Month: March 2017

Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Guys, if you thought you liked eating regular tiramisu, just wait until you see what happens when you stack it like a birthday cake. Straight up MAGICAL. Making this tiramisu cake is one of the better choices I’ve made recently. Unlike some things in life, this cake is a no-brainer. 

Someone recently asked me if Brett and I planned to have any more children. At the time, I think I was bouncing a fussy George on one hip while Aimee cried loudly from time out in the next room over. I diffused that question with a laugh and gestured towards the two crying babies as if to say, “Ha! Not any time soon.”

One of my (many) prerequisites for having more children is that someone has to be potty trained. Someone needs to be able to manage their own bathroom situation without mom having to get involved. I can’t simultaneously change the diaper of one child and wipe the bottom of another while a newborn is latched on to my boob. Moms may have superpowers but I’ve only got two hands, okay?

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

Brett and I have spent the last few months casually trying to potty train Aimee, and while there have been some major improvements, we’re just not quite there yet. In fact, I’m convinced Aimee is pretty much using the toilet to scratch her itch for candy. “Mama, if Aimee goes peepee on the potty, I get candy?” “Mama, Aimee sat on the potty at school today- you give me candy?” “Mama, come look in the potty! There’s peepee! Aimee get candy!” You can’t blame the girl. IT’S CANDY. It’s practically a form of currency for toddlers. (Sidenote: Please watch this bit of Jerry Seinfeld standup where he talks about kids and candy. HILARIOUS.)

So I’ve basically resorted to whoring out our candy drawer for any degree of bathroom activity, because I am desperate to get out of this phase of life where I have to change two sets of diapers. Unfortunately, no amount of candy can stand up against the wants of a stubborn child. Aimee, my strong-willed beauty, who even at 2 years old already has unique certainty of who she is and what she wants, has decided she does not want to be entirely potty trained. She is perfectly content to wear a pull-up 24/7, and no amount of begging, bribing, encouragement or discipline will change that until she is ready. So what’s a girl to do? Let the kid eat, breathe, sleep in the bathroom just in case she decides to go? That sounds sanitary. Maybe keep changing the diapers? That sounds tiresome. Maybe I’ll just pour a cocktail and let dad do the work. Wait, that actually sounds brilliant…Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog // thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!I’ve only been doing this for a couple of years, so I don’t have all of the mom stuff figured out yet. What I do know is cake. So let’s talk about that instead. 

This tiramisu cake is decadent. A take on the old Italian classic, this cake is three layers of creamy, coffee, moist cakey goodnesss and is a stunning way to transform an otherwise plain looking dessert. We start by baking the cake layers. I use a simple vanilla cake recipe adapted from the brilliant Rose Levy Beranbaum. She makes most things perfect, so you can trust this recipe. The cake layers are moist yet dense and stable enough to handle the soak and cream filling this cake sports.

Once the layers are baked, cooled, and ready for stacking, we make the mascarpone cream frosting by beating together the cheese, sugar, cream, and Kahlua. Next, we soak the cakes in some coffee and liquor mainly because that’s what you do with tiramisu but also because booze and caffeine are the lifeblood of any decent parent, AMIRITE!?! I chose to assemble this tiramisu cake in the same way that I stack my naked cakes in order to keep the layers tidy and pretty, but if you’re desperate to just face-plant into the cake and don’t care what it looks like you can totally bypass this step. Once assembled, the cake take a long nap in the fridge before it’s ready to be served and enjoyed.

Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! The Wood and Spoon Blog.

Even though I’m a sucker for cake in general, somehow this tiramisu cake gets to me. The texture, the flavors, the way it reminds me of the many slices of tiramisu that I’ve had before- everything just screams “YES!” to me. This tiramisu cake gets better over time, so it’s a great dessert to make ahead, store in the fridge, and serve a day or two later. The coffee soak and mascarpone whipped cream filling keep the cake moist, so you can continue to enjoy it 3, 4, maybe even 5 days after preparing it. No guarantees it will go that long uneaten though. If you’re in a rush and don’t want to fuss with a homemade cake, of course you can substitute a box cake mix, but keep in mind that there will be enough mascarpone filling for 3 layers of cake, so you’ll need more than a single box of cake mix. Tiramisu Cake Recipe By Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends! Naked Cake by The Wood and Spoon Blog

You guys know me. I make no qualms about having my ducks in a row or always knowing what to do when it comes to stuff like being a mom, wife, or official potty trainer. But this tiramisu cake? You can bank on it. If you’re a coffee lover, a cake lover, or a booze lover, this tiramisu cake is bound to make all of your dreams come true. Scouts honor.

Give the recipe a try let me know what you think! I think it’d be perfect for your next dinner party, birthday, or casual “It’s Wednesday and I love myself” gathering. If you need me, I’ll be over here in the land of Skittles and mini toddler-sized toilets, s if you have any words of wisdom on managing the bowels of tiny humans, I’ll gladly listen. Happy Tuesday and cheers to you!

