Confections & Candies

Classic Tiramisu

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Friday, Y’all! I’m writing to you on what is actually Sunday because my fam jam and I are traveling to the most magical place on earth this weekend: Disney World. Yes, I fall into the small category of native Floridians who actually *love* Disney, and it is my biggest joy as a Mom to get to share that experience with my own kids. In lieu of a long, drawn-out post, I have a banging recipe and few favorite things to share with you this morning. Stay tuned for the classic tiramisu recipe and settle in for a some links to my late-winter faves!

A Favorite Read:
I love this article from Bon Appetit. As a food blogger, I get tons of questions about substitutions. Can I sub oil for butter here? Would brown sugar work in place of granulated? What if I don’t have baking soda?! Sometimes there are some simple substitutions that can be easily made, but often you just gotta stick with the recipe. This article from Bon Appetit speaks to those substitutions and why, if in doubt, you just need to follow the recipe. Enjoy the read!

A Favorite Beauty Find:
Anyone else feeling straight-up pasty this time of year? By the time February rolls around, I have been absent from the sun for, like, ever and am in desperate need of a freshening up. I don’t love to wear a ton of makeup, so this CC Cream (that means Color Correcting Cream!) is a perfect option for me. It’s a tinted moisturizer with SPF 35 and foundation properties that keep skin looking smooth and flawless. I wear just a few dabs of it under my blush and it has completely taken care of any postpartum redness and dark eye circles that I had before. Bonus: this is a clean(er) skincare line, so you can feel good about using it. Find the shade that works for you and give it a try!

A Favorite Thing to Wear:
Mom confession: I live in athletic clothes. If I happen upon a day that I actually have to wear a pair of pants that buttons, it’s truly hard times. Enter these fun rainbow sneakers. They’re the happiest little shoe I’ve ever worn and they totally help ease the transition from workout clothes to comfy casual. If I’m not wearing my Nikes or slippers, it’s these little guys 100%. This is one of my favorite shoes brands, so I hope you find something you love too!

A Favorite New Cookbook:
A sweet friend I’ve followed on social media for ages has just released a cookbook that is awe-inspiring and stunning. Julie Jones is a trained chef across the pond who is known for her intricate pies, tarts, and other baked goods. From following her, I know she is also a lovely human with a big heart. Her book reflects all of those qualities, and I am happy to add it to my collection. Check out the publication here!

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

A Favorite Classic Tiramisu:
Classic tiramisu is a recipe I never tire of. The creamy texture and hints of cocoa and espresso throughout play together to create a comforting, almost seductive recipe that is unlike any other. When I am craving a classic tiramisu, there is simply nothing else that will satisfy. It’s unique and 100% its own.

What I love more than anything about this Italian dessert is the ease with which it comes together and the fact that it is a make-ahead option fit for a crowd. This recipe is sufficient to serve up to 10 and you can prepare and store it in your fridge up to two days in advance. Does that make this classic tiramisu the perfect option for these end-of-winter dinner parties and candlelit gatherings? Yep. I recently made a couple of dishes of it for a Valentine’s Day gathering I had with friends and received rave reviews. (Disclaimer: my friends are not above stroking my ego, so if they lied and this dessert actually sucks you can blame them, okay?) For a small portion, feel free to halve this recipe. You can also prepare this is several individual dishes, just be sure to use smaller pieces of the ladyfingers to fit in whatever container you opt for. I love the idea of making this in tiny glass trifle dishes so that you can see the little layers before you dive in! Plus, everyone loves an individual dessert just for themselves. It definitely ups the fancy factor.

Give this classic tiramisu a try this weekend and let me know what you think! In the meantime, follow along on my Instagram to see BTS footage of the kids at Disney this weekend. If our last trip was any indication, this one is sure to be a hoot. Happy Friday and have a great weekend!

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this classic tiramisu you should try:

Cookie Butter Mousse
Tiramisu Cream Puffs
Tiramisu Cake
Caramelized Banana Pudding
Chocolate Budino

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Classic Tiramisu

Classic Tiramisu by Wood and Spoon. This Italian dessert is made up of Kahlua and coffee soaked store bought lady fingers, a fluffy whipped cream and mascarpone filling, and cocoa powder. This dessert serves a crowd, is make ahead, and a romantic offering for fancy group dinners. Learn how to make i from scratch on thewoodandspoon.com

This classic tiramisu features Kahlua and coffee soaked ladyfingers, a whipped mascarpone filling, and loads of chocolate flavor. 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Total Time: 60
  • Yield: 9 Servings 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup warm espresso or strong-brewed coffee
  • 2 tablespoons Kahlua or rum/coffee liquor
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 16 ounces mascarpone cheese
  • 11/2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • 24+ ladyfingers (I used about 28 in my dish but will differ depending on what size you choose. Hard or soft Cookies is just fine !)

Instructions

  1. Combine the espresso and kahlua in a small bowl. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks and sugar together until thickened and pale, about 4 minutes. When a beater or spatula dipped into the mixture is removed it should gradually pour off in a thin, viscous ribbon. Add the mascarpone and beat on low till combined. Set aside. In a separate bowl, beat the heavy whipping cream and vanilla on medium speed to stiff peaks. Fold the whipped cream into the egg yolk mixture until smooth and fluffy, being careful not to overwork. Set it aside.
  3. When you’re ready to assemble the tiramisu, dust the bottom of your serving dish with a layer of cocoa powder, about 1-1/2 teaspoons. Working quickly and carefully, dip your lady fingers into the coffee kahlua mixture and arrange them in a single layer in the bottom of your dusted dish. You want to fill in any larger holes but don’t worry about breaking up your ladyfingers to squeeze them into tiny holes. Spread half of the cream mixture on top of the lady fingers and dust the cream with another layer of cocoa powder. Repeat your process with another layer of ladyfingers, cream, and cocoa powder. Allow to set up in the fridge for at least an hour before serving. Alternatively, you can prepare this up to a day or two in advance, keeping covered and stored in the fridge.

Notes

  1. If you don’t have espresso, you can brew EXTRA STRONG coffee or stir some espresso powder into your warm coffee.
  2. Soft ladyfingers will be quick to fall apart in the coffee mixture, so work quickly! If you’re into a strong coffee flavor, you can also brush the tops of the ladyfingers with the coffee mixture after they’re been placed in the pan. 
  3. Using raw eggs totally freaks people out- I get it. Opt for fresh farm eggs or pasteurized to be on the safe side.

Caramelized Banana Pudding

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Hold the phone, it’s banana pudding. Caramelized banana pudding, to be precise. The recipe is as delicious and comforting as it sounds, and it’s being served up with a few Friday favorites to put your mind on weekend mode. If you need some mindless reading and a seriously killer Southern dessert recipe, you’re in the right spot!

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Peanut Butter and… Mayonnaise??

Okay, you know I’m all for Southern food, even the classic cult favorites that feel a little odd or out of place in my kitchen. But a peanut butter & mayonnaise sandwich? We may have taken it too far. I love the polarizing food debates (Coke or Pepsi? Dressing or Stuffing? Is Spam really a food?) , but IMO this one just needs no debate. Decide for yourself with a look at this article from Food52.

Shoes for Your Sister and Grandma

I traveled to Orlando last weekend for my sister’s high school graduation. In a comical turn of events, we discovered that my Mimi was wearing shoes to the grad party almost identical to my sister’s. Could it be that there is a sandal that knows no generational borders? In case you’re interested, I found some similar cute ones here and a loftier, more-refined option here. Oh, and by the way, it turns out my Pops has the same New Balance sneakers as my husband… this was less funny and altogether terrifying to me.

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Kolaches for All

I’ve been seeing various forms of kolaches (the classic Czech pastry) popping up all over the internet. Turns out I’m not the only one. The humans at Bon Appetit spent a couple of days driving nearly 300 miles to try 20 varieties of this European treat, and I’m more than thrilled to pick up a few recipe ideas here. Anyone want to see some kolaches on this site?

