you need to know

YOU NEED TO KNOW: How to Make Ganache (and Homemade Chocolate Truffles!)

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

There are a few recipes that every home baker needs to know like the back of their hand. Ganache, with only two ingredients and two steps to create it, is one of a few baking fundamentals that can elevate homemade dishes to sweet, chocolatey bliss. Despite its simplicity, ganache often scares bakers away from attempting to make it themselves at home. Today, in an effort to conquer this Everest, we are going to cover the basics on ganache so that you can create decadent, chocolate dishes with ease from here on out. We’re also going to learn how to make 4 different types of homemade chocolate truffles from a single ganache base, so if you’re interested in making some treats for your valentine (or yourself, no judgement here!), this is a post you’ll want to listen in on. Let’s get started!

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

What Is It?

Ganache is the mixture of warmed cream and chocolate. It can be used to glaze, fill, coat, or whip into baked goods and desserts. Ganache can take on a variety of forms depending on the cream to chocolate ratio; the concentration and preparation of these two ingredients will alter the final product.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com
The three different types of ganache, photographed just after being mixed together.

How Do You Make It?

All ganaches begin by heating heavy whipping cream until hot but not boiling. The warm cream is poured over finely chopped chocolate and allowed to rest for a few minutes. Once the chocolate has melted enough to be stirred into the cream. When combined, the chocolate and cream transform into a smooth and rich liquid that we know as ganache.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

What Are the Different Types of Ganache?

The proportion of cream to chocolate will determine how viscous your final product will be. A higher cream:chocolate weight ratio will land you a more thin chocolate glaze. Likewise, a ganache with more chocolate than cream will result in a thick, fudgy texture. Here are three basic cream:chocolate ratios that you need to know.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

1:1 – One part cream to one part chocolate

Using the same weight of cream and chocolate will result in a thick fudge sauce consistency. When warm, this ganache can be poured thickly over cakes, breads, and ice cream. When chilled, the ganache can be used to fill cakes, pastries, and tarts. If whipped, this ganache ratio will transform into a hardening frosting that is perfect for cakes to be covered in fondant. You might remember this ganache from marble loaf pound cake .

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com
1:1 Ganache after cooling for a bit.
1:2 – One part cream to two parts chocolate

Ganache will become thick and viscous as you increase the amount of chocolate to cream. The more chocolate, the thicker it will be. We will use this ratio later today to prepare homemade truffles, but you might remember a similarly rich ganache from the mint chocolate sandwich cookies.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com
2:1 ganache after cooling a bit.
2:1 – Two parts cream to one part chocolate

When warm, this ganache will be a thin, pourable glaze that can be used to coat baked goods, but when allowed to cool, this ganache ratio will whip into a light and fluffy frosting that will stay soft upon setting.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com
1:2 ganache before and after whipping.

What Else Do I Need to Know About Ganache?

There’s a few other things that will affect your final ganache. First: time and temperature. A warm, freshly made ganache will be a bit more loose than one that has been resting at room temperature or chilled overnight in the fridge. Given enough time and cool temperatures, all ganaches will firm up somewhat from their warm state. For example, if you’ve prepared a thick ganache with more chocolate than cream, you’ll find the ganache is pourable and saucy while warm, but will harden up to a firm, malleable consistency after some time in the fridge. Cold ganache will always be more firm than a warm one, so if you find that your final outcome is not as thick as you anticipated, it may be that you just need to let it rest a bit more.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

The type of chocolate that you choose to use will also affect your final ganache. While most recipes call for bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, ganache can be made with white or milk chocolate as well. The type of chocolate you choose will affect the flavor and texture of your ganache, so be sure to use chocolate that you would normally enjoy eating on its own.

Finally, ganache can be flavored with a few simple add-ins. Extracts, liquors, and even nut butters can be whisked into a warm ganache to to add flavor the the chocolate base. I’ll share a few simple variations below, but be sure to tell me if you have any favorites that I need to try!

