Breakfast

Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins

Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins by the Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are healthy, whole grain muffins, sweetened naturally with golden raisins and topped with a simple streusel. The muffins are kept moist with oil and grated carrots and can be made ahead and frozen to be shared later. These better for you breakfast treats are the great way to stay on top of your diet in the new year! Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

I’m not one for New Year’s resolutions. The idea of a resolution always feels a little like a temporary fix, a band-aid, for needs that require long-term effort and solutions. In my experience, resolutions are typically nothing more than the onset of a 3-week fad diet and an onslaught of inner shame when I inevitably fail. There’s an unspoken expectation that I will eventually quit my resolution, even on January 1.

In the past, I’ve been consumed by who I’m not and the things I don’t have. The new year, a fresh start, a clean slate, has always been an escape route- the perfect opportunity for an unsteady leap towards the illusion of something that I think might make me more content. I’ve literally spent years of Januarys starving and straining and guilting myself into perfect misery. Into failure.

Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins by the Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are healthy, whole grain muffins, sweetened naturally with golden raisins and topped with a simple streusel. The muffins are kept moist with oil and grated carrots and can be made ahead and frozen to be shared later. These better for you breakfast treats are the great way to stay on top of your diet in the new year! Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

This year, I’m looking at resolutions a little differently. I’m still making goals, still setting the bar high for myself, but I want more. Instead of smaller thighs, I want more confidence. Instead of less debt, I want more financial freedom. And instead of fewer stress-induced grey hairs, I want MORE LIFE: More joy. Deeper relationships. Stronger skills. Increased hope and laughter and kindness to offer to the world.

January may be there perfect time to cut back, make changes, or switch gears, but this year I am motivated by the possibility of more. I’m not making alterations on my life because of the ugly things I see in it; I’m taking baby steps towards a joyful and abundant life that I know I should be living. If it takes me 30 more years to get there, I’m okay with that. I’m moving forward and towards more.

Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins by the Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are healthy, whole grain muffins, sweetened naturally with golden raisins and topped with a simple streusel. The muffins are kept moist with oil and grated carrots and can be made ahead and frozen to be shared later. These better for you breakfast treats are the great way to stay on top of your diet in the new year! Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Whole-Wheat Carrot Muffins

Maybe you’ve made a resolution to lose weight or bake a little healthier this year. Maybe, like me, you want more vegetables and sources of nutrients in your diet. These whole wheat carrot muffins- sweet, delicious, and simple to make- are the answer to those goals.

Making the Muffins

To make them, we start by mixing together the dry ingredients. Whole wheat flour and leavening are combined with warm winter spices. In a separate bowl, we stir together eggs, oil, and brown sugar for sweetness. The dry ingredients and the liquids are folded together before carrots and golden raisins are added to the mix. Muffin tins are filled to the brim with batter and topped with a simple golden streusel for an extra pop of sweet.

Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins by the Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are healthy, whole grain muffins, sweetened naturally with golden raisins and topped with a simple streusel. The muffins are kept moist with oil and grated carrots and can be made ahead and frozen to be shared later. These better for you breakfast treats are the great way to stay on top of your diet in the new year! Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These whole wheat carrot muffins are simple but flavorful, a feel good kind of food I don’t often showcase on this blog. This is the type of dish you don’t feel bad about preparing or sharing- the kind of food that gives you more.

Make these whole wheat carrot muffins this month and let me know what you think! No matter what your goals are this month, I hope you find yourself with more of all of the good things by the time February rolls around. I’m looking forward to hanging out with you guys this coming year, so, as always, thank you for making this space a home for me. Y’all are the best.

Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins by the Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are healthy, whole grain muffins, sweetened naturally with golden raisins and topped with a simple streusel. The muffins are kept moist with oil and grated carrots and can be made ahead and frozen to be shared later. These better for you breakfast treats are the great way to stay on top of your diet in the new year! Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these whole wheat carrot muffins, you should check out:

Peach Crumb Muffins

Hummingbird Muffins

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze

Brown Sugar Pound Cake with Blueberries and Brown Butter Crumble 

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake

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Whole Wheat Carrot Muffins

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

4.8 from 5 reviews

These whole wheat carrot muffins are a healthier breakfast option without sacrificing any flavor. Make them ahead and share with friends for a tasty treat!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 15

Ingredients

For the muffins:

  • 2 cups (260 gm) whole wheat flour
  • 11/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon ginger
  • ½ teaspoon allspice
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) canola or vegetable oil
  • 11/4 cup (250 gm) brown sugar, packed (see notes)
  • 1 cup (225 gm) full-fat Greek yogurt, at room temperature (see notes)
  • 11/2 cups (160 gm) grated carrots
  • 1 cup (150 gm) raisins

For the topping:

  • ¼ cup (50 gm) brown sugar, packed,
  • 11/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, at room temperature

Instructions

  1. Move a rack to the upper third of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees. Prepare a muffin tin with 12 liners.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and allspice. In a separate bowl, combine the eggs, oil, brown sugar, and yogurt.
  3. Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and fold just until almost combined. Add in the carrots and raisins and stir just until combined. Do not overmix.
  4. Divide the batter up between the muffin tins, filling until about 3/4 of the way full.
  5. In a small bowl, combine the brown sugar, all-purpose flour, and cinnamon for the topping. Use the back of a fork to cut in the butter until pea-sized clumps form. Sprinkle the mixture over the top of the muffins. Bake for 20 minutes or until a cake tester or toothpick inserted comes out barely clean. Be careful to not overbake!

Notes

  • You can reduce the sugar in muffins by ¼ cup for fewer calories, if desired. The additional sugar enhances the sweetness, but a single cup of sugar produces a satisfactory muffin as well. I prefer the recipe as is.
  • You can substitute buttermilk or sour cream for the full-fat Greek yogurt, but do not use a low-fat version of any of these options.

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Peppermint Bark Bread and a GIVEAWAY!

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

Y’all. I am in full throttle Christmas mode over here. The past few weeks have been a whirlwind of wrapping paper and Mariah Carey Christmas songs, and I’m so excited about it, I could squeal.

Last week we enjoyed our first (and maybe only) snow of the season. Aimee was unsure about the snow at first, but eventually came around. She made a snowman and ate the snow, and all in all, I’d say she enjoyed her first winter wonderland. George didn’t have a clue what was going on but was less than enthusiastic about snowballs. Is anyone surprised? It seems like the harder I try to get my kids excited about Christmas, the more annoyed they get with me. Case and point:

Peppermint Bark Brownies Mocha Cookies by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a coffee and chocolate lover's dream dessert! Soft and chewy chocolate crinkle cookies scented with espresso and made a little crunchy from the addition of sprinkling/ sanding sugar. This is a great cookie for cookie exchanges and holiday Christmas parties. Find the recipe and the how to for these baked good treats on thewoodandspoon.com
Have you ever seen kids be this savage to Santa? Poor guy.

After a weekend of Santa visits, snow flurries, and mugs of cocoa, we’ve pretty much hit all of the Christmas highlights. Even if the kids aren’t in the holiday spirit, I’m going to be the merriest little elf this side of the North Pole, okay? Basically, hide ya kids and hide ya wife, because we’re making everything Christmassy up in here.

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

Peppermint Bark Bread

You’ve already heard me go on about how much I love peppermint bark. Chocolate plus anything is a win, but the sweet addition of peppermint bits just makes it absolutely irresistible. In my opinion, everything is better with a little bit of peppermint bark, even if it is as simple as a loaf of bread. Thus I give to you my new favorite holiday breakfast treat, peppermint bark bread.

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

The recipe for this bread is adapted from my favorite cinnamon swirl bread. The dough is buttery and fluffy and goes splendidly with anything sweet. Here, a chocolate filling and chopped bits of peppermint bark bring the razzle dazzle to  my favorite dough to create a holiday bread that is as delicious as it is beautiful. This peppermint bark bread is perfect for snacking, gifting, or grinching all to yourself. You decide.

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

Check Out the New Toy!

I prepared this peppermint bark bread in my new kitchen BFF, the Wolf Gourmet Oven. Remember the Wolf Gourmet Blender that I used to make the most delicious peanut butter and chocolate cheesecake? Well, in similar fashion, this countertop oven knocked my socks off and I am tickled to jabber on about it today. In the past, we used our counter ovens to make toast or heat small plates of leftovers, but we never utilized it for any substantial work. This Wolf Gourmet oven is not your average bird, though. It is made for heavy duty, legitimate baking, and I was thrilled with the results I had in preparing this bread.

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

Making the Bread

The dough for this peppermint bark bread starts off like any other with yeast, flour, and sugar. We add an egg and some butter to the loose dough and beat away at it in a stand mixer until the dough becomes stretchy and soft. While I normally proof my doughs on the counter next to a warm oven, I was thrilled to find that my new counter oven had a proof setting! I let the dough rise quickly in the oven and then began to prepare the filling.