My Post-Baby Bounce-back Inspiration

I’m in no rush to get this baby out, but I am more than eager to get my hands on some non-maternity wear. At some point in time during this pregnancy, my favorite stores started selling clothes that might as well have been made for my body type. Like all of the wide-leg, loose-fitting pants we’re seeing everywhere? I’m here for it. Check out my favorites from Madewell here… I especially have my eye on that little tie-waist striped number.

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Homemade Rocket Pops

Food & Wine broke down the ins and outs of the store-bought summertime favorite popsicles. Their recipe uses whole fruit and can be adapted to include different herbs and unique produce. This recipe may be the one dessert that Moms and kids will rally behind this summer.

My New Skincare Curiosity

A few months ago, I told you about my slow tiptoe into better-for-you skincare products. In an effort to nail down something that was accessible and reasonably priced, I decided to try out a few new products from Supergoop! A few of my girlfriends have been ranting about them for months, so I figured they couldn’t be terrible. Most intriguing? A dry shampoo with SPF that you can sprinkle in your hairline before a day in the sun, a mineral face powder with SPF that bronzes as it protects, and vitamin-containing serum chock-full of sun guard. Give a peek and let me know if you’ve had luck with any of their other products!

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Caramelized Banana Pudding

My friends at Kitchn asked me to work on the ultimate Southern banana pudding recipe for their site. As a fairly new transplant to the South, I hardly felt qualified to be the judge of this kind of thing, but I was happy to take a stab at it anyways. Along the way, I learned more about banana pudding than I thought I needed to know and was excited to make an attempt at a recipe I’ve wanted to formulate for some time: caramelized banana pudding.

There’s an excellent BBQ restaurant close to our home that serves caramelized banana pudding. Unlike my husband, I’m not really a pudding kind of gal, but THIS banana pudding is really worth every calorie. After trying their rendition of caramelized banana pudding, I  decided to attempt a homemade version, and the outcome of that attempt is what I’m so excited to share with you today.

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

The pudding itself is pretty classic in nature. This is an egg and flour thickened pudding that is cooked over the stove until thick and creamy. Layered in between are vanilla wafer cookie crumbs and bananas that have been cooked barely in butter, brown sugar, and cinnamon. There’s literally no wrong way to make this caramelized banana pudding. With ingredients so decadent, it’s bound to be a homerun.

I like to serve this dessert in individual mason or weck jars, but you can also layer it in a 2-quart baking dish. Either way, the recipe will yield about 8 servings. You can expect a cool and creamy treat with bits of crunch throughout and loads of warm flavors that you normally don’t get in a classic banana pudding. This is definitely the highbrow treat your summer Southern dinners have been looking for, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I have. Happy Friday to you all and happy baking!

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this caramelized banana pudding you should check out:

Poached Pear Trifles

Cookie Butter Pretzel Mousse

Banana Cream Pie Cake

Banana Coconut Chocolate Cream Pie

Banana Cream Pie with Oatmeal Cookie Crust

 

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Caramelized Banana Pudding

Caramelized Banana Pudding by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a traditional Southern style banana pudding dessert made with vanilla wafers, whipped cream, and caramelized bananas. The cinnamon-scented syrup of the bananas adds great flavors and makes for a fun alternative to banana pudding. Serve these in whole containers or miniature individual jars. Learn more about this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

This caramelized banana pudding is a take on the classic southern recipe. It features a custard-based pudding, whipped cream, and cinnamon-spiced caramelized banana!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 8 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pudding:

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 3/4 cups whole milk
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 48 vanilla wafers (about 6 ounces), coarsely crumbled (2 2/3 cups), plus more for garnish
  • Whipped cream

For the caramelized bananas:

  • ½  cup (113 gm) unsalted butter
  • ½ cup (100 gm) brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 5 bananas sliced into ¼” slices

Instructions

To prepare the pudding:

  1. Whisk the sugar, flour, and salt together in a medium saucepan. Gradually whisk in the milk until combined, then place the pan over medium heat. Heat the milk mixture, stirring regularly, until thickened to a creamy salad dressing consistency and gently bubbling, 8 to 12 minutes. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes more. Place the egg yolks in a medium bowl. While whisking the yolks vigorously, slowly drizzle in the milk mixture. Once combined, pour the mixture back into the saucepan and place back over medium heat. It will be pale yellow, and just barely thicker than heavy cream consistency. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes more. Remove from the heat. Stir in the vanilla and butter until melted and combined. At this point, the mixture will be back to that creamy salad dressing consistency (think: runny ranch) and just a bit more saturated yellow in color.
  2. Sprinkle half of the crumbled vanilla wafers into a 1 1/2- or 2-quart baking dish, or the bottom of 8 (6-ounce) jars. Place half of the banana mixture over the crumbled wafers. Dollop half of the warm pudding over the bananas, or fill each jar to its halfway mark with half of the pudding.
  3. Repeat layering. Repeat the layering process once more with the remaining wafers, bananas, and pudding. Cover the baking dish or each jar with a sheet of plastic wrap (press it directly onto the pudding if you don’t want a skin to form). Refrigerate until chilled, at least 2 hours. Top with whipped cream or meringue, and more crumbled cookies, if desired.
  4. To prepare the caramelized bananas:
  5. Combine the butter, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a frying pan over medium heat to melt and combine. Once melted, add the sliced bananas in a single layer in the pan and lower the heat to medium-low. Cook on each side for 1 minute and then remove the pan from heat. Allow to cool slightly before layering in with the pudding.

Eleven Madison Park Granola // Guide to New York City

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

I’ve been dying to tell you all about our trip to NYC. My absolute favorite thing in the whole wide world is to eat my way through a new city, and while this wasn’t my first rodeo in The Big Apple, I certainly took in some sights (and bites!) that y’all need to know about. Before we dive into the who, what, and where, let’s first take a look at the granola, as in, the only granola you’ll ever need for the rest of your life.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

While in NYC, we dined at Eleven Madison Park (more on that later) and were sent home with our own individual jars of granola. Now, you guys know me. I like butter and chocolate and lots of sugar. I like fluffy cakes and drippy ice cream cones; granola really isn’t on my radar. But THIS granola… this was no ordinary granola. This is actually the best granola of my life.

I realized quickly that the tiny jar they sent us home with wouldn’t last long, and if I was going to make it last forever I’d have to figure out the recipe. Lucky for me, the kind folks at the New York Times had already nosed around about the how-to, and Daniel Humm, executive chef at EMP, had already shared his base granola recipe. With a few ingredient tweaks and modifications, I landed a granola recipe to share with you all that will from here out be known as THE GRANOLA. All others are dead to me.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

The recipe for this granola is probably the easiest one I’ve ever shared on my site. We’re literally going to dump a bunch of dry ingredients into a bowl and then dump some wet ingredients on top before baking it. That’s it. The dominant flavor in this granola is the coconut flakes which lend a warm and toasty crunch to the mixture. Hazelnuts follow suit and show off their delicious flavor in cozy chunks that are scattered throughout the granola. The secret star of the show is the cacao nibs which provide just enough savory and smoke to offset all the sweet happening here. Rolled oats, golden raisins, and maple syrup round out the flavor profile, and, oh, it is a sweet flavor profile.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

This Eleven Madison Park granola needs no toppings. It needs no milk, no yogurt, no janky açaí bowl to carry it; all it requires is a welcoming hand and an open mouth. It’s crunchy, sweet and salty, and has ridiculous depth of flavor. Follow the instructions and you’ll be sure to experience the same level of deliciousness in your own home. Keep in mind that the ingredients make a difference here. Invest in thin rolled oats (I bought mine from the bulk section at Whole Foods) and quality coconut chips for the biggest impact.

If you haven’t left your computers already to make your own Eleven Madison Park granola, let’s talk about New York! This is your official baking blogger, fancy dinner-loving, pampered prego lady guide to NYC. Leh-go!