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

Homemade Chocolate Truffles

Let’s be honest. There’s nothing sweeter than romance via chocolate on Valentine’s Day and no better way to share that love than by making homemade chocolate truffles. Now that you’ve mastered ganache, you can easily prepare 4 different homemade chocolate truffles to show love to your boo thang. Of course there’s a million other options, but here are a few rich candies to get started with:

Simple Chocolate Truffles

The gold standard for chocolate candies, these babies are the most basic form of truffle, prepared by scooping firm rounds of chilled ganache and rolling it in cocoa powder. These are perfect for the more-is-more kind of chocolate lover in your life.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

Peanut Butter Chocolate Truffles

Here, peanut butter is stirred into the warm ganache before it’s chilled to a thick consistency. Once firm, simply scoop small mounds of chocolate to roll and refrigerate until cold. The chilled balls are then dipped in a coating of melted chocolate and sprinkled with chopped peanuts.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

Dark Chocolate Truffles with Sea Salt

Simple, rich, and decadent are these truffles, made by preparing a dark chocolate ganache with the addition of sea salt. Once chilled, balls of ganache are dipped in dark chocolate, and a sprinkle of sea salt gives these little guys a sophisticated look with that sweet and salty taste.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

Hazelnut Chocolate Truffles

Similar to the peanut butter truffles, these hazelnut truffles are made by stirring chocolate hazelnut spread into the warm ganache. I like to roll the chilled truffles in chopped hazelnuts, but certainly you could dip these in chocolate as well.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

A Few Other Chocolate Truffle Filling Variations:

Boozy Truffles: Add 1 tablespoon of rum, bourbon, coffee or orange liqueur into the warm chocolate ganache recipe.

Vanilla Truffles: Add 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract to the warm chocolate ganache. Roll the finished balls in powdered sugar.

Coconut Truffles: Add 1/2 teaspoon coconut extract to the warm chocolate ganache and roll the finished balls in toasted sweetened coconut.

Peppermint Truffles: Add 1/4 teaspoon peppermint extract to the warm chocolate ganache and roll the finished balls in crushed candy canes.

You Need to Know How to Make Ganache and Homemade Chocolate Truffles by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This simple tutorial will teach you the ins and out of preparing ganache from bittersweet , milk, semisweet, dark, or white chocolate. From there, learn to make a few different types of truffles including coconut, orange, coffee, peppermint, hazelnut, Nutella, peanut butter, and sea salt. This recipe and how to will teach you how to make pourable glaze, whipped, thick and fudgy filling ganache, and more. Find the recipe and learn how to make homemade candy for Valentine's Day on thewoodandspoon.com

Ok, I’m Obsessed with Ganache. How Do I Get Started?!

Ganache and homemade truffles are one of the easiest recipes you’ll make all year. Once you know how to make a base ganache you can make a ton of different treats like peanut butter chocolate cheesecake, mint brownie ice cream cake, and pretzel millionaire bars. With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, you’ll be glad to have this technique in your pocket, and you honey booboo will be even more thrilled. Give these homemade chocolate truffles a try and let me know what you think! #MonthofChocolate will continue next week, so stay tuned for more milky cocoa goodness!

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Chocolate Ganache

Making homemade ganache is simple and only requires two ingredients. Use some basic ratios to learn how to make the perfect ganache your recipe needs!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 5
  • Total Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • Dark Chocolate, finely chopped
  • Heavy Whipping Cream

Instructions

  1. Place the chocolate in a bowl and set aside while you prepare the cream.Warm the cream in a saucepan over medium-low heat until cream is hot and beginning to steam. Do not boil.
  2. Pour the warm cream over the chopped chocolate and cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Allow it to rest about 5 minutes, and then use a spoon or spatula to stir the chocolate and cream together. If the chocolate is not completely melted you can microwave the chocolate and cream together in 15 second increments, stirring until the two have combined. 
  3. Allow the ganache to cool to your desired consistency. You can expedite this process by placing the bowl in the refrigerator. Stir it regularly to keep it uniform in consistency.

Notes

For a thick glaze/ cake or pie filling:

  • Use a 1:1 chocolate to cream ratio.
  • Weigh equal amounts of cream and chocolate. For example, you may use 2 ounces of heavy whipping cream and 2 ounces of chocolate to make 4 ounces of ganache.
  • If you plan to frost a cake with this ganache, allow it to cool and then whip with a paddle attachment until fluffy in the bowl of a stand mixer. 

For truffle thick ganache:

  • Use a 1:2 cream to chocolate ratio.
  • Weigh out double the amount of chocolate to cream. For example, you might combine 2 ounces of cream and 4 ounces of chocolate to make 6 ounces of truffle thick ganache. 
  • If you plan to use this ganache to make truffles, chill the ganache until it is firm enough to scoop.