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

Chocolate, butter, and cocoa powder are melted together and then stirred with a sprinkling of confectioner’s sugar. The whole lot of it gets smeared on the rolled dough and dotted with bits of peppermint bark. Roll the dough into a log, cut it lengthwise into two pieces and twist them over one another, pinching the two ends together to form a wreath. Allow the loaf the rise just slightly while you preheat the oven.

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

Again, I used the Wolf Gourmet oven to bake this loaf and the results were fab. I found that my peppermint bark bread baked in the counter oven was consistent with loaves I baked in my traditional oven, and I am grateful for a second baking option in my home. This appliance is a terrific addition to my kitchen and I hope you will consider one for your own!

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!

A Giveaway!

Because Christmas is the time for giving, my friends at Wolf Gourmet want to share one of these beauties with you! For an entry to win, click over to my Facebook page here and give it a like! Afterwards, leave a comment on this page below telling me your favorite holiday baked good. One U.S. winner will be randomly selected on December 19th! Happy baking and love to you all!

Peppermint Bark Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon blog. This is a sweet yeast bread similar to babka filled with a semisweet chocolate filling and bits of chopped white chocolate peppermint bark. The bread is swirled and braided into a wreath and baked in a cast iron skillet. This bread is festive enough for dessert but able to be eaten as breakfast too. Find the tutorial for how to braid bread and a review of the wolf gourmet counter oven on thewoodandspoon.com Christmas holiday recipe!
As always, thank you for supporting brands that make Wood and Spoon Blog possible.

If you like this peppermint bark bread, you should check out:

Peppermint Bark Icebox Cake

Peppermint Bark Brownies

Mint Chocolate Sandwich Cookies

Mint Brownie Ice Cream Cake

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Peppermint Bark Bread

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

4.6 from 11 reviews

This is a braided holiday bread filled with chocolate and bits of peppermint bark!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 120
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 2 hours 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup (160 mL) whole milk, lukewarm
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • 21/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs, divided
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons (55 gm) unsalted butter, at room temperature

For the filling:

  • 4 ounces semisweet chocolate
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/3 cup (40 gm) powdered sugar
  • 4 ounces Williams-Sonoma Peppermint Bark

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, stir together the warm milk and half of the sugar. Sprinkle the yeast over top of the milk and allow the yeast to activate, about 5 minutes. The mixture should froth and foam slightly. You can stir it gently to make sure all the yeast has been moistened, but if the yeast does not foam, dump it out and start over. Once the yeast has been activated, stir 1/2 cup of the flour in to the milk mixture. Once combined, add the remaining sugar, 1 egg, and salt, and stir to combine. On low speed, add the remainder of the flour and beat to combine, scraping the sides of the bowl as needed. Once evenly combined, increase the speed to medium (I use speed number 4 on my Kitchen Aid stand mixer) and add the softened butter 1 tablespoon at a time. Scrape the sides of the bowl and then continue to beat on medium speed for an additional 4 minutes. The dough will be quite moist and sticky.
  2. Lightly grease a large bowl and place the dough inside, covering it tightly with a piece of plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rest in a warm spot in the kitchen until it has approximately doubled in size, about 1-1/2-2 hours.
  3. Once the bread has nearly risen, melt the chocolate, butter, and cocoa in a saucepan over low heat. Once smooth, stir in the powdered sugar until well combined. Set aside until the dough is ready. If it firms up beyond a spreadable consistency, gently melt it again.
  4. Once the dough has risen, roll it out into a 12”x18” rectangle on a lightly floured surface. Spread the chocolate filling evenly over the rectangle, leaving a 1” border around the perimeter of the dough. Sprinkle evenly with the peppermint bark bits.
  5. Starting with one of the long ends, roll the dough somewhat tightly into one long tube and pinch the ends of the dough to seal in the filling. Use a sharp knife to slice down the middle of the length of the dough, leaving one inch at the top uncut. You should end with two strands of rolled dough connected by a 1” chunk of dough at the top. This will serve as the starting point for your braid, so you want the dough to remain connected here. Turn the exposed innards of the dough roll to face upwards and then twist the dough, right over left, right over left, until the entire length of dough has been twisted into one long piece. Join the ends of the dough to make a ring, pinching the ends together slightly. Carefully transfer the ring of dough into a lightly greased 10” cast-iron skillet. Cover the skillet with a piece of plastic wrap and allow the dough to rest while you preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  6. Once the oven is preheated, stir the remaining egg with 1 tablespoon of water and brush a thin layer of the mixture over the surface of the dough. Bake in the preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, or until the dough is puffed and golden brown throughout. Allow to cool slightly prior to cutting and serving. Feel free to dust with powdered sugar once cooled.

Notes

In a pinch, you can substitute ¾ cup chocolate spread for the filling.

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Maple Bacon Scones

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

This is it, the eye of the proverbial hurricane. We are in the midst of those few short days sandwiched in between turkey feasts and Christmas morning- that time of year when the to-do lists are lengthy and daylight is fleeting. To help us survive, I’m sharing these maple bacon scones, a simple and comforting dish that we all can rally behind.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

An Update on Thanksgiving

Last week was basically a grotesque parade of meals and cocktails and leftover turkey sandwiches. Don’t get me wrong- I like to eat just as much as the next person, but at some point, my gullet (and the button on my blue jeans) just scream, “NO MORE!” We started the week with a few dinners out with friends, and on Thursday morning, we fulfilled our American duty by demolishing the annual Thanksgiving feast. We ate an array of biscuits and green beans and casseroles, and because Thanksgiving lunch is the meal that keeps on giving, we later enjoyed turkey and bacon sandwiches.

By Friday, I felt like I had eaten a baby or an entire bucket of KFC chicken. I felt like I had devoured three meals back to back at a Walt Disney World buffet and at any moment could burst in a disgusting explosion of gravy and cream of mushroom soup. My mother tells me this is a normal post-Thanksgiving feeling, but my Spanx would say otherwise.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

After Feasting, We Football

Following our two-day binge fest, we traveled to Auburn, AL on Saturday to watch the Iron Bowl. For anyone who doesn’t live in Alabama or who couldn’t give two craps about college football (raises hand), the Iron Bowl is an annual football game between the University of Alabama and Auburn University. Being married to a rabid Auburn fan means that I participate in the festivities by eating chicken wings in my tailgate chair, drinking Crown Royale and Sprite from a gas station cup, and cheering at the game.

While I am no more interested in football than I am, say, Nascar or an international chess match, I do enjoy attending with Brett because he loves it so much. Sometimes it’s fun to scream and clap and cheer like I know what I’m doing. Plus, someone has to be there to resuscitate Brett if he loses his mind on a poor call from the referee.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Maple Bacon Scones

So that brings us to today. Bloated, tired, and scratchy-throated, this girl is wiped out. I’m sticking with soup and salad for the foreseeable future, unless of course someone wants to bring me another turkey and bacon sandwich on some pumpkin bread, because that mess is delicious. But I digress. Before we dive head first into a powdered sugar cloud of cookies and cocoa and carols, let’s celebrate the last of this fall season with some warm and cozy maple bacon scones.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

With a tender crumb, crisp edges, and a delightfully sweet and salty flavor, these maple bacon scones are a dream. My husband always says that everything is made better with bacon, and when it comes to these scones, I couldn’t agree more. The recipe was adapted from a new favorite, these chocolate coffee almond scones, and I was delighted that the butter-based treat transitioned from sweet to savory so seamlessly. I made and froze several batches throughout the testing process, and for weeks these maple bacon scones were toasted for a delightful breakfast that tasted fresh from the oven.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Scones

To make these maple bacon scones, we start with the meats. Fry up some thick bacon of your choice until crisp. I prefer applewood smoked bacon. Save the grease for another day and chop up the rest for the scones. Combine the dry ingredients, flour, seasoning, and baking powder, in a large bowl. Next, cut in cold chunks of unsalted butter. Stir in the diced bacon before pouring in the heavy cream and maple syrup. Work quickly to combine the dough, but be sure to not overwork it. Pat it all out into a 1″ thick round and slice it into 8 wedges. Brush the whole thing with a little more heavy cream before baking in a hot preheated oven.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Fresh from the oven, these maple bacon scones are fragrant. Imagine the glorious smoke of bacon combined with the smell of homemade bread and maple syrup; it’s almost too good to describe. These maple bacon scones are crowd-pleasing, the kind of thing you’ll want to serve at breakfasts in the coming months. Give this recipe a try and let me know what you think! They’re certainly worth making room in your belly for.