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Where We Stayed

We stayed at 1 Hotel Central Park. This whole trip, by the way, was thunk up by my favorite husband and his BFF who decided to plan the trip for me and my BFF. They picked the hotel, booked a few reservations, and surprised us Christmas morning. While 1 Hotel maybe wouldn’t have been the hotel I would have chosen, I am so glad we ended up there. This boutique hotel is situated on the edge of Central Park and is within walking distance to a few great spots and a subway station. Uniquely appointed in a vibe I would call “Nature Meets Industrial,” the iron-clad hotel sports an exposed pipes and beams look that is softened with rustic wood, an abundance of plants and greenery, and warm, neutral fabrics galore. We stayed in a City King, and while the room was small, it offered a thoughtful details and unique features that added a ton of WOW factor. A few perks to expect with this hotel include free fresh fruit from the farmer’s market every morning, a delicious hotel restaurant on the bottom level, and a street location that is relatively quiet by NYC standards.

Would I stay at 1 Hotel Central Park again? Absolutely. Would I recommend this hotel if you’re looking to capture a more touristy side of New York? Maybe not. You might find yourself better situated closer to Times Square and the Midtown trains for that kind of vibe, but that’s just my opinion. My girlfriend and I decided we’d love to check out The Greenwich Hotel in the future. With excellent restaurants nearby and a decidedly chic urban vibe, that hotel is definitely going to stay on my list.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

What We Ate

What we didn’t eat might be the shorter list. Since I’ve visited New York several times in the past couple of years, I’m going to list out a few of those options below as well. Keep in mind that the food scene is ever-evolving in NYC, so if you happen to see this list in, say, 2024, maybe do your research and make sure it’s still the best recommendation. Cool?

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

Bakeries

Dominique Ansel Bakery

A James Beard Award-winning pastry chef’s flagship bakery. Everyone loves the Cronuts, but I’d recommend the DKA (Dominique Kouign Amann).

Mah-Ze-Dahr

Chef Umber Ahmad runs this newer hotspot and is up for a James Beard Award this year! I got to meet and speak with her during my visit there and was delighted to taste test some of the most delicious pastry bites I had in the Big Apple. My favorite bite there was the banana bread, but weekend crowds wait for a chance at the giant cinnamon rolls.

Milk Bar

Pastry genius Christina Tosi is known for her playful takes on nostalgic flavors. I’d recommend getting the Cereal Milk soft serve and a copy of her book to-go.

Breads Bakery

Just get the chocolate babka, okay?

Supermoon Bakery

I was promised an “Instagrammable” bakery but received so much more! Flaky stuffed croissants (I loved the PB&J) were among my favorite things I tried here.

Levain Bakery

Pro tip: Stop here on your last day and pick up a dozen cookies to bring home with you. They freeze like a dream and are worth every calorie penny.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

Upscale Dining

Daniel

This Michelin Star restaurant from Daniel Boulud was a highly anticipated portion of our trip. While the price tag for this meal made me sweat a little, the service was superb and the food was excellent. I recommend dining in the bar lounge.

Eleven Madison Park

Dining at EMP has long been on my bucket list, and this meal delivered on all levels. Every bite was delicious, inventive, and stunning to look at. The service was precise and thorough without being the least bit stuffy or pretentious. A highlight of the meal was getting a mini tour of the kitchen. We requested this at the beginning of our meal and after we finished eating, one of the staff members brought us to the back. They treated us to a taste-testing game and a brief walk-through of the prep areas. Eating at EMP was, without question, the very most enjoyable portion of our trip, and I’d highly recommend to anyone with a taste for an incredible dining experience. For reference, we enjoyed the 4-course lunch menu in the bar area.

Gramercy Tavern

A New York staple, Gramercy Tavern has long been one of my favorite spots in the city. You’ll find cozy, seasonal bites and warm service all year round. I prefer to eat in the bar- it’s beautiful!

Scarpetta

Someone told me to check out the spaghetti at this Scott Conant restaurant. I was hesitant to order something so basic, but it blew my mind. I also recommend the San Remo cocktail which, to this day, is my favorite cocktail of all time.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

Casual Dining

Uncle Boon’s

Quirky Thai food in a cozy setting. Expect intense flavors and HEAT.

The Spotted Pig

BURGERS AND FRIES. That is all.

Momofuku Noodle Bar

This is the Momofuku franchise’s most casual spot. We saddled up at the bar for big noodle bowls but stayed for the fried chicken.

Pizza Loves Emily

Would you believe that we came here for… the burger?!? We ordered a burger, the Brussels sprouts salad, the loaded fries, and the spicy pizza with the honey drizzled on top. Do the same and you won’t regret it.

Juliana’s Pizza

Owned by the same folks that started the cult favorite Grimaldi’s, Juliana’s in Brooklyn offers the same perfect slices with slightly less wait.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

Bars

The Aviary

An inventive cocktail experience.

Death & Co.

A self-proclaimed “cocktail institution” with no-fail beverages in a speakeasy-style setting.

Mother’s Ruin

We visited this bar during the wait for our table at Uncle Boon’s and I wish I could have stayed all night.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.comEleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

What We Did

I’ve done the touristy thing in NYC more times that I can count. We specifically avoided the host of available tourist options on this most recent trip, however, if you’re looking for an out-of-the-box historical option for your trip, please check out the Tenement Museum! I was dying to go and couldn’t reserve a tour at the right time, but this little blip on the Manhattan museum scene offers an inside look at American immigrant life. If you’re looking for a fluffy, pampered NYC experience, check out the things we did below!

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Makeovers at Saks Fifth Avenue

We treated ourselves to makeup consultations before dinner on our theatre night. They’re totally free and you can book a consult at the link above!

Workout Class at Pure Barre or Soul Cycle

If you live in a rural area (raises hand!) you’ll want to check out the big-city workout offerings. I visited a Pure Barre studio and my friend did Soul Cycle. Both were excellent! I recommend booking in advance.

FaceGym

“It’s not a facial. It’s a workout.” This is the slogan of FaceGym, the studio offering exercise training-inspired facial treatments now in NYC. Expect muscle manipulations, hydrating serums, and high-tech lasers and infusions.

Union Square Market

We tooled around the market to check out veggies, dried flowers, and even small-batch liquors. Highly recommend if you’re in the area!

Shopping in Greenwich Village

Check out the boutique offerings in the village for quirky gifts and fun take-homes.

Theatre

If you go to New York without seeing a show, did you really go to New York? We saw Hamilton for what will probably be my final time, but there are new shows popping up all the time! I’m dying to see Mean Girls and Ain’t Too Proud.

Walked the Brooklyn Bridge

If the weather is right, take time to walk (or bike!) the bridge. We walked to our Brooklyn dinner destination and took the F train home.

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

 

What I’ll Check Out Next Time

Via Carota

Buvette

Bar Sardine

I Sodi

Frenchette

Ugly Baby

Estela

Lilia

NoMad Bar

 

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Eleven Madison Park Granola and Our Trip to NYC

Eleven Madison Park Granola Copycat Recipe and what to do in New York city foodie guide by Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a healthy Rolled oat based recipe from NYC famous restaurant. Filled with chopped hazelnuts, cacao nibs, golden raisins, and flaked coconut chips, this is a sweet and salty delicious and easy granola. Tossed in a brown sugar, maple syrup, and olive oil based glaze. It keeps fresh and makes a wonderful food gift to share. Find the recipe and step by step how to on thewoodandspoon.com

This granola, adapted from Eleven Madison Park’s recipe, features a coconut base and loads of flavor from hazelnuts and cacao nibs.