 

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Espresso Caramel Thumbprint Cookies

Peppermint Bark Ice Cream Cake

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Tiramisu Cake

Tiramisu Cake Kate Wood of thewoodandspoon.com // Three layers of moist vanilla yellow cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and topped with a mascarpone cream cheese whipped cream frosting. Just like the classic Italian tiramisu recipe but fancy enough for a celebration or party. This is a great boozy dessert to share with friends!

This tiramisu cake is three layers of vanilla cake soaked in espresso and coffee liquor and frosted with a creamy mascarpone whipped cream.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: 10 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake layers

  • 4 cups (400 gm) cake flour
  • 2 cups sugar (400 gm)
  • 2 tablespoons (30 gm) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks, 230 gm) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) buttermilk, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla

For the soak

  • 3/4 cup (180 mL) strong brewed coffee (warm or cold, doesn’t matter)
  • 1/4 cup (60 mL) Kahlua or coffee liquor
  • 12 teaspoons espresso powder (optional)

For the mascarpone whipped cream

  • 16 ounces (460 gm) mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • 8 ounces (230 gm) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 11/2 cups (170 gm) powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Kahlua
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ cup (30 gm) cocoa powder

Instructions

To prepare the cake layers

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease three 8” round pans. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of each one for easy removal, if desired.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients until well dispersed, about 30 seconds. Add the softened butter and ¾ of the buttermilk to the dry ingredients. Keep the mixer on low until slightly combined and then increase to medium speed and beat for 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the rest of the buttermilk and one egg and beat on low for 30 seconds to incorporate. Add the additional egg and the vanilla and beat for another 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated batter.
  3. Spread the batter evenly among the three pans and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes. A toothpick inserted should come out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then remove from pan and remain cooling on a rack until room temperature. If you don’t plan to use the cakes immediately, wrap tightly in plastic wrap.

To prepare the soak

  1. Combine the coffee and coffee liquor in a small bowl. Taste the mixture. If it doesn’t have a strong coffee flavor, you can sprinkle in some of the espresso powder for an extra punch of coffee. If you would prefer a more mild coffee flavor, this is not necessary.

To prepare the mascarpone whipped cream

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a medium sized bowl, beat together the mascarpone cheese and cream cheese until combined and smooth, about 1-2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the powdered sugar and Kahlua and beat briefly to combine. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream until stiff peaks form. To do this, start the mixer on low and beat until the cream gets frothy. Increase the speed to high and beat until the whipping cream has barely thickened enough to stand up in straight peaks on its own. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture until smooth.

To assemble the cake

  1. Level all three cake layers using a serrated knife. (Note: I find it easiest to level cakes when they are still partially frozen.) Use a basting or pastry brush to “‘soak” each cake layer with the soak. Continue adding the coffee liquid to the cakes until they are well moistened, but not to where the coffee has dredged all the way through and has made the cake fall apart. You may not use all of the soak.
  2. On top of one soaked cake layer, spread about 1-1/4-1-1/2 cups of the mascarpone whipped cream and smooth out the top. Add an additional cake layer on top and repeat this process. Add the final cake layer to the top of the cake and spread a generous amount of whipped cream on top. Continue frosting the sides as well.
  3. You can allow the cake to chill and firm up in the fridge for a few hours if desired, or you can serve it immediately. I prefer to allow the cake to sit in the fridge so that the cake layers can continue to soften and soak up the coffee and the cream.
  4. Prior to serving, use a sifter to sprinkle some cocoa powder on top of the cake.

Notes

  • Notes: To prepare the cake as I did, as a naked cake, see the link in the post, or find the confetti ice cream cake in my blog archives. There are directions there for how to assemble a naked cake.
  • If you have another favorite recipe for a vanilla or white cake, feel free to substitute here.
  • If you choose not to prepare the cake in a “naked’ fashion, consider chilling the whipped cream in the fridge briefly so that it can firm up a bit. This will help keep the cream from just squishing out the sides when you stack your cakes.

Cake Recipe Adapted from: The Cake Bible

Triple Chocolate Cookies

Triple Chocolate Cookies Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A rich, soft, and chewy dark chocolate chip cookies with crispy crunchy edges and gooey white and milk / semisweet chocolate chips. This recipe used dutch processed cocoa powder and tastes even better with salty flakes of sea salt on top. This is a simple, one bowl cookie that the whole family will love and will feed a crowd.

I want to tell you all about these super simple, super sweet, super everything triple chocolate cookies, but first, I need to tell you about the super hilarious absurdity that is my life. About one of those moments where you’re uncertain, embarrassed, and possibly even peeing your pants with terror. I need to tell you about skiing.