If you like these maple bacon scones, you should check out:

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Apple Cake

Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches with Pepper Bacon and Cheddar

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Maple Bacon Scones

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 1 review

These maple bacon scones are a sweet and salty favorite to serve at breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 8

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ cup (113 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • 1 cup cooked, finely chopped crispy bacon
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) maple syrup
  • ¾ cup (180 mL) whipping cream, plus additional for brushing

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, pepper, and onion powder. Use a pastry cutter or the back of two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until pea-sized clumps are throughout. Stir in the bacon. Combine the maple syrup and the whipping cream in a separate bowl and then stir into the dry ingredients, just until evenly incorporated. If a lot of dry ingredients remain in the bottom of the bowl you can add an additional tablespoon of cream, but be sure to not add too much liquid.
  2. Pat the dough out in a ¾” thick circle and place the dough round on a parchment lined baking pan in the freezer to chill for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  3. Once the dough is chilled, cut the dough into 8 wedges but leave the circle of pieces together. Use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of whipping cream over the scones. Bake in the oven until golden brown around the edges of each scone, about 35 minutes.

Notes

Chilling the dough ensures the scones will rise well. You can skip this step but it isn’t recommended for best outcomes.

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Loosely adapted from King Arthur Flour

Pumpkin Yeast Bread

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

In America, we’re on the verge of Thanksgiving. In just two days, we will roll up our sleeves to stir and boil, grate and grease our way to a table filled with the faces of people we love (and love to irritate). While everyone has their own traditions, must-eat dishes, and turkey day activities, there are a few universal truths that should be closely followed to ensure the best possible holiday. I’ve arranged them in list form for your convenience.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

The Universal Truths of Thanksgiving:

Thanksgiving is not the time to diet.

This is well-pondered, sound advice coming from your friendly neighborhood dietitian. Am I suggesting that you should require 12 sticks of butter in your creamed corn? No. Do I think it would be wise to drink straight from the gravy boat? Sweet mercy, absolutely not. If you are established in a diet regimen already, I encourage you to stick as close as possible to the path of righteousness, but if not, just know that Thanksgiving is not the time to start cutting carbs. Your cabbage soup cleanse can wait until Friday.

Don’t be that guy.

Don’t be the guy who tells the taboo story at the dinner table. And don’t be the jerk who makes Nana cry. And certainly don’t make off-color comments or bring up touchy family subjects. Just don’t be a Thanksgiving turd, okay?

Show up on time.

There is a time to be fashionably late. For example, if it’s your birthday, you are expected to show up to your surprise party late. If you’re a Kardashian, you are welcome to walk the red carpet as late as you darn well please. But let me say this- if I spend 12+ hours basting and sweating over a giant bird in the oven, you had better make sure your sorry behind is there to help carve it. I will not wait for you to start dinner, and no one will feel sorry for you when all that’s left to eat is the congealed salad.

Be grateful.

How about we thank the crap out of this Thanksgiving? What if we opened our heart and poured sincere, intentional gratitude on everyone around the table? If saying thank you or expressing love is hard for you, consider Thanksgiving your invitation to be unabashedly and enthusiastically thankful about the good things in your life.

Two words: cornbread dressing.

Listen, I grew up in a Yankee household and have all the love in the world for the classic seasoned “stuffing.” But if 12 years in Alabama have taught me anything, it’s that cornbread dressing is the bomb.com, and if you’re not making it, you’re just plain sorry. My mother-in-law gave me a terrifically delicious recipe, and yes, I am starving just thinking about it.

Help the host.

I mean it. Text them right now and say, “What can I do to be helpful at the Thanksgiving meal?” Ask if you can pick up ice or bring a few extra bottles of wine. Offer to set the table or write out place cards. This post from Williams-Sonoma showcases a few other ways to be a great Thanksgiving dinner guest.

THAW. THE. TURKEY.

This will take longer than you think. If it’s not out of the freezer already, Godspeed, my friend.

Share a dessert!

Dessert is a great way to contribute a make-ahead dish to a Thanksgiving feast. Might I suggest a few of my favorites? How about chocolate chess pie, brown sugar cheesecake, caramel apple pie, or pumpkin cheesecake tartlets.

Bring a gift to share with your host.

Serving up a spectacle like Thanksgiving dinner requires a ton of time, money, and planning. Thank your generous host by bringing a happy parting gift that says, “YOU ROCK!” For a homerun gift, you should try…

PUMPKIN YEAST BREAD.

What better way to serve up leftover turkey and cranberry sauce than adorning it on a piece of fluffy, slightly sweet, and seasoned pumpkin yeast bread. This is the gift to beat. YA WELCOME.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

This pumpkin yeast bread is the perfect thing for the season. Honey, all-purpose flour and pumpkin puree are combined with a few other ingredients to make the fluffiest autumnal bread that your Thanksgiving leftovers have ever seen. Sturdy enough for thick slices of turkey, but soft enough for a spread of cinnamon butter, this pumpkin yeast bread is a diverse treat that practically begs to be made this time of year.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Bread

To make the pumpkin yeast bread, we start in the bowl of a stand mixer. First, dissolve some active dry yeast in some warm water. Next, add a bit of milk, oil, and honey, stirring to combine. Finally add the pumpkin puree. A single cup gets stirred into the wet ingredients and is followed up by all-purpose flour and the remaining dry ingredients. Knead the dough in your stand mixer (or by hand if you’re skilled like that!) and then allow it to rise in a warm spot in the kitchen.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

Shaping the Loaves

Once doubled in size, divide the dough in two and form into loaves. Check out this video on shaping loaves if you’re unfamiliar. Allow the dough to rise again, this time until the loaves dome just an inch over the top of your bread pan. Brush each loaf with an egg wash and sprinkle with tiny pepitas for some added pumpkin flair.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

These loaves bake up tall, fluffy, and outrageously delicious. Pumpkin yeast bread, while a far cry from your run-of-the-mill sandwich bread, is the delightfully familiar and cozy baked good you’ll want to share with your friends and family all season long. Give this recipe a try and have a terrific Thanksgiving holiday. I’m incredibly grateful for these pumpkin yeast bread loaves and YOU.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a fluffy, simple, sandwich yeast bread seasoned with cinnamon, pumpkin puree, and seeds. Perfect for the holidays, thanksgiving and christmas leftovers, this bread is excellent for toast and snacking and makes and excellent idea for hostess host gift. Find the recipe and more info on how to make bread without a bread machine maker on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this pumpkin yeast bread, be sure to check out:

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

Honey Oat Bread

Flaxseed Bread

Raisin Swirl Bread

Cinnamon Swirl Bread

Print

Pumpkin Yeast Bread

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

3 from 1 review

This recipe makes two loaves of fluffy, lightly sweetened and seasons pumpkin yeast bread, perfect for making sandwiches or cinnamon toast!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 165
  • Yield: 2

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (120 mL) warm (not hot) water
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¾ cup (180 mL) milk, room temperature (I use whole)
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) honey
  • 2 tablespoons oil (I use canola)
  • 1 cup (225 gm) pumpkin puree
  • 41/2-5 cups (595650 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 21/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ cup raw pepitas

Instructions

  1. Pour the warm water into the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle the yeast over top of it. Allow the yeast to dissolve, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the milk, honey, and oil. Add the pumpkin puree and stir to combine. Add two cups of flour, the salt, and the pumpkin pie spice to the wet ingredients and stir until well integrated. Add an additional 2-1/2 cups of flour and, using the dough hook, knead the bread on medium speed for about 5 minutes or until the bread starts to become stretchy. Add additional flour to the bowl during the kneading process to get the dough the right texture. You are looking for a wet dough that pulls away slightly from the sides of the bowl.
  2. Grease a large bowl and place the dough in it, covered with a piece of plastic wrap, to rise until doubled in size, about 1-1/2 hours. If the dough seems to have a hard time rising, move the bowl to a slightly warmer area of the kitchen. I like to let mine rise next to a warm oven.
  3. Once doubled in size, dump the dough out onto a floured surface and divide into two equal pieces. Gently pat each piece of dough into a loaf-pan shaped rectangle and fold the two long edges to meet in the center of the dough. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat. Fold the dough once more and gently form it into a loaf-shaped log. Place the dough into a greased loaf pan (8.5″ X 4.5″ X 2.75″) and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Allow each loaf to rise a second time for about 45 minutes until the dough has domed an inch above the top of the pan.
  4. In a small bowl, whisk the egg with 1 teaspoon of water. Brush a thin layer of this egg wash over top of each loaf and sprinkle with the pepitas. Place dough pans in the oven and immediately decrease the heat to 375 degrees. Bake for about 30 minutes or until the top of each loaf is golden brown and sounds a bit hollow when tapped. Cool in the pan on a cooling rack for ten minutes and then remove each loaf from the pan to continue cooling on their own. Once cooled completely, wrap in a bread bag or a large sheet of aluminum foil to keep fresh! Loaves can be frozen after baking if desired.

Notes

  • Beware of using a small pan. This recipe requires a large enough pan to accommodate the dough.
  • If your bread is not rising well, place loaves in a slightly warmer spot in your kitchen. I let my bread rise next to a warm oven.
  • Allow bread to cool completely prior to slicing.
  • Bread will keep on the counter for several days but will keep best in the refrigerator for up to 6-7 days. There’s no preservatives in this stuff so it won’t last as long as your supermarket bread- eat fast!
  • Wrapped securely in aluminum foil, bread will keep in a freezer for up to four months.