  • Author: Kate Wood Adapted from Daniel Humm
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 6 Cups 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

  • 23/4 cups (250 gm) rolled oats
  • 1 cup (110 gm) hazelnuts, chopped
  • 1 cup (60 gm) unsweetened coconut chips
  • 1/3 cup cacao nibs
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/3 cup (100 gm) maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup (60 gm) extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup (100 gm) brown sugar, packed
  • 1/3 cup (50 gm) golden raisins

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the oats, hazelnuts, coconut chips, cacao nibs, and salt. Set aside.
  2. In a small saucepan on the stove over low heat, stir to combine the maple syrup, olive oil, and brown sugar. Stir regularly and remove from heat when the brown sugar has dissolved. Pour the syrup mixture over the oat mixture and stir to toss evenly. Spread the mixture out onto a large sheet pan and bake in the oven for 35-40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes or so. Once the mixture is barely golden and dry, remove from the oven. Toss in the golden raisins and seal in a large bag or tupperware once cool.

Notes

  • I love the balance of salt here, but feel free to trim back 1/4 teaspoon if desired.

 

Poached Pear Trifles

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m slowly learning that parenting is approximately 20% trickery. Whether it be with potty training, getting dressed for school, or even coercing them into (or out of) the bath, I often find myself leaning on trickery to get my kids to do what I want them to do. Awesome parenting, right? 

Take for instance eating new foods. The current battle royale in our home is convincing my kids that they will like a food they’ve never tried before. Now don’t be fooled into thinking this issue lies specifically with fruits, vegetable, or other decidedly “healthy” foods. No, it seems that when my children come under the notion that they will not like a food they will simply refuse to eat it, often with little reason at all. This morning, Aimee decided she didn’t want bagels with cream cheese and jam. Yes, you read right- bagels.  She took one look at it and had a near meltdown. Did I know she would like the bagel? Yes. Was I sure it would take only one bite for her to fall in love with those chewy rounds of bread? For sure. But you try convincing a strong-willed 4-year-old of that. Impossible.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

In some respect, I understand. I have tricked them into eating out of the ordinary dishes before. There was the sushi incident of 2015 and that one time I tried to pass off spaghetti squash as actual noodles. No amount of butter can turn cauliflower into real mashed potatoes, and I know my kids don’t believe me when I tell them their plain Greek yogurt is the same thing their friends eat out of plastic tubes at school. So in a way, experience has taught them they can’t take me at my word. Again, awesome parenting, right?

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

If we’re being completely transparent, there’s a lot of foods I simply won’t spring for either. The best example I can come up with right now is when people try to pass off non-dessert items as dessert. Like, a cheese plate? Not dessert. Diet wafers? I’d rather not. When I indulge in dessert I really want it to satisfy my sweet tooth in a special and indulgent way, so even things like fruit, for me, don’t work as a dessert. That is, until these poached pear trifles. 

A pear, on it’s own, wouldn’t really send me over the edge into dessert bliss. But what if that pear had been poached in cinnamon and red wine? What if they were layered with perfect, buttery French madeleines and a creamy whipped filling? What if the whole thing was topped with sugary-spiced nuts? TOTALLY DESSERT.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m sharing today’s recipe for these poached pear trifled with Donsuemor, the makers of the most delicious French madeleines. Made with the very best ingredients and no preservatives or artificial coloring, Donsuemor’s madeleines are dessert all on their own but extra-special when layered in a festive holiday dish like this. Although I ordered online, you can pick these little guys up at Costco and the rest of your desserts are history! You can use them in place of lady fingers in tiramisu, serve them alongside bowls of homemade ice cream, or even dip them in melted chocolate and crushed candies for a semi-homemade treat. I love from-scratch desserts as much as the next person, but in a treat like these poached pear trifles, it’s worth relying on a trustworthy brand to do some legwork for you.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

To make these poached pear trifles we start with the pears. Peeled and quartered pears are cooked in a red wine, sugar, and cinnamon mixture until the pears are soft to a fork. Throw in a handful of fresh cranberries to cook until soft and then remove the fruit to cool. Let the wine mixture continue to cook until slightly reduced and thickened. In the meantime you can prep the filling! I’ve made this filling both with mascarpone and cream cheese, so you can use whichever you prefer. Mascarpone cheese definitely changes the texture of the filling in a way that I didn’t prefer as much as the cream cheese, but you can make that choice for yourself. Simply whip with heavy cream until the mixture is lightly fluffed. Orange zest is added for just a smidge of flavor too.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Both the pears and the cream can be made slightly in advance and layered in with the madeleines just before serving. Add some wine syrup to the bottom of a glass with some of the fruit, top with a madeleine and cream, and then repeat the process again. I finished the dish off with fresh pomegranate and candied nuts, but this is entirely optional. These poached pear trifles just scream FANCY and are perfect for this holiday time of year. I hope you’ll give them a try in the coming weeks and check out Donsuemor’s site for more info on these yummy little bites.

Wish me luck in the “tricking your toddler” department. So far I’m losing that battle, but I think there’s still plenty of hope. Happy Friday to you all and happy baking!

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

This post is sponsored by Donsuemor. Thank you for supporting brands that make Wood and Spoon possible.

If you like these poached pear trifles you should check out:

Cookie Butter Pretzel Mousse

Peppermint Bark Icebox Cake

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Shortcakes

 

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Poached Pear Trifles

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

These poached pear trifles feature red-wine soaked fruit, a fluffy and tangy whipped filling, and buttery homemade madeleines. Adapt the recipe to make anywhere from 4 to 8 servings!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Total Time: 90
  • Yield: 8 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the pears:

  • 1 bottle mild red wine (I used a red table blend)
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 21/2 pounds of pears (I used Barletts), peeled, cored, and quartered
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ¾ cup fresh cranberries (optional)

For the cream:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Additional items:

  • 6 French Madeleines (I use Donsuemor)
  • ½ cup pomegranate seeds
  • Candied walnuts, pecans, or almonds, if desired

Instructions

To prepare the pears:

  1. Combine the wine and sugar in a large saucepan over medium heat, and, while stirring, allow the sugar to dissolve into the wine. Once dissolved, add the pears and cinnamon stick and simmer over medium-low heat for 25-30 minutes until soft to a fork. Time will differ depending on the ripeness of your fruit. Once done, carefully remove the fruit and continue cooking the wine to reduce it another 30 minutes. If you wish to use cranberries, add them in the last 5-10 minutes of cooking. The berries will burst and lose their shape the longer they cook, so I recommend only cooking up to 10 minutes. Allow the mixture to cool if you’re making in advance, otherwise allow it to cool to taste.

To prepare the cream:

  1. Cream the cream cheese and sugar on medium speed in a large bowl until combined. Add the heavy whipping cream and beat on medium speed until thick enough to hold its shape. Add in the orange zest and vanilla and mix just to combine. Set aside in fridge until you’re ready to assemble your trifles.

To assemble the trifles:

  1. Determine if you’d like to make 8 smaller (Weck Jar Sized) or 4 larger (as in the glasses shown here) trifles. If your pear mixture has been chilled, feel free to rewarm to a comfortable temperature briefly. Cut the pears into large chunks if you wish the trifles to be eaten easily with a spoon and stir them in with the cranberries and wine. Spoon a small layer of this mixture into the bottom of each dish and dollop a layer of cream on top of that. Pinch off a few pieces of madeleine to place on top of the cream and repeat the layering of the wine and pears with the cream once more. Finish each trifle with a half of a madeleine coming out of the trifle and garnish with pomegranate seeds, nuts, and additional cranberries and pears, if desired. Serve immediately. If you wish to make these ahead you can serve them cold.

Notes

  • You can use mascarpone cheese in place of the cream cheese although the texture will change.