This past week, we made the trek to Big Sky, Montana for a weekend of skiing with our friends. All and all, it was a great trip, complete with lots of laughter, a few new jokes, and (bonus!) no major injuries. While I had a terrific time, there’s no denying that I experienced a bit of anxiety. You see, this was only my second ski trip ever, my first being about two years ago when we visited Park City, Utah. Ohh, that first trip was a doozie.

I got to Park City determined to dominate the sport, and the first morning of ski school went by with flying colors. Strap on boots- check. Snap on skis- check. Walk with skis on, learn the pizza wedge, figure out how to get on the magic carpet- check, check, check. I was a natural. In my mind, I had graduated from the bunny slopes and was totally prepared for anything. We went down a few dinky runs (one was called “The Turtle” if that gives you any indication of the speed I was moving), and after a few successful runs, I was cocky enough to George Jefferson myself to the big leagues.

Triple Chocolate Cookies
Forgive the iPhone photos… no one needed for me to attempt to bring my SLR up the mountain.
Triple Chocolate Cookies
Mom, just in case you’re wondering, I’m not pregnant… just in my marshmallow coat.

Let’s sidebar for a few words of wisdom: a little humility goes a long way. I highly recommend participating in a few activities each year that you utterly suck at, because it’s not cool to be good at everything. Nobody likes the guy or gal who makes everything look effortless. Sometimes you need a little snow shoved in your face to remember that you aren’t the king of the world. Sometimes you need to look like an obese marshmallow sliding recklessly down a snowy abyss to keep your head out of the clouds.

To be clear, I was not ready for the big leagues. I wasn’t even ready to leave The Turtle. I got up to the top of that mountain (read: barely halfway up the side of a slightly more challenging, baby-sized green run), and the wheels fell off. Fear completely took over and I forgot everything I had learned in my morning of ski school. I felt like I was flying down the mountain, and not in a cool, sporty, Lindsey Vonn kind of way. It was more of like a car-on-fire-driving-through-an-oil-spill, bear-running-with-his-head-stuck-in-a-beehive, Mario-skidding-out-of-control-on-Donkey-Kong’s-banana-peel kind of way. I was like a bat out of hell with zero control and it. was. terrifying. After falling, I don’t know, maybe 30 times, it was game over. My chest got tight and I could feel my eyes burning with tears, and I knew there was no way I could make it down in one piece. Absurdly, I had probably only gone 20 yards total so far- there was a long way to go.

Triple Chocolate Cookies

Triple Chocolate Cookies
I discovered that après ski is my favorite- cocktails and jacuzzi. The French make everything sound sexy, don’t they?

My husband, who was skiing with me at the time, tried to talk me off of the mental cliff I was about to jump off of. Now, when he shares the story, he likes to tell people that I had convinced myself that I was going to ski off the mountain, break every bone in my body, and probably catch fire just before crushing through 10 feet of snowy dirt (I still maintain this is possible). I snow-plowed the rest of the way down the hill which took about 45 minutes between all of the hyperventilation, tears, and overall panic-induced spasming that was happening in my body. I had lost it.

Although I made a pact after that trip to never ski again, I got suckered into the trip that happened this past weekend. I’m proud to say that I made some improvements, and am actually looking forward to another ski trip in the future. Although I’m still pretty amateur hour and there’s still a bit of anxiety, I skied, I didn’t cry, and darnit, that’s just about all I need to convince myself that there’s hope. The moral of the story is this: be brave enough to try new things. Don’t let anyone (including yourself) tell you you can’t do something. If you fall off the horse (or the mountain), get back on again. And finally, if you’re skiing for the first time and have previously birthed 2 children, adult diapers are your friend. (TMI? Check yes or no.)

Triple Chocolate Cookies

Triple Chocolate Cookies

These triple chocolate cookies have absolutely nothing to do with skiing. Nothing. But they’re kinda perfect cookies, and lest you think I’m some kind of magical genie who does everything in life as well as I baked these treats, you now have embarrassing evidence of that time I wet my pants and cried my way down a tiny snow-covered hill. Remember, humility is good, right?

A dark chocolate cookie dough, chewy and soft-baked, with semisweet and white chocolate chips, these triple chocolate cookies are every chocolate lover’s dream. The dough is relatively simple and almost pitch-black thanks to the addition of dark cocoa powder. Once a few of the regulars are added (eggs, vanilla, flour, etc.), we toss in the chocolate chips. You can use any of your favorites, but since the dough is dark and slightly salty, I like the sweetness of semi and white chocolate. If you like extra salty cookies, you can add a sprinkling of sea salt at the end like I did. It makes these cookies look extra fancy and balances out the sweet chocolate chips. 