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Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

So this is it. This is 30. Yesterday was the turn of a new decade for me, and to commemorate my twenties and the ten birthdays that passed in that time, I am sharing with you some pumpkin pull-apart bread.

Turning 30

I’m probably supposed to be in mourning right now. You’re likely expecting me to talk about how great my twenties were or to complain about getting older. Maybe you’re anticipating a lengthy list of resolutions for the 10 years that follow today, or perhaps you’re just scrolling through all this nonsense so that you can read about the baked goods (no judgement, BTW.)

To be honest, 30 feels a whole lot like 29. A lot of joy, a hint stress, the occasional internal battle. I’m sure in the coming years, I’ll continue to yell at my kids and count my gray hairs a bit too often. There will be vacations and laughter and long phone calls with friends, moments of fresh revelation and desperation for answers to prayers.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

If 30 is different from 20 in any way, it is that I now know to expect the unexpected from life. And I’m okay with that uncertainty. I’ll relish in the highs and steady myself through the lows, knowing that that there are nuggets of gold and truth and hope to uncover in every season if I’m willing to smoke them out.  For me, 30 is the year of resting in the things that I know, a time for dusting off bits of myself that sat hidden on the proverbial shelf during the busyness and insecurity of my twenties. Maybe 30 will be the grand unveiling of a woman who is beautifully average but so content in the aesthetic of her own skin that she sparkles in a way that a 20-year-old simply cannot.

Maybe 30 is the new 20.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

I’m sharing this pumpkin pull-apart bread alongside a number of other bloggers  who are slinging pumpkin-filled recipes for the annual Virtual Pumpkin Party. You might remember last year’s pumpkin cake with burnt sugar frosting? Well, we’re back at it again, bigger and better than ever, because that’s what we do. We grow, we progress, we get infinitely cooler over time.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

This pumpkin pull-apart bread is fab. I adapted the recipe from my sweet potato cinnamon rolls which are a not-so-subtle nod to Ree’s famous buns. This pumpkin pull-apart bread is gooey and fragrant, the perfect comfort dish for the coming chilly seasons. If this bread was a sweater, it would be an oversized cable-knit turtle neck in a rosy shade of millennial pink. It’s fresh yet familiar all at the same time.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

How to Make Pull-Apart Bread

To make this pumpkin pull-apart bread, we start with a dough. Butter, milk, and sugar are warmed and sprinkled with yeast. The pumpkin is added next, along with of flour and spicy fall seasonings. While the original cinnamon rolls have a tender, moist dough, we add extra flour and kneading time to strengthen the pumpkin pull-apart bread dough. Once tacky and slightly stretchy, the dough is set aside to rise.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

Next comes the rolling and stacking of the dough. First, we cut a ton of equal-sized tiny squares and layer them in a loaf pan with a cinnamon sugar filling. Each piece of bread gets a coat of gooey sweetened butter filling so the pieces pull apart easily. The bread undergoes a second rise before it is baked and drizzled with a cream cheese glaze.

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pull-apart bread adapted from Pioneer Woman cinnamon rolls. A kneaded dough seasoned with fall spices and filled with a gooey cinnamon sugar filling, this pumpkin pull apart bread is a treat for fall breakfasts and brunch. This is a great Thanksgiving dessert as well. The yeast bread is baked and glazed with a tangy cream cheese glaze / frosting. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com for this virtual pumpkin party.

This pumpkin pull-apart bread should be the centerpiece of your upcoming brunches and holiday meals. Simple, comfortable flavors in the packaging of a unique and modern treat. Give this pumpkin pull-apart bread a try and I promise that you’ll fall in love. Be sure to check out the other recipes involved in the #virtualpumpkinparty! You’ll be seeing them scattered over various sites today, and they’re sure to knock your socks off. Many thanks to Sara for coordinating this fun little get together.

If you like this pumpkin pull-apart bread, you should check out:

Pumpkin Pecan Cake with Burnt Sugar Frosting

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Rolls

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

Orange Cardamom Cinnamon Rolls

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Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 1 review

This pumpkin pull-apart bread s sweetened with a cream cheese drizzle and is the perfect addition to fall and winter breakfasts and brunches.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 200
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 230

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • ½ cup (120 mL) whole milk
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • 21/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¾ cup (170 gm) pumpkin puree
  • 23/4 cups (360 gm) all-purpose flour, plus up to ¼ cup more if needed
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice

For the filling:

  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • ½ cup (100 gm) sugar
  • ½ cup (100 gm) brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg

For the icing:

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • ¾ cup powdered sugar
  • 12 teaspoons milk

Instructions

  1. Combine the milk, butter, and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and stir to combine until the butter has melted. Remove from heat to the bowl of a stand mixer (or a large bowl) and allow to cool to lukewarm. Once cooled, sprinkle the yeast over the top and allow it to dissolve, stirring occasionally as needed.
  2. Stir the pumpkin into the milk mixture and then add the remaining ingredients. Using a dough hook attachment (or your hands) knead the dough on medium speed for 5 minutes. The dough should be tacky but pull away from the sides of the bowl easily. Grease a large bowl, place the dough inside, and cover the bowl with a sheet of plastic wrap. Allow it to rise in a warm spot in the kitchen until doubled in size, about 1-1/2 hours.
  3. Grease a standard loaf pan (8.5” x 3.5”) and roll the dough out onto a well-floured surface into a 12”x 20” rectangle. Use the back of a fork to combine the butter, sugars, cinnamon and nutmeg into a creamy paste. Gently spread this over the entire sheet of dough.
  4. Using a pizza cutter or a sharp knife, cut the dough into 6- 12” long strips. Carefully make two stacks of dough (with three strips in each stack) and cut each stack into three equal pieces. You should end up with 18 equal-sized rectangles of dough. Layer all of the dough pieces in the pan, being careful not to squish to dough pieces down too much. Cover with a sheet of plastic wrap and allow to rise a second time and preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  5. Once the dough has risen about ½-1” above the top of the pan (about 30 minutes)s, place in the preheated oven and bake for about 30-35 minutes, or until the top has turned golden and set, even in the middle. You can gently touch some of the pieces of dough in the middle of the pan to ensure that it doesn’t still feel soft and mushy. Be sure that the dough is not under-baked in the center or your loaf will deflate when you remove it from the oven. Once baked, allow the loaf to cool in the pan on a cooling rack.
  6. Once almost all the way cooled, remove the loaf from the pan and prepare the icing. Beat the cream cheese and sugar in a large bowl with a hand mixer until smooth. Add just enough milk to make it loose enough to drizzle. Pour over the top of the loaf and serve! You can rewarm in the oven or microwave as well.

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Recipe adapted from Ree Drummond

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Our weekends deserve new life, don’t you think? I say we find a reason to get excited about the mornings again- something to pair with that strong cup of coffee and cream. These maple oatmeal biscuits are weekend warriors, making a delicious statement every time they emerge from the oven. If you’re as into making weekends great again as I am, let’s just agree to start here.

I can remember the days when weekends were saving grace. Monday and Tuesday would thunder into Friday with an onslaught of assignments and tests and premature gray hairs. Grades and deadlines loomed around every corner, so the primary sanctuary from the stress of school were those bookend days of the week. There’s not a teenager alive who doesn’t wait for the weekends with the same anticipation as they do the recess bell. It’s just science.Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Adulting

But in adulthood, Saturday and Sunday don’t care. It doesn’t matter that you worked hard all week or that you’re desperate for a break. The weekend isn’t impressed by what you accomplished Monday through Friday because there are groceries to buy, lawns to mow, and cars to clean. Adulthood takes hostage those few hours of weekend solace and ransoms them for nine bags of raked leaves, an unloaded dishwasher, and few hours worth of ironing. It’s savage.

You notice I haven’t even mentioned children yet. In the BC years (that’s the “before children” years), weekends might have at least included thirty extra minutes for a second cup of coffee. There would be time for blown-dry hair and a pre-dinner cocktail, maybe even an hour for catching up on your DVR. Let’s pour one out in remembrance, shall we?

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comWeekends with Kids

Weekends with kids are a different animal. There are bottles to warm and sippy cups to refill. Kids are not concerned about you reading the paper because kids want their Cheerios. They want to go to the park. Kids want to remove all of the plastic cups from the cupboard, litter them throughout the house, and then poop their pants while you’re in the middle of cleaning it all up.

My kids like to spend the weekends begging for junk food and television. Saturday is their favorite day to to skip naps and pee in their shoes. On the weekends, you’ll find my kids stealing car keys, hiding them in places Dad is sure to never find them. (Read: the toilet; see also: the trash can.)