Pumpkin Danishes

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So you might recall that last weekend was my birthday. We spent Friday and Saturday in Birmingham with friends and family, but the actual day-of was rather standard procedure. Leading up to the day of, Aimee became fixated on preparing me breakfast in bed, and much to her delight, Brett was more than willing to help facilitate.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I wish I had a picture of her face as she tiptoed into my room that morning. Aimee had filled her tiny plastic tea party tray with miniature cups of orange juice and unicorn cereal, Mickey Mouse waffles and French toast sticks. There were cinnamon rolls and fresh coffee, even a couple of cards and those neon colored daisies that they sell at the grocery store. The whole operation just screamed “ AIMEE DID THIS,” and honestly it was one of the sweetest moments of my motherhood thus far.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

In that moment it was clear that even from a young age humans experience innate joy from celebrating the people they love. Aimee, my four year old who can’t even reach the toaster, took such delight in having a hand  in preparing something that she thought would be so special to me. She celebrated me how she would have wanted to be celebrated, and there’s so much feeling and hormonal heart swelling attached to that memory that I could cry just thinking about it. The breakfast itself was special, yes, but it was really nothing more than frozen waffles. The fun in it all for her was being able to share in something that felt out of the ordinary and celebratory. Even my four year old has figured out that it’s good to celebrate the people you love.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I adore these pumpkin danishes. They’re delicious, equal parts buttery and sweet, but they’re definitely not a run-of-the-mill breakfast food. Danishes take time and tons of intentionality. They’re not something you just whip up on a whim, and honestly, that’s kinda what I like about them. I appreciate how special they feel. I love that they’ve got more gusto than a breakfast bar or bowl of cereal. These pumpkin danishes are a dish that says, “Hey! I love you! Let’s celebrate.”

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you’ve hung out around this block long enough, you know about the danishes we’ve done in the past. The dough take time and patience, but once you understand the concept of folding and layering the dough, you’re almost all of the way there. For these pumpkin danishes, we utilize those same dough-making methods and then cut, fold, and fill them to create a cute little 3 bite treat. The pastry is 90% of the work and the filling is really simple, but I also threw in a brown butter glaze that’s really unnecessary. We’re just going all-out over here, okay?

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

The trickiest part of these pumpkin danishes is the shaping of the pastry. In the oven, the pastry will want to unfold and leave an angled corner hanging out on the edge of the danish. Instead, be sure to keep your dough cold and to press the pastry in tight when you shape them. Because the pumpkin filling has egg in it, it does tend to “grow” in the oven. To combat this, I took a cue from Yossy Arefi and doubled filled each one. I filled a little, baked the pastry, filled a little more, and did a final bake. Kinda tedious and really only necessary from an aesthetic standpoint, so if you don’t mind messy pastries you can skip this step. 

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I hope you find a reason to celebrate with these pumpkin danishes ASAP. There’s lots of happy to tap into around us if we just take the time to recognize and love on it. Happy Thursday and happy baking!

If you like these pumpkin danishes you should check out:

Brown Sugar Danishes

Braided Breakfast Danish

Swirled Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Pumpkin Pecan Tart

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby

 

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Pumpkin Danishes

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

These pumpkin danishes include a buttery pastry dough and a pumpkin spice filling. There’s an optional brown butter glaze if you’re feeling super fancy.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 240
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 4 hours 45 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the dough (Adapted from Samantha Seneviratne:

  • 1 ½ cups bread flour, plus more for rolling dough
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 14 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup cold whole milk

For the filling:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened but still cold
  • ½ cup canned pumpkin puree
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 egg, divided
  • ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • Pinch of salt

For the brown butter glaze (optional):

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon milk

Instructions

To prepare the dough:

  1. Combine the flour, granulated sugar, yeast and salt in a food processor. Add butter and pulse to combine until butter is distributed in pea-sized pieces throughout the flour. Put the flour mixture in a medium bowl.
  2. In a separate, small bowl, whisk the egg and milk with 2 tablespoons of water. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Fold the mixture until the liquid is evenly distributed, being careful to not overwork the dough. Dump the contents of the bowl out on to a lightly floured surface and pat into a rectangle. Chill for at least 3 hours, and up to 2 days.
  3. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to an 8-by-15-inch rectangle. Fold the dough in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat the rolling and folding process. Dusting with flour as needed to prevent sticking, rotate, roll, and fold a final time, ending with a small, rectangular piece of dough. Wrap the dough in Saran wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  4. Repeat the entire rolling and folding process one more time. You will have rolled and folded the dough six times. If the dough becomes loose or tacky, place in the fridge to rest for a bit. Wrap the dough and place in the fridge for 2 hours or up to overnight.
  5. To prepare the danishes:
  6. In a large bowl, cream the cream cheese, pumpkin, brown sugar, and sugar on medium speed just until smooth. Break the egg yolk and spoon most of it into the mixture, leaving some behind in a small bowl. Add the pumpkin pie spice and salt to the mixture and stir to combine. Pour the filling into a piping bag or a plastic bag with the corner snipped off. If your filling is loose, place it in the fridge while you prep your pastry.
  7.  
  8. Roll out the dough on a floured surface into a roughly 10”x13” rectangle. Trim ¼” off of each side to straighten edges and cut the dough into 12 equal sized squares (I usually make 3 rows of 4 squares.) Beat the remainder of the egg and brush a dab of it on the four corners of each square of dough. Fold each corner in to the center and press down firmly (but without pushing your finger through the dough!) Transfer each one to a parchment lined sheet pan and cover with a sheet of plastic wrap to rise and puff for about an hour or so. The dough should barely start to spring back when you touch it when it’s ready.
  9. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. If the centers of your pastries have risen a ton you can push down on the centers again. Brush the pastries with the thin layer of the reserved egg. Pipe ½ tablespoon of filling in the center of each one, reserving the additional filling.  Bake in the preheated oven for about 10 minutes and then decrease the temp to 375. You’ll notice that the pastries will have risen quite a bit and likely displaced a lot of the filling- don’t worry. We anticipated this. Quickly and carefully remove the pan from the oven and pipe an additional ½ tablespoon of filling on top. You can use the back of a spoon to move it around to cover the old filing a bit if you’d like. Continue baking at 375 for an additional 8-10 minutes or until the pastries are golden brown. Remove from oven to cool.

To prepare the glaze (optional):

  1. Cook the butter over medium heat on the stove until melted. Continue cooking, stirring all the while, until the butter has begun to brown and smells nutty. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in the powdered sugar and milk. Allow it to cool to drizzle consistency before glazing the pastries.

Mint Chocolate Souffles

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I can’t tell you how antsy I have been for Friday. Just envision me with a frizzy pony tail, wearing smelly gym clothes and about half of my children’s breakfast. Then envision the unsettling//crazy look in my eyes as I survey my home covered with a mess of toys, a sink full of dirty dishes, and a never-ending pile of laundry. The overwhelming mix of to-do lists and anxious sweating is the essence of who I have been this past week, so I could not be more thrilled that Friday is now here. Please, someone get me a cocktail.

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Admittedly, we’ve been busy. There’s been house-building stuff to tend to, tons of bloggy content to create, and a pretty constant flow of meetings, house guests, and packing. On top of that, I made the scholarly decision to  potty train George this week, and can we all just LOL at that one. Just as soon as we’re ready to walk out the door or sit down for dinner, George decides to pee in his shoes or squash down on his underwear full of you-know-what. I’m not sure if he is drinking gallons of water behind my back or if he just enjoys playing the game called “Let’s See if Mom Can Guess Which Corner I Peed in Today,” but the kid goes more than a pregnant lady in her third trimester. It’s borderline impressive.

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Thankfully, we have some fun plans to look forward to this weekend. We’re having a mini staycation in Birmingham and then my birthday is the following Monday! I’m turning thirty fun (cough: 31) and I can’t wait to celebrate. One of the many perks of being a food blogger is that you’re always allowed to make your own birthday cake, and I’m just really into being a control freak with my dessert. Stay tuned for more on that.

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

As for today’s recipe, I’m sharing these mint chocolate soufflés, a must-make from Staub’s newest cookbook. One of my favorite Instagram friends, Amanda Frederickson, was the ghost writer for this stunner, and I was so impressed by the book. Although I was allured to a number of the recipes right off the bat, I knew these mint chocolate soufflés were calling my name. 

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I love how special and celebratory the little soufflés are. Yes, they’re a bit of work, but the reward is so incredibly worth it. The recipe is seamless and there’s something incredibly gratifying about delivering something so stunning to the table. With the holidays just around the corner, you’ll want to have this recipe on standby for any fancy small gatherings or candlelit dinners.