Triple Chocolate Cookies

Triple Chocolate Cookies

A friend who tried these triple chocolate cookies  told me that they tasted like the Domino cookies at Subway, and somehow, that is in no way disappointing. I love the familiarity of this cookie, and respect it for its crowd-pleasing abilities. Triple chocolate cookies sound decadent and special, yet somehow are approved by the masses- anyone can enjoy this treat. Unless they don’t like chocolate, in which case, their vote doesn’t count.

I’d love to hear about your skiing tips or recommendations- does anyone have a favorite place to vacay? Brett and I are planning to take another trip next winter so that I can improve my skills before our kiddos are old enough to hit the slopes. If we happen to see each other on the mountain, my advice to you is this: stay out of my way. Newbie over here, remember? Give these triple chocolate cookies a try and let me know what you think! Cheers and happy Wednesday!

Triple Chocolate Cookies

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Chocolate Cake

 

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Triple Chocolate Cookies

Triple Chocolate Cookies Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A rich, soft, and chewy dark chocolate chip cookies with crispy crunchy edges and gooey white and milk / semisweet chocolate chips. This recipe used dutch processed cocoa powder and tastes even better with salty flakes of sea salt on top. This is a simple, one bowl cookie that the whole family will love and will feed a crowd.

A dark chocolate cookie dough filled with semisweet and white chocolate chips, these triple chocolate cookies and rich, dark, sweet and salty.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 17 1x
Scale

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup (11/2 sticks/ 170 gm) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup (150 gm) packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (100 gm) sugar
  • 1 egg (50 gm out of shell)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (130 gm) flour
  • 3/4 cup (70 gm) dutch process/ dark cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon (8 gm) cornstarch
  • 1 cup (180 gm) white chocolate chips
  • 1 cup (180 gm) semisweet chocolate chips
  • Fleur de Sel or Sea Salt, if desired

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and prepare two sheet pans with parchment paper or silicone baking sheets.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugars on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the egg and vanilla extract and beat until combined. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cornstarch, beating just until almost combined. Add the chocolate chips and continue beating until ingredients are well incorporated.
  3. Scoop 3 tablespoon sized scoops (I use a large cookie scoop) of cookie dough out 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets. Sprinkle with sea salt, if you desire a saltier cookie. If the dough has gotten too soft, chill briefly in the fridge for about 5 minutes. Bake for 12-15 minutes until edges of the cookie are set. The center of the cookie may still seem slightly underdone. Allow to cool completely on the baking sheet or on a cooling rack.

Notes

  • If you use a smaller mound of dough, your baking time will alter. Bake until the edges are set and the center looks nearly done.
  • If your first pan of cookies doesn’t spread enough, your dough may be too cold! If it spreads too much, you can firm up the dough in the fridge for the next batch.

Funfetti Scones

Funfetti Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Simple, fast, easy one bowl cream scones that taste just like a box mix birthday cake! These scones use clear vanilla and sprinkles to make the sweet confetti flavor. The icing is a simple powdered sugar glaze speckled with more rainbow jimmies. Find the Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com along with more breakfast or brunch ideas to go with your coffee and tea time!

This past week was one for the books. 5 sick humans, 30 loads of laundry, 2 cans of Lysol, and 4 missed work days- basically a nightmare. Times like these call for a pinch of happy, like these funfetti scones, to put a pep in our step and make an otherwise blah day a tad bit brighter, don’t you think?

We kept our 11 month old nephew last weekend who brought with him lots of snuggling, some cute baby noises, and… the stomach bug. I’m not going to sugar coat it- it was bad. You know how sometimes you catch a whiff of the bug, maybe get sick once, eat a bowl of chicken noodle soup, and 24 hours later you’re back at work and feeling great? Yeah. This was not that type of thing. Avoiding this bug was like trying to use an umbrella in the eye of a hurricane. It wasn’t “Will we get the bug?”, it was “When?”

Watching a baby deal with sickness is so pitiful. They’re uncomfortable and scared, and have no idea why you’re walking about wearing a pair of rubber gloves and a surgical mask. But just because they’re small does not mean that the mess is itty bitty as well. Up until this weekend, I’d never seen someone get sick in a fashion that I would describe with the word “projectile,” but after witnessing a 1-1/2″ diameter stream of vomit explode from a 25 pound baby like water from a firehose, I’d say I’ve officially checked that off of my list. In the living room, on the couch, in the kitchen, ON THE REFRIGERATOR. Basically everywhere except the toilet and the designated barf bucket saw a little stomach acid last weekend, and I’m still so grossed out about it that we actually need to stop talking about it. (Sidenote: What is the protocol on talking about this on the internet? Have I breached the line of decency? Sorry.)

Funfetti Scones

Needless to say, there wasn’t enough bleach and baby wipes to protect the masses, so the rest of our family went down quick. 5 days of Pedialyte and a few dozen episodes of “Paw Patrol” later, we were finally all back to our normal selves. Except that it was Saturday again, and we were all so fed up from being with each other, quarantined in the house, while our brains melted on account of the Lysol fumes and children’s television… we desperately needed a break. After what will from here on out be known as the “Stomach Bug Incident of 2017,” I am in awe of families that have to deal with chronic illness. If nothing else, the bug made me hugely grateful for children and a husband who are otherwise quite healthy.  