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comI have this dream where I wake up on a Saturday after seven o’clock. Alas, my family is all awake, and they have been patiently waiting for me to wake up. They teeter into my room with a warm coffee and breakfast tray in tow, complete with warm maple oatmeal biscuits and extra butter to boot. (Remember, I said this was a dream.)

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

These maple oatmeal biscuits might save your weekend. They won’t change a fifteenth diaper or freshen up a gone-cold mug of coffee. They will, however, add some luster to the weekend. A one-bowl dish that freezes like magic and reheats like a dream, these maple oatmeal biscuits are the rising star of the weekend, and you need them in your life.

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Biscuits

We start by tossing together a few dry ingredients- flour, sugar, the usual suspects. Oats are next, which account for the extra fluffy, slightly nutty flavor that we wind up with once the maple oatmeal biscuits have baked. Ice cold butter is incorporated throughout before the dairy and a heavy-handed pour of maple syrup brings the dough together.

For the best success with these maple oatmeal biscuits, work quickly  to ensure that they enter the oven with chunks of chilled butter throughout. Handle the dough as little as possible so that they stay airy and fluffy, and use a floured cutter to trim out rounds, pressing straight down without any twist. I like to brush my biscuit tops with a little extra cream or butter for browning, but I think a simple painting of maple syrup would be perfectly sufficient here as well. You decide.

I think we should bake back the wonder into our weekends. Make these maple oatmeal biscuits as a means of celebrating the good Saturday and Sunday have to offer, and I promise you that things will start looking up. Happy week to you all!

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these maple oatmeal biscuits, you should check out:

Buttermilk Biscuits

Honey Nut Biscuits

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Peach Crumb Muffins

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Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 9 reviews

These maple oatmeal biscuits are soft, layered, Southern-style biscuits sweetened with maple syrup. Perfect for breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 12

Ingredients

For the biscuits:

  • 3 cups (390 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup (50 gm) brown sugar, packed
  • 21/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 cup (90 gm) old fashioned oats
  • 11 tablespoons (155 gm) butter, cold and diced into tablespoon-sized chunks
  • 1 cup (240 mL) milk (whole or 2%)
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) maple syrup

For topping:

  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 415 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper.
  2. Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Stir in the oats. Use a pastry cutter or the back of a fork to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it is reduced to pea-sized clumps.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the milk and maple syrup. Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients and butter and fold just until combined.
  4. Turn the mixture out onto a floured surface. Gently pat together, but be careful not to overwork. Pat out to 1” thickness and then fold in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and then repeat this patting and folding process. Repeat once more for a total of 3 sets of folds. Pat the dough out to 1” thickness and use a floured biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Gently pat together the remnants and cut out more biscuits.
  5. Combine the melted butter and remaining maple syrup together and brush over the tops of the biscuits. Bake in the preheated oven for about 12-15 minutes, or until the tops are golden brown.

Notes

  • Be sure to use very cold butter and milk. Butter and milk that is not cold enough can prevent your biscuits from rising well.
  • Do not overwork your dough at any phase of the preparation.
  • The folding of the dough helps to create flaky layers within the biscuit, but is not necessary if you don’t care about this.
  • For flakiest layers, use a sharp biscuit cutters and push straight down into the dough. Refrain from twisting the cutter as you insert it into the dough as this can cause the edges to seal off and keep from rising well.
  • To reheat biscuits, toast in a toaster oven until fragrant.

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Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones // Guide to Portland

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Friday, y’all! I hope that your week has been full of joy and that you’ve got a killer lineup for the weekend. Today I’m sharing some nutty, buttery, caffiene-enhanced treats to jolt your weekends to life- chocolate coffee almond scones. These treats were inspired by a recent jaunt to Oregon that I’m going to splurge about this morning, so bear with me as I take a salivating walk down memory lane.

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com
Views from The Allison Inn & Spa

A few weekends ago, Brett and I continued our whirlwind travel saga by flying with friends to Portland, Oregon. The trip had no distinct purpose, other than to soak our gullets with pinot noir and outrageously delicious food, and we were thrilled at the opportunity to relax in a new corner of the country. Our time was divided in two with the first half spent touring Newberg’s wine country and the second spent in downtown Portland. This split ended up being the perfect balance of relaxation and sight-seeing, both locations brimming with fun (and plenty of wine.)

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com
Friends sipping wines at Bergstrom; views from Soter Vineyards

First: Newberg

We began our trip in Newberg, the comfy cozy, deliciously boozy town just outside of Portland. With a lineup of wineries to visit, we opted for a hotel that would offer premium relaxation and rooms suitable for nursing any morning hangovers. The Allison Inn & Spa was the obvious choice given its proximity to vineyards and the luxurious offerings throughout the hotel. By day, we snacked on charcuterie and flights of wine, taking in the rolling landscape views offered from the wineries we toured, and by night, we dined at nearby restaurants, rehashing the day’s sites and excitement. On our final day before leaving for Portland, the girls visited the spa, and I’ll just say that it was more than acceptable. My body still feels good from those 90 minutes.

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com
Vineyard views

Next: Portland

Portland was a drastic change of scenery from the rural setting we were transitioning from. The city had a little big town feel as its expansive footprint was seemingly void of any giant skyscrapers, however there was no shortage of things to see, eat, and do. In planning for this portion of the trip, we were overwhelmed by the number of restaurant options that existed. HOW WERE WE SUPPOSED TO CHOOSE JUST ONE RESTAURANT PER MEAL? In the end, I was more than thrilled with the choices we made, and the food we enjoyed in Portland was some of the best I’ve ever had. (This is not an exaggeration. It was next level delish.)

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com
Photos of our crew at the Whiskey Library, and that ethereal moment where my lips touched Pok Pok chicken wings

Where We Stayed

The Nines Hotel hosted us for the second portion of the trip. The hotel was within walking distance of a number of places we wanted to shop, eat, and explore, and it also boasted a lobby fitted with a terrific restaurant and ample group hangout space- perfect for our crew of 8. The girls picked through the shopping scene while the men let out their inner boy at a nearby bar/arcade. Because we were there on a Saturday, we were able to snoop through the Portland Saturday Market, where we purchased scads of very necessary items that our husbands were more than happy to pack in their luggage (kidding). Our friends spent even more time eating at Bon Appetit’s “Feast Portland” event that was being held that weekend, but I opted to head to Powell’s Books where Joy Wilson (yes, the baker) was signing copies of her newest book (insert the squeals of this fangirl!!!)

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe and what to do while visiting wine country in Portland, Oregon by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com
Sunset at the rooftop bar of The Nines Hotel

Highlights

It’s hard to pinpoint one specific highlight of the trip. Certainly the views in Newberg were stunning, and there’s no doubt that the wine was first class. I’m still having dreams about the chicken wings at Pok Pok, and I’d fly back in a heartbeat for the kouign amann at St. Honore Boulangerie. Still, the trips we take with friends are cool just for the sake of spending time with that family in a new setting. You get to know people in a real away when stripped of the familiarity of home, and I’m really grateful for the chance to do that so often.

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

So now, let’s talk about these chocolate coffee almond scones. While dining at Jory for breakfast one morning, we enjoyed a coffee almond scone that was a delicious accompaniment to our morning brew and eggs. When I got home from Portland, I decided to recreate that treat so that those hours in the Pacific Northwest could live on in my Selma, Alabama kitchen. The end product that I came up with is nothing short of fab.

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Scones

To make these chocolate coffee almond scones, we start by mixing a few dry ingredients- flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder. Next comes the ice-cold butter which gets cut in quickly and carefully until large pea-sized clumps exist throughout the mixture. The chocolate chips and chopped almonds are added next, although you could certainly opt for walnuts, pecans, or even hazelnuts if you prefer. Finally, we douse the whole thing in an espresso cream, prepared by dissolving espresso powder or instant coffee into a smidge of dairy. Stir all of the batter just until combined and then cut out tiny rounds of dough.

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

For this recipe, we chill the dough briefly before baking which will help all of our little treats to rise well. Fresh from the oven, these chocolate coffee almond scones are bronzed, with a crisp, buttery, golden exterior covering the soft and almost cake-like interior. The coffee flavor here is subtle, giving way to melty chocolate morsels and nuggets of crunchy almonds that flavor each pastry throughout.

I love the simplicity of these treats, how a one-bowl recipe can yield such rich flavors and textures. These are the perfect addition to your weekend breakfast and brunch plans, although I’ve enjoyed them as an after-dinner treat as well. With so many ways to share these chocolate coffee almond scones with the people you love, I daresay these are a must.

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.comSee below for the lowdown on where we stayed, ate, and played in Portland. If you’re planning a trip to those parts anytime soon, please add these to your list. Happy baking and have a great weekend!

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are crisp and fluffy scones made with real butter and filled with espresso power, mini chocolate chips, and chopped almonds. These scones are made by cutting butter into the dry ingredients and are flavored with mocha and fresh nuts. Find the recipe and how to on www.thewoodandspoon.com

Where We Stayed In Oregon:

The Allison Inn & Spa

Luxurious accommodations in a country setting.

