and Spoon Blog

You guys know me. I make no qualms about having my ducks in a row or always knowing what to do when it comes to stuff like being a mom, wife, or official potty trainer. But this tiramisu cake? You can bank on it. Give the recipe a try let me know what you think! If you need me, I’ll be over here in the land of Skittles and mini toddler-sized toilets, s if you have any words of wisdom on managing the bowels of tiny humans, I’ll gladly listen. Happy Tuesday and cheers to you!

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Tiramisu Cake

This tiramisu cake is three layers of vanilla cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and frosted with a creamy mascarpone whipped cream.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: 10
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

For the cake layers

  • 4 cups (400 gm) cake flour
  • 2 cups sugar (400 gm)
  • 2 tablespoons (30 gm) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks, 230 gm) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) buttermilk, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla

For the soak

  • 3/4 cup (180 mL) strong brewed coffee (warm or cold, doesn’t matter)
  • 1/4 cup (60 mL) Kahlua or coffee liquor
  • 12 teaspoons espresso powder (optional)

For the mascarpone whipped cream

  • 16 ounces (460 gm) mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • 8 ounces (230 gm) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (170 gm) powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Kahlua
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ cup (30 gm) cocoa powder

Instructions

To prepare the cake layers

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease three 8” round pans. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of each one for easy removal, if desired.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients until well dispersed, about 30 seconds. Add the softened butter and ¾ of the buttermilk to the dry ingredients. Keep the mixer on low until slightly combined and then increase to medium speed and beat for 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the rest of the buttermilk and one egg and beat on low for 30 seconds to incorporate. Add the additional egg and the vanilla and beat for another 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated batter.
  3. Spread the batter evenly among the three pans and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes. A toothpick inserted should come out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove from pan and remain cooling on a rack until room temperature. If you don’t plan to use the cakes immediately, wrap tightly in plastic wrap.

To prepare the soak

  1. Combine the coffee and coffee liquor in a small bowl. Taste the mixture. If it doesn’t have a strong coffee flavor, you can sprinkle in some of the espresso powder for an extra punch of coffee. If you would prefer a more mild coffee flavor, this is not necessary.

To prepare the mascarpone whipped cream

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a medium sized bowl, beat together the mascarpone cheese and cream cheese until combined and smooth, about 1-2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the powdered sugar and Kahlua and beat briefly to combine. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream until stiff peaks form. To do this, start the mixer on low and beat until the cream gets frothy. Increase the speed to high and beat until the whipping cream has barely thickened enough to stand up in straight peaks on its own. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture until smooth.

To assemble the cake

  1. Level all three cake layers using a serrated knife. (Note: I find it easiest to level cakes when they are still partially frozen.) Use a basting or pastry brush to “‘soak” each cake layer with the soak. Continue adding the coffee liquid to the cakes until they are well moistened, but not to where the coffee has dredged all the way through and has made the cake fall apart. You may not use all of the soak.
  2. On top of one soaked cake layer, spread about 1-1/4-1-1/2 cups of the mascarpone whipped cream and smooth out the top. Add an additional cake layer on top and repeat this process. Add the final cake layer to the top of the cake and spread a generous amount of whipped cream on top. Continue frosting the sides as well.
  3. You can allow the cake to chill and firm up in the fridge for a few hours if desired, or you can serve it immediately. I prefer to allow the cake to sit in the fridge so that the cake layers can continue to soften and soak up the coffee and the cream.
  4. Prior to serving, use a sifter to sprinkle some cocoa powder on top of the cake.

Notes

  • Notes: To prepare the cake as I did, as a naked cake, see the link in the post, or find the confetti ice cream cake in my blog archives. There are directions there for how to assemble a naked cake.
  • If you have another favorite recipe for a vanilla or white cake, feel free to substitute here.
  • If you choose not to prepare the cake in a “naked’ fashion, consider chilling the whipped cream in the fridge briefly so that it can firm up a bit. This will help keep the cream from just squishing out the sides when you stack your cakes.

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Cake Recipe Adapted from: The Cake Bible