These funfetti scones were lifesavers. I had prepared and photographed these little treats a few days before Vom-fest 2017, so they were waiting for me in the freezer once I felt up to enjoying my morning coffee again.  A simple treat, made in one bowl with less than 10 ingredients, these funfetti scones are an easy fix and a spunky addition to any breakfast or afternoon tea routine. To prepare these little bite-sized bits of sunshine, we start by combining a few dry ingredients in a large bowl: flour, sugar, baking powder, and a handful of sprinkles! We fold in some heavy cream and a little bit of clear vanilla which provides these funfetti scones with that familiar sweet flavor that we all love of its box cake mix counterpart. Once combined into a sticky, wet dough, we pat it all out and shape our scones. You can cut small triangles as I did here, but squares, rounds, and larger shapes will work with the recipe as well! Your baking time will differ based on the shape and size you choose, but otherwise it makes no difference. The shaped scones get a brushing more of cream and a sprinkle of coarse sparkling sugar for a bit of added crunch, and after a brief bake, the funfetti scones are ready for a drizzle of icing. 

Funfetti Scones

Funfetti Scones

You can prepare these funfetti scones in advance and store in your freezer for a rainy (or sick) day, but I think they’re best served immediately. This recipe yields quite a few mini scones, which makes them the perfect addition to a breakfast gathering, study session, or group coffee date. You can half the recipe if you prefer a mini batch of mini scones, although no one will mind if you have a few extra treats for sharing. If you get a chance to make these little guys, let me know what you think about them in the comments section below!

Thanks for letting me vent about my family’s grossness. I hope you don’t officially hate me… we’re friends, so I feel like we can talk about the nitty gritty, right? Happy Thursday and cheers to you!

 

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Funfetti Scones

Funfetti Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Simple, fast, easy one bowl cream scones that taste just like a box mix birthday cake! These scones use clear vanilla and sprinkles to make the sweet confetti flavor. The icing is a simple powdered sugar glaze speckled with more rainbow jimmies. Find the Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com along with more breakfast or brunch ideas to go with your coffee and tea time!

These funfetti scones are a simple cream scone speckled with sprinkles and coarse sugar, and topped with a birthday cake icing.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 30 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the scones

  • 11/2 cups (190 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 11/2 cups (180 gm) cake flour
  • 1 tablespoon (9 gm) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup (100 gm) sugar
  • ½ cup (80 gm) rainbow sprinkles
  • 11/2 cups (360 mL) heavy cream, plus extra to brush on tops of scones
  • 11/2 tablespoons clear vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons sparkling sugar (optional)

For the glaze

  • 1 cup (130 gm) confectioner’s sugar
  • 1 teaspoon clear vanilla extract
  • Milk
  • Extra sprinkles for sprinkling (optional)

Instructions

To prepare the scones

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees and prepare a sheet pan with a sheet of parchment paper.
  2. In a medium/large bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder, salt, sugar, and sprinkles until combined. In a measuring cup, combine the heavy cream and vanilla extract. Pour the cream mixture on to the dry ingredients and fold or stir with a wooden spoon or spatula until evenly combined. Sprinkle in a tablespoon or two more flour if the dough is too sticky. It should be moist enough that there aren’t any dry pieces not sticking to the dough, but not so sticky that the dough is watery or doesn’t hold its shape.
  3. On a floured surface pat the dough out into a ¾” rectangle of dough. Do not overwork the dough. Using a sharp knife, cut out little triangles of dough, about 30 total. Alternatively, you can use a small biscuit cutter. Brush the tops of each with heavy cream using a pastry brush and sprinkle with the sparkling sugar, if desired. Place the pan of scones in the fridge or freezer for 10-15 minutes to rest as this will help the scones to rise well. Bake in the preheated oven for about 15 minutes or until the edges of the scones have browned and the center of the scones are no longer doughy. Allow the scones to cool for about 10 minutes before covering with glaze.

To prepare the glaze

  1. Combine the sugar and vanilla, adding just enough milk to get the glaze the consistency you desire. I typically use only enough to have a thin, pancake batter consistency glaze, so that I can drizzle it on but it will still hold its shape. After icing, sprinkle with extra sprinkles, if desired.

Notes

  • I use a combination of AP flour and cake flour because I think the cake flour gives it that box confetti cake taste that we all know and love. If you don’t have cake flour, you can sub in all-purpose flour.
  • Clear vanilla extract has a different flavor than regular vanilla extract and again, will give it that box cake mix taste that we are going for. You can sub in regular vanilla, but the flavor will most certainly be different.
  • If desired, you can pat all the dough out until it is ¾ inch thick and use a 2—1/2 inch biscuit cutter to make round scones instead. Baking time will differ.
  • You can sub in raw sugar for sparkling sugar, if desired.