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

The making of these mint chocolate soufflés requires a few different steps, but if you read through the instructions it will be easy to see where you can break the work up to fit your schedule. The mint creme anglaise, made with fresh mint, can be made a day or two ahead of time, and even the soufflés can hang out in your fridge for the afternoon until you’re ready to bake and serve. Just remember that you’ll want to bake these up right before serving and not a moment sooner. Your guests will want to see those lofty domed chocolate tops before they fall! Everyone just loves a dessert that comes is served individually! (PS, I used these cocottes.)

Give these mint chocolate soufflés a try and be sure to check out the new cookbook. In the meantime, I hope your Friday is full of love and dessert. Happy baking! 

If you like these mint chocolate soufflés you should check out:

Peppermint Bark Bread

Peppermint Bark Brownies

Lemon Mint Sorbet

Mint Brownie Ice Cream Cake

Mint Chocolate Sandwich Cookies

Peppermint Bark Icebox Cake

 

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Mint Chocolate Souffles

Mint Chocolate Souffles by Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy rich dark chocolate souffles with a mint creme anglais. From the Staub cookbook by Amanda Fredrickson. Served in mini cocottes or ramekins, these desserts are perfect for fancy or holiday dinner parties, birthdays and other special events. Find the how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

These mint chocolate souffles are fancy and festive, a chocolate lover’s dream. Made with a fresh mint creme anglaise, these treats are perfect a decadent after-dinner treat.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 45
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
  • Yield: 6 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the mint creme anglaise:

  • 1 cup half and half
  • 1/2 vanilla bean, split
  • 1 cup fresh mint leaves
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar

For the souffle:

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar, plus more for coating the pan
  • 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream, warmed
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 5 large egg whites
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • Powdered sugar, for sprinkling

Instructions

To make the creme anglaise:

  1. In a petite saucepan, combine the half-and-half, vanilla bean, and mint. Bring just barely to a boil over medium heat, then pour into a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the vanilla bean and mint infuse the cream for 20 minutes. Strain the cream and keep it warm.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks and granulated sugar. Gradually whisk 1/4 cup of the warm cream into the egg yolks. Slowly whisk in the remaining cream mixture. Return the cream to the French oven and cook over medium-low heat until the creme anglaise is thick enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon. Strain into a bowl, cover it with plastic wrap, and chill until ready to serve.

To make the souffle:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter the sides of 6-6 ounces ramekins or cocottes. Sprinkle each pot with sugar, coating the sides and the bottom. Discard any excess sugar.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the chocolate and warm cream. Let sit for 2 to 3 minutes, then whisk until smooth. Add 1/4 cup of the granulated sugar. the vanilla extract, and salt and mix well. Add the egg yolks and whisk to combine. Set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the egg whites and cream of tartar and mix on low speed until small bubbles begin to form. Increase the speed to high and mix until soft peaks form. Sprinkle in the remaining 1/4 cup granulated sugar, a small amount at a time, and continue to beat on high speed until smooth and flossy stiff peaks form. 
  4. Using a spatula, fold 14 of the egg white mixture into the chocolate mixture. Add the remaining egg whites, being careful not to overtax. Pour the mixture into the prepared French oven and bake for 23-27 minutes, until the souffle has risen and the top appears set. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve immediately with the creme anglaise. 

The recipe for these mint chocolate soufflés are from Staub.

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

One of my favorite things about Southern food is how deeply intertwined it is with tradition. Of course I love a fresh twist on a recipe of old, a modernized nod to something from years ago, but there’s something really special about doing things the same way the generations before you did. Souteherners have mastered the art of honoring food traditions, and I’m so grateful that this way of living is slowly rubbing off on me. 

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

Kinda like Saturday morning breakfasts. Growing up, I don’t remember my Mom spending a whole lot of time in the kitchen. She’d whip out costumes for school recitals or little crafty projects for she and I to complete on the weekend, but cooking was not her forte. Despite this, I have distinct memories of a dish she would occasionally make on Saturday mornings for the family. Equal parts food and science experiment, Mom’s “Pancake Surprise” was a meal and a show all in one. She’d fill her casserole dish with a loose batter, and I’d sit by the oven watching the confection rise and bubble and crater all over. In the end, we’d cut big squares to douse with syrup, and I just knew it was the coolest breakfast on the planet.

 

Years later, I watched someone make a Dutch baby pancake in a cast-iron skillet, and I realized that was Mom’s pancake surprise in action. I hadn’t eaten it in years, but the sight of those edges rising dramatically over the edge of the pan was enough to make my mouth water. I couldn’t wait to try it for myself. 

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

So this pecan apple Dutch baby is a nod to those Saturday traditions. Of course it’s delicious, as anything given enough butter and sugar should be, but what I love about it more than anything is watching my kids peering into the oven like I used to. Begging for more syrup like I used to. Licking their sticky fingers like I used to. Breathing new life into those things that were apart off my childhood makes me feel like we’re creating something bigger than breakfast here… we’re feeding on something that will nourish us for years to come. 

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

To make this pecan apple Dutch baby, we start with the batter. Eggs and milk are whisked with flour, sugar, and a smattering of spices. In the meantime, we melt some butter in a skillet in our piping hot oven. Carefully swirl the melted butter around the pan and pour the simple batter straight in. Allow the baby to bake and rise until brown and seriously puffed.

While the baby is baking, we can prepare the apples. More melted butter is combined with sliced apples, cinnamon, sugar, and salt. Stir until the apples have just barely softened but not lost their shape. Remove from the heat while you wait for your pecan apple Dutch baby to finish baking.

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

When the pancake is complete, I like to top it with the cinnamon apples and glazed pecans. For this, I’m so thankful to have partnered with Diamond of California Nuts. Their glazed nut toppings triumph beyond salads and are a perfect crunchy addition of sweet and salty to a number of dishes including this pecan apple Dutch baby. Here, I opted for the Maple Glazed Pecans, but any number of their options would have been terrific. I caught myself nibbling on the pecans while I waited for the pancake to finish up, so beware… they’re addicting. 

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

Although it may look a finicky breakfast to prepare, this little skillet pancake is actually quite simple and is the perfect dose of comfort and tradition to add to your Saturday mornings. I hope you’ll give it a try this weekend and share it with some people you love. Happy Friday, y’all!

If you like this pecan apple Dutch baby you should try:

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Honey Nut Biscuits

Buttermilk Pancakes

Breakfast Danish

Brown Sugar Danishes 

This post is sponsored by Diamond of California Nuts. Thank you for supporting brands that makes the recipes on this site possible!

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Pecan Apple Dutch Baby

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby by Wood and Spoon. This is a cinnamon flavored skillet pancake topped with cinnamon spiced apples and maple glazed pecans. This one bowl recipe can be make in a pinch and is a fun breakfast to make with kids. Watch this simple treat rise In the oven and top it with fall-flavored fruit and crunchy, sweet and salty nuts. Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

This pecan apple dutch baby is a giant puffy pancake topped with cinnamon-spiced apples and glazed nuts. A fun breakfast for fall, this dutch baby is a delicious treat to share! Read more about the recipe here!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 4 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the pancake:

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2/3 cup (160 gm) milk
  • 2/3 cup (95 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • ½ t cinnamon
  • ½ t apple pie spice

For the apples:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 apples (I use Granny Smith or Jonathon) peeled and sliced into ¼” slices
  • 1/3 cup (70 gm) brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon apple pie spice
  • Pinch of salt
  • Glazed Pecans, if desired
  • Vanilla Yogurt, if desired

Instructions

To prepare the pancake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Once preheated, add butter to a 10” skillet and place in the oven until just barely meted. Remove from oven and carefully swirl the butter around the perimeter and edges and bottom of pan. Meanwhile, prepare your batter.
  2. Whisk together the eggs and milk. Add the flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and apple pie spice and whisk to combine. Pour the batter into the butter-coated pan and bake for 20 minutes. Lower the heat to 300 and bake for an additional 5-8 minutes or so, until the pancake is puffed and bronzed all over. Remove from oven and top with the apples and glazed pecans. You can serve with yogurt, if desired.