The Nines Hotel

Fun, spunky hotel in the heart of downtown Portland.

Where We Ate In Newberg:

Jory

Hotel dining unlike any I’ve ever experienced.

Thistle

A head to tail dining experience.

Red Hills Market

The perfect place to grab grub in between vineyard visits.

Where We Ate In Portland:

Coquine

James Beard Award winning spot with casual, fun fare.

Pok Pok

Southeast Asian food in a casual setting. Probably the best meal of our trip.

Maurice

Try this French bistro for their quaint lunches and yummy pastries.

Multnomah Whiskey Library

A mammoth collection of whiskeys in a library-esque setting.

Le Pigeon

French-inspired fare in a cozy atmosphere.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters

The flagship location for this national brand is in Portland!

Urban Farmer

Hotel dining at The Nines Hotel- a farm to table experience.

St. Honore Boulangerie

Delicate French pastries and coffee to-go.

Wineries We Visited in Newberg:

Hazelfern

Bergstrom

Soter

Scott Paul

If you like the chocolate coffee almond scones, you should check out:

Funfetti Scones

No-Churn Mocha Brownie Fudge Ice Cream

No-Churn Coffee Cookie Dough Ice Cream

Coconut Almond Chocolate Cookies 

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Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 2 reviews

Buttery with crisp edges and fluffy interior, these chocolate coffee almond scones are a simple, one-bowl treat that is bound to please!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 12

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup (180 mL) whipping cream, plus additional for brushing
  • 1 tablespoon espresso powder or instant coffee
  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • ½ cup (113 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • 1 cup (110 gm) chopped unsalted almonds
  • 1 cup (225 gm) mini chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. In a small container, stir the whipping cream and the espresso powder to combine and set aside in the fridge to keep cool.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, and sugar. Use a pastry cutter or the back of two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it becomes a coarse meal consistency with pea-sized clumps throughout. Stir in the almonds and chocolate chips. Add the espresso and cream mixture and stir into the dry ingredients, just until evenly incorporated. If a lot of dry ingredients remain in the bottom of the bowl you can add an additional tablespoon or two of cream, just barely enough to make it all come together into a dough.
  3. Pat the dough to ¾” thick and use a biscuit cutter to cut 2” round circles of dough for each scone. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Put the pan in the freezer to chill for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  4. Once the dough is chilled, use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of whipping cream over the top of the scones. Bake in the oven until golden brown around the edges of each scone, about 25 minutes.

Notes

  • Chilling the dough ensures the scones will rise well. You can skip this step but it isn’t recommended for best outcomes.

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Recipe barely adapted from King Arthur Flour

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. A take on the classic New Orleans dessert, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are fluffy yeast rolls inspired by the pioneer woman, filled with butter, cinnamon sugar, pecans, and sliced bananas, and topped with a homemade foster sauce. Caramelized sugar, dark rum, and a bit of butter are a simple way to fancy up your normal homemade breakfast buns. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Good morning and Happy Sunday, blog family! I hope you find yourself filled with loads of joy and coffee this morning, maybe even with a bit of spare time to whip up these bananas foster cinnamon rolls that I’m about to share with you. I’ve got the lineup of fun things to watch, read, and eat this week, so get comfy in your favorite chair and let’s chat!

2017 Restaurant City of the Year

Brett and I are planning a trip to Chicago for my birthday this year! Luckily, the city was just named restaurant city of the year by Bon Appetit Magazine. Read this article’s rundown on why Chicago is THE place to catch a meal and be sure to tell me all of your favorite spots there to check out!

Carpool Karaoke 

It’s no secret that I love carpool karaoke. James Corden is a wizard of musical comedy and I constantly find myself chuckling at his sketches. The folks at Apple must agree, because they have just launched an original series of carpool rides that you can watch exclusively on Apple Music. I fell in love with Will Smith’s episode and plan to catch up on the rest. Perhaps you should too?

Roasted Sugar

Did you know you could roast sugar?  Apparently it’s totally a thing, so excuse me while I put roasted sugar in everything from here on out. Stella Parks is a dessert genius and I cannot wait to try her method that she shares in this article. Roasted sugar cookies? Yep. Roasted sugar ice cream? You betcha. Roasted sugar everything from now until forever.

Taylor Swift 

Are we all still reeling from the new Taylor Swift single that was released last week? I’ve been a loyal fan of Tay for many years now, but I find myself puzzled, if not mildly disappointed, in the direction the album appears to be going. I’ll keep listening to 1989 and Red on repeat while I wait for the full album to be released, but I really do hope she surprises us with this one. I ran across this article that dishes on who Taylor’s past songs were written about. Nothing warms my heart like reminiscing on her former flames, and if that’s weird for an almost 30 year old to admit then I’m sorry, I’m not sorry.

Aimee’s 3rd Birthday

My Aimee girl’s 3rd birthday is next week (How? Why? Stop Growing!!). We aren’t having a major blowout this year, but I am looking forward celebrating with cake, ice cream, and a few other birthday surprises. If you’ve got any special days coming up soon, be sure to check out my blog archives for cake recipe inspiration. Also, this is my fave spot for candles and cake toppers. Ya welcome.

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. A take on the classic New Orleans dessert, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are fluffy yeast rolls inspired by the pioneer woman, filled with butter, cinnamon sugar, pecans, and sliced bananas, and topped with a homemade foster sauce. Caramelized sugar, dark rum, and a bit of butter are a simple way to fancy up your normal homemade breakfast buns. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These bananas foster cinnamon rolls were inspired by the classic New Orleans dessert. Last summer, Brett and I took a cooking class where I learned to make bananas foster for the first time, and I fell in love with the idea of including caramelized syrup and rum-soaked bananas in other baked goods. These bananas foster cinnamon rolls are the result of that dream.

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. A take on the classic New Orleans dessert, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are fluffy yeast rolls inspired by the pioneer woman, filled with butter, cinnamon sugar, pecans, and sliced bananas, and topped with a homemade foster sauce. Caramelized sugar, dark rum, and a bit of butter are a simple way to fancy up your normal homemade breakfast buns. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you’re unfamiliar with the process of making cinnamon rolls, you can check out my other two recipes here and here, or read up on Ree’s tidbits about making cinnamon rolls. She is The Godfather of cinnamon rolls so I highly recommend starting there. Once you have your dough made, the next steps are fairly straightforward.

Making the Cinnamon Rolls

First, roll out your dough into a long, slender rectangle. Lather up the dough with melted butter and then sprinkle on some brown sugar, cinnamon, and pecans. Next comes the bananas which should be sliced into thin, slivered coins; we want the bananas to roll easily with the dough so be sure not to leave any large chunks. Starting with one of the long ends, roll your dough tightly from end to end, like you’re working on a typewriter, and pinch the ends to seal in the filling. Slice equal-sized rolls and leave them to rise while the oven preheats. Bake the bananas foster cinnamon rolls until golden brown, and refrain from eating them all before you make the sauce. Trust me- you’re going to want to something to soak up that goodness with.

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. A take on the classic New Orleans dessert, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are fluffy yeast rolls inspired by the pioneer woman, filled with butter, cinnamon sugar, pecans, and sliced bananas, and topped with a homemade foster sauce. Caramelized sugar, dark rum, and a bit of butter are a simple way to fancy up your normal homemade breakfast buns. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Foster Glaze

To make the glaze, cook butter and sugar in a cast-iron skillet until the sugar has melted. Add the bananas and some spice, allowing the mixture to bubble and caramelize. Next comes the entirely optional (but oh-so-delicous) boozy part where we add in some rum. Add the liquor and remove the pan from the heat, tilting the skillet just slightly away from you. Using a long-handled lighter, carefully ignite the mixture and allow the alcohol to flame and burn off. (Sidenote: This step, if executed well, will make you look like a flambe guru, but no one wants to eat breakfast rolls that smell like burnt hair. Keep your bangs close and your eyebrows closer.) Allow your foster sauce to cool slightly before drizzling over top of the bananas foster cinnamon rolls.

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. A take on the classic New Orleans dessert, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are fluffy yeast rolls inspired by the pioneer woman, filled with butter, cinnamon sugar, pecans, and sliced bananas, and topped with a homemade foster sauce. Caramelized sugar, dark rum, and a bit of butter are a simple way to fancy up your normal homemade breakfast buns. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you’re into breakfast, brunch, and booze, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are for you. Include them in your breakfast lineup these coming weeks and let me know what you think.

Don’t forget to be voting regularly for the Saveur Blog Awards! You can check out the link here or in the sidebar of my blog homepage. You’ll find me and a few other friends in the “Best Baking and Sweets” category. As always, thank you for your love and support. Have a great week!

Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. A take on the classic New Orleans dessert, these bananas foster cinnamon rolls are fluffy yeast rolls inspired by the pioneer woman, filled with butter, cinnamon sugar, pecans, and sliced bananas, and topped with a homemade foster sauce. Caramelized sugar, dark rum, and a bit of butter are a simple way to fancy up your normal homemade breakfast buns. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these bananas foster cinnamon rolls, you should check out:

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Rolls 

Hazelnut Cinnamon Rolls

Orange Cardamom Rolls

Cinnamon Swirl Bread

BBC Popsicles (Bananas, Bailey’s and Coconut)

Banana Cream Pie with Oatmeal Cookie Crust

Banana, Chocolate, and Coconut Cream Pie

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Bananas Foster Cinnamon Rolls

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 2 reviews

These bananas foster cinnamon rolls are a breakfast take on the classic boozy dessert. Filled with cinnamon sugar, pecans, and bananas, these rolls are topped with a foster sauce that is to die for!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Yield: 16

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 2 cups (480 mL) milk (whole or 2%)
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick, 85 gm)) unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup (100 gm) granulated sugar
  • 21/4 teaspoons (1 package) active dry yeast
  • 41/2 cups (540 gm) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon

For the filling:

  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick, 55 gm) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 1/3 cup (70 gm) brown sugar
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ½ cup (60 gm) pecans, finely chopped
  • 2 bananas, sliced into very thin coins.

For the bananas foster glaze:

  • ½ cup (1 stick, 113 gm) unsalted butter, diced into tablespoon sized pieces
  • 1 cup (200 gm) brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 large banana, chopped into ½” chunks
  • ¼ (60 mL) cup gold rum
  • Chopped toasted pecans (if desired for sprinkling)

Instructions

To prepare the rolls

  • In a large pot, combine the milk, butter, and sugar over medium heat and allow to warm just before the milk is scalding. Remove from burner and allow to cool until luke warm. Add the yeast and allow to dissolve, about 2 minutes.
  • Add 3-1/2 cups of the flour to the milk mixture and stir to combine. Cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel and allow to rest and rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour. If your dough hasn’t doubled in size within that hour, place the dough in a slightly warmer spot of the kitchen.
  • Combine the remaining flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon and add to the risen dough. Stir to combine. At this point, you can refrigerate the dough overnight or roll out to use immediately. If you decide to save it, punch dough down into bowl if it over-rises.
  • Roll the dough out onto a lightly floured surface to a 10”x30″ rectangle. Spread the melted butter out evenly on the dough, leaving a 1/2 inch border around the sides. Combine the brown sugar, cinnamon, and pecans in a small bowl and sprinkle this out evenly on the dough. Cover the entire sheet of dough evenly with little banana slices.
  • With one of the long ends closest to you, begin to roll the dough away from you, pinching the dough together at the end to seal your roll. Trim off any shaggy ends (no more than 1 inch) Using a sharp knife, cut 1-1/2” slices of buns from your log of dough.
  • Arrange the buns in two 9” round pans or in casserole dishes with about ¾” separation between the buns. Cover the pans with plastic wrap and allow the buns to rise for 25-30 minutes, or until they are puffed and rounded. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Once the rolls are ready for the oven, bake until golden brown, about 30 minutes. Allow to cool on pan for 10-15 minutes and then top with glaze.

To prepare the glaze:

  1. Add the butter and brown sugar to a large cast iron or stainless steel skillet over medium-low heat. Stir in the pan until the butter has melted and the sugar has dissolved. Add the cinnamon and salt, stirring to combine. Add the diced bananas and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally and flipping the banana pieces as needed. Add the rum, stirring briefly to combine. Remove the pan from heat, tilt it slightly away from you, and using a long handle ignite the rum for the alcohol to burn off. If you’re not comfortable doing this safely, you can omit this step. When the flames have burned out, remove the banana pieces and pour the glaze evenly over the top of the cinnamon buns. Sprinkle with toasted pecans, if desired. Serve warm.

Notes

If desired, strain the banana pieces out of the glaze with a strainer. I prefer to keep them in!

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Recipe for the dough adapted from Ree Drummond

Raisin Swirl Bread

Raisin Swirl Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for 2 loaves of fluffy white bread swirled with cinnamon sugar and raisins. This bread makes delicious toast and is perfect for breakfast or casual dessert. You can freeze this bread to save for later and it is perfect for sharing. Learn to roll and shape this loaf of bread and read more about this delicious and simple yeast bread requiring egg and milk on thewoodandspoon.com

I think the first day of adulthood can be marked by the moment you realize that you are your mother. High school graduation, a promotion at work, the birth of a child, yes, but nothing makes me feel like a old lady more than admitting I want to be just like my mom.

Growing up, my mother and I weren’t always thick as thieves. She took the role of chauffer, chef, and maid, while I played the despondent, self-centered child with not even a lick of courtesy or common sense. As far as I was concerned, she was too strict, too loud, too all up in my business all the time, and I swore I’d do it better when I had kids of my own someday. And let’s all just laugh at that illusion, right?

Raisin Swirl Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for 2 loaves of fluffy white bread swirled with cinnamon sugar and raisins. This bread makes delicious toast and is perfect for breakfast or casual dessert. You can freeze this bread to save for later and it is perfect for sharing. Learn to roll and shape this loaf of bread and read more about this delicious and simple yeast bread requiring egg and milk on thewoodandspoon.com

At sixteen, it was easy for me to believe that my mom existed for little more than to ruin my life, but as I began to trudge through the muck of early adulthood, I discovered a few holes in that theory. Now, as I enter the early phases of what I pray will be many years of parenting, I think about my own children and how I can nurture them into becoming exceptional humans. I look at my mom, along with so many other beautiful women who have invested in my story, and I think, “What is the secret? How did she make it look so easy? How can I grow up to be more like her?”

“All that I am, or ever hope to be, I owe to my mother.” -Abraham Lincoln

The honest truth is that I don’t have a clue. If someone has already written a manual on adulting, they sure haven’t assigned me a copy yet. As far as I know, we’re all just supposed to feel our way through the dark and trust that someone else remembers to bring the flash light; just tell me when we arrive, okay? So in the meantime, until I figure it out being a grown up, this is my plan:

I will be too strict, too loud, too all up in my children’s business. I will discipline and ask the hard questions, even if it hurts. There will be fights, apologies, and more tears than worth counting, but I’ll do it because it’s my job. Because I love them. Because their future and soul and body is worth fighting for.

Raisin Swirl Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for 2 loaves of fluffy white bread swirled with cinnamon sugar and raisins. This bread makes delicious toast and is perfect for breakfast or casual dessert. You can freeze this bread to save for later and it is perfect for sharing. Learn to roll and shape this loaf of bread and read more about this delicious and simple yeast bread requiring egg and milk on thewoodandspoon.com

Thankfully, there’s room for so much joy too. We can play and eat ice cream sundaes and sing silly songs from “Mary Poppins” at the top of our lungs. Or we can share and forgive. We can settle into loving each other and learn to make room for other people at our table too. As their mother, I will protect and grow these babies with my sincerest efforts, but I will also rest in knowing that God will take care of the parts that I mess up.

That’s what my mother taught me to do.

Raisin Swirl Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for 2 loaves of fluffy white bread swirled with cinnamon sugar and raisins. This bread makes delicious toast and is perfect for breakfast or casual dessert. You can freeze this bread to save for later and it is perfect for sharing. Learn to roll and shape this loaf of bread and read more about this delicious and simple yeast bread requiring egg and milk on thewoodandspoon.com

Raisin Swirl Bread

Raisin swirl bread won’t make you a good parent. It’s not super healthy and doesn’t boast a hidden serving of fruits and vegetables. Buttered toast is a far cry from a superfood, but it is comfortable and necessary, so I think you’ll want to find these loaves gracing your table too.

The recipe for this raisin swirl bread was adapted from my favorite whole wheat sandwich bread. These loaves are oversized, fluffy, and pale, swirled with cinnamon and sugar and nuggets of dried fruit. Each slice of bread toasts up crisp and golden and tastes perfect with a schmear of butter. Even though my oldest baby typically prefers my cinnamon swirl bread, she also totally adores this raisin bread. The 2-year old endorses it, so surely it’s a win, right?

Making the Bread

First, make your dough for your raisin swirl bread. A little activated yeast and water mix with some milk, honey, egg, and oil. Add in some flour and salt and mix until well combined. Knead the dough until it becomes slightly stretchy and then allow it to rise. Once doubled in size, divide the dough in two and roll each half into a large rectangle of dough. Sprinkle with cinnamon, sugar, and a handful of raisins before rolling the loaves and leaving them to rise a second time.