Recipe Adapted From: King Arthur Flour

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A simple, fast recipe that takes less than 30 minutes. A quick brown sugar butter and pretzel pie crust filled with a no bake cream cheese cheesecake type filling and topped with fresh strawberries or berries of your choice. Recipe adapted from Bake from Scratch Magazine. Perfect make ahead dessert idea. Thewoodandspoon.com

Hey friends! I’ve got your weekend entertainment round-up here, complete with a few things to read and a bright and cheery strawberry pretzel tart that is just begging to be made.

This week was a cluster in our house, thanks to sick babies, unfinished to-do lists, and an underwhelming amount of time spent making myself looks presentable (Sorry, Brett. I swear I’ll change out of these sweatpants eventually.) Luckily, a few hours spent snuggling with my sick Aimee girl on the couch (read: trying not to let me brain melt from Lysol fumes and watching back to back episodes of “Paw Patrol”), I reacquainted myself with the interwebs and got caught up on what was going on in the world. For example: apparently Donald Trump is president? What? And someone announced the wrong winner for “Best Picture” at the Oscars? And Ryan Gosling is the world’s most perfect human? (Okay, kidding, guys. I’m not that out of touch.) Here’s a few things that have my eye this week:

50 Things We Learned About Feeding Kids in the Past 6 Years

This little article from Bon Appetit Magazine has so many truths in it. If you’re a parent, you have to give it a read. I promise you’ll identify with something. I’d like to add a few of my own learned lessons to the list:

  1. A tub of baby wipes is a legitimate tableware item.
  2. No one will known that there is Crown Royale in your water if you are drinking it from a Yeti cup.
  3. Squeeze packs counts as vegetable servings.
  4. (More seriously) Find a reason to celebrate at least once a week. Set a date and make a mealtime a party. It’s good for morale.

March Madness

March Madness starts next week! Ok, ok, I know that audience for this blog is primarily women aged 25-34, but it would be entirely sexist to assume that there aren’t at least a few women out there who are beyond excited to watch some basketball. Everyone likes to watch the University of Kentucky win, AMIRITE? Check out this link to get your bracket filled out before the whole shebang starts. And Go Cay-uts.

The Piglet

If basketball doesn’t do it for you, maybe cookbooks are more your thing. We are knee deep in the quarterfinal round of Food52’s tournament of cookbooks! 16 notable publishings from this past year face off in a NCAAstyle tournament to determine the best cookbook of the year! I’ve got my money on “Dorie’s Cookies” to take the whole thing.

La Pitchoune

Brett and I have some traveling coming up. I’m not going to tell you where or when we’re going, because, geez, I don’t really know who could be reading this! Maybe some Charles Manson psychopath character has been following this blog for some time just waiting for me to reveal my actual location. SORRY CHARLIE, NOT TODAY. But for future vacay planning purposes, I’m keeping this idea on the back burner: Julia Child’s summer home in Provence France that is now a vacation rental and cooking school. You sleep where she slept, cook where she cooked, and no, this is not a drill. Amazing, right?

Strawberry Pretzel TartStrawberry Pretzel Tart

If you’re planning to make a few treats this weekend, keep this strawberry pretzel tart in mind. This is a brown sugar and pretzel crusted tart, adapted from my favorite pretzel pie crust. It’s filled with a no-bake cheesecake filling of sorts and topped with sliced strawberries. With less than 30 minutes of active prep time and requiring less than 10 ingredients, this strawberry pretzel tart is a cinch to make and quite the looker. With spring strawberries just around the corner, this is the tart you’ll make from now until the very last taste of summer. Count on it.

I adapted this recipe from one printed in the newest issue of Bake from Scratch. Bake from Scratch is a newer publication, dedicated to baking culture and the recipes, bakeries, and movers and shakers that make our world a little bit sweeter. You may remember that I was featured in a previous issue as one of nine baking bloggers to follow in 2017 (!!!), and while I am incredibly honored to have been featured, I’m really just thrilled to have a seat at the table. Getting to bake and write and interact with all of you is more fun than all of the basketball games, cookbooks, Provencial summer homes that the world has to offer.

Keep this strawberry pretzel tart on your list of weekend plans and save a slice for me! Let me know if you’re reading or doing anything extra fun this weekend and take a peek at the links I shared with you! Happy weekend and cheers to you!