To prepare the apples:

  1. Melt the butter in a small pan over medium heat. Add the apples, brown sugar, cinnamon apple pie spice, and salt. Stir to combine and allow to cook, stirring occasionally, until the apples have barely softened but not lost their shape. Serve on top of the pancake.

Inspired by NYT.

You Need to Know: How to Make Caramel

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

Approximately half of my all-time favorite recipes either begin or end with caramel. No other food satisfies my sweet and salty craving like a rich caramel sauce; no other flavor works better with my favorite chocolate cakes, apple pies, and creamy ice creams. Homemade caramel is a tricky yet essential skill that every home baker needs to master, so in today’s post we’re going to talk all the nitty gritty on how to make caramel.

WHAT IS IT?

Caramel is little more than the product of sugar that has been heated and cooked to the point of caramelization. A finished caramel has a unique taste and can be manipulated to flavor a number of confections.

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

HOW DO YOU MAKE IT?

This is the question that used to keep me up at night. I’d lie awake, shuddering at the burned, sugar-coated mess in my kitchen sink, wondering where I went wrong. After a bit of research and some time spent with my food scientist hat on, I’ve figured out what works best for me to create a delicious, no-fail caramel every time. Let’s dig in. 

Two Ways to Make Caramel:

There are two methods to make a caramel: dry and wet. In some instances, sugar is heated in a pan solo and allowed to melt, cook, and caramelize without the help of any other ingredient. In other cases, sugar is dissolved in a bit of water and the syrup itself is what caramelizes on the stove. Although many of the baking resources I revere prefer a dry caramel, I have found, in my personal experience, that a wet caramel is much more simple to nail every time. So from here on out today, we’re going to talk about that method. If you’re just dying to make a dry caramel, I’d recommend checking out David Lebovitz’s explanation of that process here. He will help you to avoid the grainy mess that a dry caramel can often be.

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

Step One: Combine the Sugar and Water 

Gather up all of your ingredients and have them ready before you start cooking. Once a caramel is on a roll it’s hard to get that train to stop. So have everything you need to finish out your caramel prepped and ready.

You’ll need a large, heavy-bottomed pan, a rubber spatula, and your water and sugar to get started. I chose to use my enamel-coated cast-iron pot, but any kind of stainless steel or light-colored pan will work. If you plan to add cream of milk to the caramel after it’s done (as you would with an ice cream or caramel sauce), you’ll need to be sure to use a large pan as liquid added to caramel will bubble up fiercely. Try to avoid using any pan with a dark-colored bottom, as it is more difficult to tell when your caramel has reached the appropriate level of doneness.  Combine the sugar and water in the pan and place it over medium-high heat.

Step Two: Allow the Sugar to Dissolve

The first phase of making a caramel is allowing the sugar to dissolve into the water. Throughout this phase you can stir the mixture in your pan as you please. You’ll notice the mixture changes from being a grainy water to a slightly viscous syrup. Continue to stir occasionally until the sugar has just barely dissolved. To verify that the sugar has dissolved, carefully rub a bit of the non-boiling mixture between your fingers. If you notice a grainy feel, the sugar has not dissolved yet. Keep cooking until the mixture feels smooth between your fingers.

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

Step 3: Caramelize the Sugar Syrup

Once the sugar has just barely dissolved, STOP STIRRING YOUR MIXTURE. Other recipes may contradict this statement, but in my experience, stirring a caramel will lead to a pan full of rock candy- no joke. So just leave it alone while it comes to a boil and begins to bronze. Some recipes may call for you to “baste” the sides of your pan with a pastry brush dipped in water to prevent crystals from forming along the perimeter of your pot. You’re totally welcome to do this if you prefer, but I find that if you truly leave it alone on the stove the crystal build-up on the pan won’t be too bad.

Once the syrup has come to a boil, you’ll likely notice the color will first begin changing around the edges of the pan. If you see that some parts of the syrup are browning a lot faster than others, you can give an occasional gentle swirl to the pan- one time, barely moving it, and really just to allow the mixture to caramelize evenly. Be sure to not swirl the mixture all over the sides of the pan. Continue to let the mixture cook on the stove.

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

As you begin to see the mixture turn golden, do not leave your pan’s side. The caramelization process happens quick, and you want to be there when it’s time to remove it from the heat. From golden, the mixture will continue to darken. Pull you pan off of the heat  when you see the mixture turn to the color of a shiny copper penny. That’s how you know it’s done!

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

Step 4: Stop the Cooking Process

Once the caramel is the perfect shade of auburn, you need to stop the cooking process to prevent it from burning. If you’re making a caramel sauce or chewy caramel candies, this is when you’d carefully add the cream or milk to your pan. If you’re using the caramel to line your pan for a upside-down cake or flan, now is the time to add it to the dish! And if you need to stop the cooking process so that the warm caramel can be spun or added to a number of other dishes, have a bowl of ice water ready to dunk the bottom of your pan in. If you don’t stop the heat, the caramel will likely burn, so have your next steps laid out for you before you even begin the process. 

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

HOW CAN I USE IT?

More often than not, when I’m making caramel, I use it to create a caramel sauce. There’s almost always a jar of homemade caramel sauce in my fridge waiting to be spooned over ice cream, layered into cakes, or sandwiched in between cookies. I’ll leave a few links below to some of my favorite caramel-containing recipes.

Caramel Apple Pie

Espresso Caramel Thumbprint Cookies 

Chocolate Caramel Crumble Cake

Turtle Ice Cream

ANYTHING ELSE I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CARAMEL?

Yes. David Lebovitz wrote a whole post about this that you need to read here. If you’ve never made homemade caramel before, you’ll want to give this a read ASAP. He’s really a food genius, so you can trust what he says!

Give homemade caramel a try in your home kitchens this weekend. If you follow these steps, I feel confident you can have success in the kitchen! I’m sharing my favorite recipe for homemade caramel sauce below as well, so if you want to finish out the caramel in a decadent, use-everywhere kind of sauce, this is your chance! Happy Labor Day weekend and happy baking!

If you liked this post on how to make caramel, you should check out:

How to Brown Butter

How to Make Whipped Cream

How to Make Ganache

 

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How to Make Caramel and Caramel Sauce

You Need to Know How to Make Caramel by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a tutorial with visual cues on how to caramelize sugar. Learn how to know when caramel is done, when to pull caramel off the heat, and how to prevent a crystallized, grainy caramel mess! Learning about caramel is an essential baking skill that you can master today! Read more here on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood caramel sauce, salted, spun sugar, drizzle

Learn how to make homemade caramel and homemade salted caramel sauce here!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 2
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 17 minutes
Scale

Ingredients

To make caramel:

  • 1/4 Cup Water
  • 1 Cup Sugar

To make salted caramel sauce:

  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream, slightly warm
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

To make caramel:

  1. Stir the water and sugar together in a large heavy-bottomed, light-colored pan. Set the pan over medium high heat. Stir occasionally, allowing the sugar to dissolve. Once the sugar granules have dissolved completely, quite stirring the mixture and allow it the sugar to come to a boil. Once the mixture begins boiling, watch it carefully as the mixture turns from clear, to pale yellow, to golden. You can swirl the mixture occasionally to keep it browning evenly. After about 9 minutes of boiling, the mixture willl turn into a deep color, similar to a shiny copper penny. Remove the mixture from the heat and use immediately. 

To make salted caramel sauce:

  1. Once you caramel has completed browning, remove from heat and immediately being to slowly add the heavy whipping cream, whisking vigorously to incorporate. Wear oven mitts during this process to ensure that the fierce steam and bubbling doesn’t spatter or burn your hands. Place back on low heat and continue stirring for about 1-2 minutes until the mixture is smooth and incorporated. Add the butter and salt, stir to combine, and allow the mixture to cool in a heat-proof container. Keep refrigerated until ready to use. 