For a thin glaze/ whipped ganache:

  • Use a 2:1 cream to chocolate ratio.
  • Weigh out double the amount of cream than chocolate. For example, you might combine 4 ounces of cream and 2 ounces of chocolate to prepare 6 ounces of thin ganache. 
  • For whipped ganache, allow the cream to set out or chill in the fridge until slightly thickened and viscous. Place in the bowl of a stand mixer and use the whisk attachment to beat until light and fluffy. Be sure to not overbeat- you may make butter!

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Homemade Truffles

If you know how to make ganache, these homemade truffles are a cinch! Four variations will make for a beautiful homemade dessert!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 18

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces (115 gm) bittersweet chocolate, chopped
  • 2 ounces (60 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • Cocoa powder (for classic truffles)
  • 1/4 cup (60 gm) creamy peanut butter (for peanut butter truffles)
  • 6 tablespoons (90 gm) chocolate hazelnut spread (for hazelnut truffles)
  • Sea Salt (for dark chocolate truffles)
  • 1 cup (180 gm) chopped bittersweet or semisweet chocolate for dipping, optional
  • Toasted peanuts or hazelnuts, finely chopped, optional

Instructions

  1. Place the chopped chocolate in a small mixing bowl
  2. Heat the heavy whipping cream until hot. Pour over the chocolate, stir to combine, and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Allow to rest 5 minutes and then stir to combine until smooth. Microwave in 15 second increments if the chocolate is not thoroughly melted. If you plan to make classic truffles, refrigerate this mixture until firmed but still malleable. Scoop out 2 teaspoon sized balls and roll them in cocoa powder. Refrigerate to firm and then serve at room temperature. 

For peanut butter truffles:

  1. Stir the peanut butter into the warm ganache and place in the fridge to chill. Once the ganache is set but still scoopable, spoon 2 teaspoon sized balls (I use a small cookie scoop) of ganache and roll gently in your hands. Place the balls back in the fridge to cool. In the meantime, melt the additional chocolate in a double boiler set over medium-low heat. Roll each chilled ball in the melted chocolate and place on a piece of parchment or wax paper to set. Sprinkle with chopped peanuts and cool completely in the fridge.

For hazelnut truffles:

  1. Stir the chocolate hazelnut spread into the warm ganache and place in the fridge to chill. Once the ganache is set but still scoopable, spoon 2 teaspoon sized balls (I use a small cookie scoop) of ganache and roll gently in your hands. Roll each ball in the finely chopped hazelnuts and place in the fridge to set. 

For sea salt truffles: 

  1. Sprinkle in a small pinch of salt and stir to combine. Place in the fridge to chill. Once the ganache is set but still scoopable, spoon 2 teaspoon sized balls (I use a small cookie scoop) of ganache and roll gently in your hands. In the meantime, melt the additional chocolate in a double boiler set over medium-low heat. Roll each chilled ball in the melted chocolate and place on a piece of parchment or wax paper to set. Sprinkle with sea salt and allow to firm up at room temperature or in the fridge. 

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YOU NEED TO KNOW: How to Make Whipped Cream

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com

There’s a few skills that every baker, professional and novice alike, needs to have in their repertoire. This is the second installment in the “You Need to Know” series where we explore basic baking techniques and tap into the know-how that is required to master them. In today’s edition, we are going to whip our way to the cloud-like heaven that is perfectly whipped cream, so if you need to know the ins and outs, keep reading!

What is it?

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com

Whipped cream is cream or heavy cream that has been whipped. Throughout the process, the texture changes from a fatty liquid to a light and fluffy foam. As the cream whips, air bubbles incorporate into the fat, resulting in an airy mixture that is approximately double the volume of the original liquid. A high amount of fat is required for the whipped cream to be stable, so heavy whipping cream or one that contains at least 30% fat is typically recommended for best outcomes.

How do you make it?

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com

You can make whipped cream in a number of ways. First, you can use a chilled bowl and wire whisk, a hand mixer, a stand mixer, or even a a glass jar with a lid!  The key is to start with very cold cream. The fat in the cream will melt at warmer temperatures, resulting in a lack of stability for the emulsification. I prefer to make my whipped cream with a hand mixer fitted with the beater attachments; I find it a lot easier to monitor the progress of your whipped cream this way. Feel free to use whatever you have on hand and feel comfortable working with.

Step One: Begin whipping!