Raisin Swirl Bread Recipe by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a recipe for 2 loaves of fluffy white bread swirled with cinnamon sugar and raisins. This bread makes delicious toast and is perfect for breakfast or casual dessert. You can freeze this bread to save for later and it is perfect for sharing. Learn to roll and shape this loaf of bread and read more about this delicious and simple yeast bread requiring egg and milk on thewoodandspoon.com

After baking, these loaves of raisin swirl bread boast a glossy, golden top and a soft and fluffy center. You can change up the swirl filling depending on your preferences, but somehow the old classic of cinnamon sugar and raisins just fits the bill. This raisin swirl bread is a treat the whole family can rally around unless, of course, your husband is terrified of dried fruit. **Clears throat, raises eyebrows, gives husband the stink eye**

Give this raisin swirl bread a try and let me know what you think. Maybe send the extra loaf to your mama or someone who took time to teach you the good lessons in life. Love them a little this week. AND DON’T FORGET TO VOTE FOR THE SAVEUR BLOG AWARDS! You can find yours truly as a nominee in the “Best Baking and Sweets” category. Vote as often as you’d like from now until September 8th by clicking here or on the link on my blog homepage. Cheers!

If you like the recipe for this raisin swirl bread, you should try:

Cinnamon Swirl Bread

Honey Oat Bread

Breakfast Danish

Flaxseed Bread

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Raisin Swirl Bread

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This recipe for raisin swirl bread makes two loaves of fluffy white bread swirled with cinnamon sugar and dotted with juicy raisins. 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 120
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 2 hours 40 minutes
  • Category: Bread

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 1 cup (240 mL) warm water
  • 3 teaspoons active dy yeast
  • 11/4 cup (300 mL) milk (I use 2%), room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons (30 mL) honey
  • 3 tablespoons light oil (canola, vegetable, or extra light olive oil)
  • 1 large egg
  • 6 cups (730 gm) of all-purpose flour
  • 11/2 teaspoons salt
 
For the filling:
  • 6 tablespoons (75 gm) sugar
  • 21/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup raisins

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, sprinkle yeast over the water and allow to dissolve, about 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the milk, honey, oil, and egg. Add 2 cups of the flour and the salt, stirring just until combined. Add the remaining flour and stir until the dough is a fairly uniform, shaggy dough.
  3. In a stand mixer with a dough hook attachment (or by hand, if preferred), knead dough on medium speed until dough is smooth and only slightly tacky, about 7-8 minutes. If the dough is too sticky, add up to 1/2 cup of additional flour.
  4. Spray a large bowl lightly with baking spray and place dough inside, covering tightly with a sheet of Saran wrap. Allow to rest in a warm spot for about 1-1/2 hours, or until dough has risen and is approximately double in size.
  5. Once risen, remove dough from bowl and separate into two equal pieces. Roll each sheet of dough on a lightly greased work surface into a 6”x20” rectangle. Whisk the egg with 2 teaspoons of water and brush this wash over the surface of each sheet of dough. Reserve the extra wash. 
  6. Combine the cinnamon, sugar, and flour in a small bowl and sprinkle the mixture evenly over the surface of each piece of dough. Sprinkle on the raisins as well.
  7. Starting at one of the narrow ends, roll the dough snug up the length of the long ends of the rectangle until you’re left with a tube-shaped roll of dough. Pinch the ends to seal the dough closed. Place each loaf roll into their own greased loaf pan (8.5″ X 4.5″ X 2.75″). Cover with Saran wrap and allow to rise again for about 45 minutes, or until the dough has risen one inch over the top of the pan. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  8. Once risen, brush a thin layer of wash over the tops of each loaf. Bake for about 35 minutes, or until loaves have turned golden and sound slightly hollow when tapped on the top.
  9. Allow to cool in pan for ten minutes and then remove to finish cooling on a cooling rack.

Notes

  • You can use a slightly large bread pan for this recipe as these loaves are massive! Beware of using a small pan. This recipe requires a large enough pan to accommodate the dough.
  • If your bread is not rising well, place loaves in a slightly warmer spot in your kitchen. I let my bread rise next to a warm oven.
  • Allow bread to cool completely prior to slicing.
  • Bread will keep on the counter for several days but will keep best in the refrigerator for up to 6-7 days. There’s no preservatives in this stuff so it won’t last as long as your supermarket bread- eat fast!
  • Wrapped securely in aluminum foil, bread will keep in a freezer for up to four months.

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Jelly Donuts and a SAVEUR Blog Awards Nomination (!!!)

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Friends, it is with tons of joy, some nervous sweating, and a dozen jelly donuts that I share with you THE. MOST. EXCITING. NEWS. No, Mom, I’m not pregnant, but… the Wood and Spoon blog is a finalist in the SAVEUR blog awards!

Saveur Blog Awards

I’m shocked, humbled, and so stinking thrilled about this opportunity. The SAVEUR blog awards, basically the Grammy’s of the food blogging world, is a celebration of writers, photographers, cooks, and bakers from all across the world who share their culinary perspectives on the interwebzz. I’m joined by several friends in the “Best Baking and Sweets” category and am looking forward to hanging out with the rest of the nominees at the awards ceremony that will be hosted in Charleston in early October. While winning this award would be so legit- I’m talking cooler than if Steve Carrell hand-delivered a Dundee award straight to my front door- I’m so honored to even have a seat at the table.

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Blogging as a Means

I started writing this blog because I wanted to author a cookbook. Blogging seemed like a practice field for writing and recipe development, perhaps even a chance at developing a readership. I thought that if I worked really hard I might eventually meet a publisher that would offer me a cookbook deal. It’d be done.

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

What I didn’t expect was how much I would fall in love with blogging. The fear I once had about writing (“What will people think? What if I suck? What if I don’t have time for this?) has been replaced with a ton of joy and a deep sense of gratitude. Instead of opposition, I was met with the open arms of readers and fellow bloggers who welcomed me to this home and gave me the room to make myself comfortable. It’s an incredible feeling to be apart of something that extends beyond my life and the four walls I live in. It’s an incredible feeling to belong here.

I still dream of writing books someday, but I’m content and fulfilled growing this little home we’ve made here too. The community I’ve found in this space is real and I’m so grateful for the friends and family who encouraged me to step into blogging. I’m starting to think that the sharing of food, both online and in real life, is one of the truest ways that I can love the people around me. So please keep hanging out here with me, okay? You guys make this awesome, and I’d like to stick around for a while.

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Jelly Donuts

Speaking of awesome, let’s snack on some jelly donuts. Cool?

These sparkly mounds of fluff are from a recipe compliments of the fine folks at SAVEUR magazine. The process is straightforward and simple, just a basic yeast donut filled with quality fruit filling and topped with sweet, sandy sugar.

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Donuts

To make them, we start by whipping up a sweet dough. Cream some butter and sugar in your stand mixer and add in some yeast, milk, and egg. Once that’s all combined, we toss in some flour and stir until a soft dough forms. Let it all rise for an hour or two until it’s double in size and ready for forming donuts.

Use a biscuit cutter to cut out some dough rounds and allow them to rise a second round. The recipe called for 3″ biscuit cutter, but I used a 2-1/2″ cutter with success. In the meantime, prepare your oil in a large pot over the stove or in a fryer, being sure to crosscheck the temperature with a thermometer. If your grease isn’t hot enough, the donuts will absorb a ton of oil and you’ll be left with jelly donuts that taste kinda like the county fair (which actually isn’t terrible, if we’re being honest). Cook the donuts about 2 minutes on each side, or until they’re lightly golden and puffed.

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Finishing the Donuts

Once out of the fryer, transfer the donuts to a big pan of sugar and take care not to burn yourself while you toss the whole lot of it together. Tossing the donuts while they’re fresh from the oil will matte the pastry in thick, glorious clouds of sweetness. Alternatively, you can allow them to cool first for a thinner layer of sugar. If you choose to use powdered sugar, this is the route I’d recommend. Once they’ve cooled a bit, use a piping bag fitted with a medium-sized round tip to fill your donuts with your favorite jelly. I chose strawberry (because duh) but raspberry, blueberry, or even cherry would find themselves right at home nestled in the center of these jelly donuts.

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Vote!

If you love this blog and are a fan of what we do here, I hope you’ll consider casting votes for me in the SAVEUR blog awards! You can vote as often as you like, and (BONUS!) the blog with the most votes will win the Reader’s Choice award! You can click here to vote. Be sure to check out all of the other nominees and show them love if you’re into what they’re doing.

Thank you all again for being rockstar supporters of this site. Happy Hump Day and cheers to you!

Jelly Donuts and a Saveur Blog Awards Nomination Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Find the recipe for these fluffy yeast doughnuts filled with fruity jam and covered with sugar. These are fried donuts that are tossed in cinnamon sugar, powdered sugar, or granulated sugar. Find the recipe and the how to for these stuffed pastries (also known as Berliners) on thewoodandspoon.com

Find the recipe for the jelly donuts right here!

If you like these jelly donuts, be sure to check out:

Breakfast Danish

Orange Cardamom Rolls

Peach Crumb Muffins

Funfetti Scones