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

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Meyer Lemon Cheesecake

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Vegan Coconut Lime Ice Cream Cake 

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Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A simple, fast recipe that takes less than 30 minutes. A quick brown sugar butter and pretzel pie crust filled with a no bake cream cheese cheesecake type filling and topped with fresh strawberries or berries of your choice. Recipe adapted from Bake from Scratch Magazine. Perfect make ahead dessert idea. Thewoodandspoon.com

This strawberry pretzel tart has a sweet and salty pretzel crust, a no-bake cheesecake filling, and is topped with fresh strawberries.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Total Time: 30
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pretzel crust

  • 5 ounces (ends up being about 1-1/2 cups of crumbs) of pretzels
  • 1/4 cup (55 gm) brown sugar
  • Heaping 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup /1 stick (115 gm) of unsalted butter, melted

For the cheesecake filling

  • 18 ounce block (225 gm) of cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 3/4 cup (150 gm) sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup (240 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • 1 lb (450 gm) of strawberries, hulled and sliced

Instructions

To prepare the crust

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a food processor, whiz the pretzels, brown sugar, and salt until the pretzels are crumbs. Add the melted butter and pulse to combine. Alternatively, you can crush the pretzel and stir the other ingredients in to combine.
  3. Pat out the crumbs into the bottom and sides of a 10″ tart pan. Bake in the oven for 8-10 minutes until set. Allow to cool completely before using.

To prepare the cheesecake filling

  1. Beat the cream cheese, sugar, and vanilla on medium speed in the bowl of a stand mixer until smooth and without lumps. Scrape the sides of the bowl as needed.
  2. In a separate bowl, whip the heavy cream using a whisk or whisk attachment of a stand mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold half of the whipped cream into the cream cheese mixture. Once fairly integrated, add the remaining whipped cream and continue to fold until uniform. Take care not to overwork the mixture as this can cause it to lose its fluffiness. Spread the mixture out into the bottom of the cooled tart crust. Allow to chill in the fridge until ready to serve. Once ready to eat, arrange the sliced berries to decorate the top of the tart. Serve chilled.

Notes

  • Pretzel crust is best eaten within two days of preparation. It maintains its delicious flavor for several days but the crust can become soggy.

Adapted from: Bake From Scratch

Blood Orange Bundt Cake

Blood Orange Bundt Cake Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A vanilla and citrus scented cake made with blood orange zest and juice, this bundt cake is fluffy, moist, and an easy one bowl recipe what to make with blood oranges. The glaze is a simple blood orange juice icing that is pink and so fun to make! This makes a large bundt cake but you can adapt it to make it in round pans or even muffin tins. You could try this recipe in a tube pan with removable bottom as well. Find this winter citrus, festive cake on thewoodandspoon.com

There’s nothing like a few blood oranges and a shot of liquor to spruce up an otherwise ordinary bowl of flour and eggs- am I right? Ingredients like these take cakes from average to amazing, so I’m thrilled the share a treat like this blood orange bundt cake with you today!

Living in a fairly rural area of lower Alabama, I often have a hard time finding exotic ingredients at my grocery store. Just to be clear: I’m using the term ‘exotic” loosely here. I’m not talking ostrich eggs or black truffles or even something as basic as a tub of mascarpone cheese. In these parts, it’s a stretch some days to even get my hands on a gallon of organic milk or a bag pine nuts, okay? We’re a one grocery store town (two if you count Wal-Mart, three if you count that guy who sells watermelons and sweet potatoes out of the tailgate of his truck), so while I am a far cry from being a pioneer woman, I still have to get kinda creative with my ingredients sometimes. 

Blood Orange Bundt CakeBlood Orange Bundt Cake

Last fall, our grocery store randomly got in a shipment of leeks and I remember feeling like it was Christmas morning. Holding back tears of joy, I called a few girlfriends exclaiming, “They (sniff, sob)… have (gasp for air, more sobs)… LEEKS!” I’m pretty sure I bought three bunches of those little beauties, and Brett and I ate potato leek soup for like two weeks. Unfortunately, our plumbing hasn’t been the same since the leak incident of 2016. RIP.

Then there was the day they started carrying my favorite brand of kettle corn. When I spotted that beautiful lavender colored bag on the bottom shelf, you would’ve thought Charlie had found Mr.Wonka’s golden ticket. I dropped whatever off-brand bag of potato chips I had been considering and raced to the popcorn shelf for a closer inspection. I can’t remember, but I think I cried real tears and then bought up the shelf of popcorn like I was stocking a bomb shelter. Don’t you dare judge me for it.

Our little grocery store is small and humble, and to be honest, it can be really frustrating to not have immediate access to a lot of the ingredients that bigger stores probably carry (#firstworldproblems). But let me say this: the ladies at the checkout line know my children by name. My daughter is so obsessed with our store’s butcher that sometimes she will request a trip to the store just so “Aimee go see Willie, please mama?” I can walk to my grocery store in less than 15 minutes, drive there in less than 3, and even though it’s not much, I’d take my little hometown store situation over just about anything.