Pour the cream into a mixing bowl and whip at low speed. If you are using a stand mixer, I use the whisk attachment on speed 2 or 4. Beat the mixture steadily until you notice the cream beginning to froth and barely thicken.

Step Two: Add sweetener and flavoring!

Once your cream is frothy, it is stable enough to add sweeteners and flavoring. For a traditional sweetened whipped cream, a small portion of granulated or powdered sugar is typically used. Alternatively, you can use honey, brown sugar, or even agave nectar. The color and texture may differ slightly, but all should yield successful results. Vanilla extract, lemon zest, almond extract, or even cocoa powder can be added to your cream for flavor; just use in moderation, adding only until the desired flavor is achieved.

Step Three: Watch for peaks!

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com

After the add-ins have been included, continue whipping and increase the speed. The cream transforms from a bubbly liquid to a thickened mixture. You might notice a trace of the beater or whisk as it spins around the bowl. Man your post at the mixer; once the cream begins to thicken, you’re only a few moments away from perfect whipped cream. Keep whipping and watching, and you’ll soon notice soft and fluffy mounds forming on the top of the cream, finally increasing in volume to thick, smooth clouds that barely billow up onto themselves in the bowl.

Once your cream gets close to doubling in volume, turn off your mixer and pull the whisk from the bowl. The cream is adequately whipped once it holds its shape on the end of the whisk without wilting over or plopping off the end of the attachment. Be sure to not over-beat the cream- you may end up with butter!

What if I over-beat it?

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.comIf you continue beating your cream beyond the point of whipped cream, you’ll notice small lumps in your bowl, forming a grainy, thick mixture. Don’t fret- as long as you haven’t breached the fine line between whipped cream and butter, you can still rescue it! Add a few extra tablespoons of cream into your bowl and slowly whisk it into the mixture. If it’s not beyond repair, the mixture will smooth right back out and you’ll be back in the game. If you happened to take it too far, that’s okay too! You’re well on your way to making fresh, homemade butter, and we all know there’s plenty of room in the kitchen for that.

What do I use it for?

How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com
Cream whipped to medium peaks, perfect to be used as a topping!
How To Make Whipped Cream Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a step by step picture explanation of how to whip cream. Starting with heavy whipping cream and using a wire whisk, hand blender, or stand mixer, this tutorial will give you the recipe for soft, medium, and stiff peaks - even to the point of making your own butter! Learn how to make whipped topping on thewoodandspoon.com
Cream whipped to firm/stiff peaks- perfect for folding into a no-churn ice cream or icebox pie!

Whipped cream is an excellent topping for cakes, pies, coffees, and sundaes, but is often incorporated into recipes in a number of other ways. You may fold whipped cream into trifles or cream pies, no-churn ice cream or icebox cakes. With nothing more than a bit of cream and a handful of fresh fruit, you are well on your way to preparing a simple dessert that takes little time and zero fuss. Homemade whipped cream is fantastic on its own and adds a sweet and creamy mouthfeel when incorporated into homemade desserts.

Is there anything else I need to know?

Yep, probably, so if you want to get your nerd on, be sure to check out this article. If you’re interested in more photos of the different phases of whipped cream, this post from King Arthur Flour is really helpful. And if you’re just wanting some inspiration on how to use whipped cream, be sure to check out this page of my blog that includes a number of recipes requiring a little fluff of cream.

To all of my American friends, have a great Labor Day! Be sure to reference this post next time you need a little whipped cream in your life. And don’t forget to vote for the Saveur Blog Awards! The polls are open until Wednesday, the 6th of September, and you can find me in the “Best Baking and Sweets” category. Have a great week!

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Homemade Sweetened Whipped Cream

Learn how to make whipped cream, step by step with photos, in this quick and simple tutorial.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Total Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (240 mL) heavy whipping cream, very cold
  • 3 tablespoons sugar

Instructions

  1. Pour the cream into a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer. Beat on medium-low speed until the mixture becomes frothy and foamy. Add the sugar. Increase the speed to high and whip until you notice traces of the mixer attachment in the cream. Continue whipping, watching carefully, until the mixture thickens into smooth pillowy clouds, nearly doubles in size, and barely holds its shape on the end of the whisk attachment. Use immediately. 

Notes

  • For vanilla whipped cream: add 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • For chocolate whipped cream: add 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • For honey whipped cream: add 3 tablespoons good honey in place of the sugar.
  • For lemon whipped cream: add 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest or more, according to your preferences. 

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