Blood Orange Bundt Cake

Recently while shopping, I spied some blood oranges in the produce department. I sang the “Hallelujah Chorus” and promptly tossed a bag in my cart. I must have kept those oranges in my fridge for nearly a week before I decided what was worthy of its fancy juice and zest, and I’m happy to say that this blood orange bundt cake is the product of those efforts in the kitchen.

A fluffy butter and egg filled batter, scented with vanilla bean and citrusy zest, this blood orange bundt cake is the best case scenario for any bit of prized produce hanging out in your fridge. This cake takes the juice and zest of quite a few blood oranges, so it is perfect for using up all of that wintertime citrus. To make the blood orange bundt cake, we start by combining a number of basic dry ingredients- flour, sugar, baking soda… you know the drill. Once well combined, we toss in a few chunks of butter and allow that to incorporate until it’s pea-sized crumbles. The blood orange juice, eggs, and zest are combined with a bit of orange liquor, and that wet mixture is added to the cake. Once whipped to a smooth and fluffy finish, the batter is poured into a large bundt cake pan and baked in the oven until golden and fragrant. 

Blood Orange Bundt CakeBlood Orange Bundt Cake

I decided to top this blood orange bundt cake with a simple glaze made of blood orange juice and powdered sugar. The blood oranges lend a rosy hue to the glaze, and while a bright pink frosted cake is rarely an elegant treat, I can promise that this cake is one all the grown-ups will write home about. It has a tender and moist crumb, an understated citrus kick, and just the right amount of sugar to make this cake perfect for breakfast or dessert. BONUS: If you, like me, live in a slightly rural area with limited access to special fruits like this, take heart! I have tried this cake with navel and mandarin oranges and I can vouch for both as substitutes. 

This blood orange bundt cake is a seasonal way to spruce up your baking game and I hope you’ll give it a try. Experimenting with new flavors, even ones that maybe aren’t so “exotic” like the citrus in this cake is an incredibly fun way to spend time in the kitchen. If you happen to spot a bag of blood oranges at the store this week, you should grab one and give this cake a try. Oh, and if you happen to be shopping at my local grocery store, you better get there quick before I buy up their stock of blood oranges. 

 

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Blood Orange Bundt Cake

Blood Orange Bundt Cake Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A vanilla and citrus scented cake made with blood orange zest and juice, this bundt cake is fluffy, moist, and an easy one bowl recipe what to make with blood oranges. The glaze is a simple blood orange juice icing that is pink and so fun to make! This makes a large bundt cake but you can adapt it to make it in round pans or even muffin tins. You could try this recipe in a tube pan with removable bottom as well. Find this winter citrus, festive cake on thewoodandspoon.com

This blood orange bundt cake is a sweet and citrus cake that is perfect to share with a crowd! Serve for breakfast or dessert.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 80
  • Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes
  • Category: Cakes
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake

  • 21/2 tablespoons blood orange zest
  • 1 cup blood orange juice (about 5 blood oranges, but will vary)
  • 21/2 teaspoons orange liquor
  • 5 eggs, room temperature
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste
  • 3 cups flour
  • 21/2 cups sugar
  • 11/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 11/4 teaspoons salt
  • 23/4 sticks of butter (11 ounces/22 tablespoons), room temperature

For the glaze

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 3 tablespoons blood orange juice (more, if desired)
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

To prepare the cake

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and liberally grease and flour a large 15 cup bundt cake pan.
  2. Stir together the eggs, vanilla, blood orange juice, zest, and liquor in a bowl or measuring cup and set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer, or a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt and stir on low until combined, about 30 seconds. Keeping the mixer on low, add the butter one tablespoon at a time and continue to beat until the mixture is uniform and in peas-sized crumbles.
  4. Increase the speed to medium (about 4 on a stand mixer) and slowly pour in the egg and juice mixture. Continue to beat until the batter is uniformly moistened, smooth and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, smooth the top, and bake in the preheated oven for about 1 hour, or until an inserted toothpick or cake tester comes out clean. Allow to cool on a cooling rack for about an hour and then carefully invert on the rack to continue cooling completely.

To prepare the glaze

  1. Combine all three ingredients until no lumps of sugar remain. Add more sugar to thicken glaze slightly and add small amounts of juice, milk, or water, to thin the glaze out. I prefer to keep mine rather thick so that it will thickly coat the sides of my cake. Once the cake is cooled completely, pour the glaze over top and allow it to drizzle down the sides. Store at room temperature for up to three days.

Notes

  • This recipe is intended to be prepared in a large, 15 cup bundt cake pan. Do not fill the pan more than 3/4 of the way full or it will overflow! Pour extra batter in a cupcake pan and bake little blood orange muffins.
  • Test the viscosity of your glaze this way: run a spatula or your whisk through the glaze. It should be just thick enough that the line you dragged through the glaze nearly disappears after about 10 counted seconds. Add more powdered sugar to thicken, or more juice to thin.

Recipe Adapted From: Jeff Mauro