Notes

Once the sugar has caramelized to the correct color it will burn if you do not stop the cooking! Read through the post for more tips on creating the perfect caramel!

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Today’s post is all about a summertime staple that should make your life easier. With so much going on, I think we should simplify these summer days so that we can spend a little more time actually enjoying them. If you’re up for taking a load off your proverbial plate in a beautiful and delicious way, look no further than this stone fruit skillet cobbler.

For starters, I just want to say “LOL” to the summer. It wasn’t long ago that the term “summer break” induced visions of binge-watching “Full House” and drinking Diet Cokes by the pool with my friends. Summer used to be primarily about tan lines and an extended curfew, those days when the biggest concern to be had was whether or not that bottle of Nair would destroy your bikini area. Let’s just have a moment of silence for the easy days of our youth, shall we?

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Of course in adulthood that reality changes as work schedules and managers and deadlines really don’t take a break. Even then, it’s easy to take the occasional long weekend or beachside snooze because you are on your own schedule. Instead, for me, it took having kids to remember that summer is no longer about beach lounging and googling things like, “where is Johnathan Taylor Thomas after Home Improvement,” because now you’re on kid schedule, and let me tell you- kid schedule is way more complicated. 

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Let’s say you have a couple of hours to kill and you want to take your kids to the pool. Once you factor in time for applying sunscreen, feeding them snacks, trips to timeout for stealing someone else’s diving rings, and then reapplying sunscreen, your time spent swimming is actually, well, none. This is also assuming that the trip wasn’t cut short at the hands of a diaper explosion or a sunscreen-in-the-eyes meltdown. If so, factor in a deficit of thirty minutes for time spent in that disgustingly wet public bathroom. RIP your daily morale.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Or let’s say you want to have an afternoon picnic, get out of the house for some exercise. If so, I sincerely hope you live somewhere north of the Mason/Dixon line or have chosen a cloudy day for this adventure, because your kid will not be having it. They’re going to be hot! They’ll be sweaty! Their legs will hurt, they’ll need some ice water, they’ll want to go home to collect 103 very important items that they left behind. Summer adventures with kids, in my experience, turn into misadventures, so just don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Lest you feel discouraged at the outlook of summers with kids, let me say that I do think this will all end up being worth it. The opportunity to watch those littles experience the freedom and newness of each summer for the first time makes for a memorable experience. I’m going to keep taking photos and biting my tongue when I want to freak out because there is sweetness in this season, even if it is in the midst of a little stress. And in the meantime, I’m working to scale back in other ways, a de-clutter of my to-do list, so that I can really try to focus on enjoying the moment I’m in, ya know? 

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

First up is this stone fruit skillet cobbler. This is an adaptable recipe that you can modify to fit whatever fruit you pick up at the farmers market or find lying in the nether regions of your freezer. You can make the dough for the biscuity/scone-like topping a few hours, days, whatever in advance and plop it on your fruit filling when the craving hits. The topping here is a combination of my favorite scone and my biscuit recipe. It’s tender, almost cakey, but super delicious in flavor. In place of some of the flour, I’ve added cornmeal for texture and to compliment the sweet fruit. When baked, this topping has crisp, buttery edges and a soft biscuit-like center that goes splendidly with a juicy fruit filling.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

I opted to use peaches, cherries, and plums for this particular stone fruit skillet cobbler, but you can really use whatever fruit you have on hand! The most important part is making sure to add the right amount of sugar. If you’re working with super sweet fruit, like strawberries, figs, or blueberries, you will likely require less sugar to add to the filling. In my case, the addition of tart plums required a smidge more sugar, so just be sure to adjust the recipe by a tablespoon or two as needed. I love to take whatever fruit is threatening to die in my fridge and throw it in mini, ramekin-sized portions for individuals treats as well. Just make sure your baking container is large enough to avoid an overflow of fruit syrup burning on the bottom of your oven. I learned this the hard way.

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Moms, I’m giving you a badge of courage for taking these summer days in stride. As a reward, enjoy this stone fruit skillet cobbler and just give yourself a pat on the back for being freaking awesome, okay? Happy baking, y’all!

If you like this stone fruit skillet cobbler you should check out:

Cherry Gateau Basque 

Cherry Lime Hand Pies

Peach Berry Pie

Peach Crumb Muffins

Chocolate Budino

 

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Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler

Stone Fruit Skillet Cobbler recipe by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple summer fruit dessert fit for any of your favorites- peaches, plum, berries, nectarines, cherries, etc! The topping is a biscuit / scone like topping scooped on top with cornmeal and butter. It's a simple make ahead dish that will let your summer produce shine. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

This stone fruit skillet cobbler is a simple way to use up fresh summer produce and can be easily adapted for a variety of your favorites!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 6 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the filling:

  • Two pounds of cored stone fruit (peaches, plums, nectarines, cherries, etc)
  • About ½1 cup (100 gm-200 gm) sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt

For the topping:

  • 3/4 cup (105 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons cornmeal
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 11/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 5 tablespoons (70 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • ½ cup (120 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • Extract sugar for sprinkling
  • Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Instructions

To prepare the cobbler:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 and prep the filling. Core and chop fruit into 1/2” pieces and be sure that any peaches have been peeled. You can keep the skin on plums, cherries, and nectarines. Toss the fruit with the remaining filling ingredients and sugar to taste. I like to start with ½ cup sugar for ripe, sweet fruit. If you’re using any tart or not fully ripened fruit, you’ll likely need about ¾ cup of sugar instead. Only add the full cup of sugar for really sour fruit. Dump the fruit mixture into a 1-1/2 quart baking dish and set aside while you prep the topping.
  2. Combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Use a pastry cutter or the backs of two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until pea-sized clumps form. Add the heavy whipping cream and stir together until a dry dough comes together. Use a medium cookie scoop or your hands to make little flat rounds of dough to place directly on top of the fruit in the baking dish. Sprinkle with a little extract sugar and baking in the preheat oven for about 35 minutes, or until the topping is golden and the fruit underneath is bubbling. Allow to cool slightly before serving with a scoop of ice cream.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

As a mother of two toddlers, I spend a lot of time playing make believe. Whether we’re eating crumpets at a tea party, hunting down an imaginary bear, or calling Mickey Mouse on the telephone, this kind of play is a fun way to connect the real with the imaginary. Currently, princesses reign supreme in our house, and it’s not unusual for at least two or three of us to be clicking around in plastic high heels, fluffy skirts, and play jewelry. The biggest compliment you can give my daughter is to tell her she looks like a princess, because to her, it’s the highest honor.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

Here’s the thing: from a young age, kids know and love the concept of royalty. There’s something special and fanciful about dressing up and being an elite version of yourself. Even as adults, we get caught up in real-life royal weddings, romances, feuds, and even deaths because those humans and the lives they lead feel distinguished and extraordinary, a little like a lifetime of playing dress-up. There’s not a single woman reading this who, at one point, didn’t dream of a life like this of our own. We’re engrained to delight in the fancy things.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So why not? Even as adults, we can still play pretend! We can invite our girlfriends over, open our nicest bottle of wine, and be fancy. We can ignore our sometimes dull surroundings, clothing, and lifestyles, and dream up a champagne and caviar world. Yes, we love and honor the beauty of our realities, but we can gussy-up what we’ve got and put our pinkies out for a day. In fact, I think we should do it. 

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So cue the tiramisu cream puffs.

Even if you’ve grown up eating tiny fancy-pants treats like cream puffs, I can almost bet you’ve never had ones made with a tiramisu filling. While even an experienced home baker may be intimidated by attempting something like this in their own kitchen, I can promise you that these treats are attainable, and you’ll be so proud of yourself when you make these little showstoppers. Scout’s honor.

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

To make your own tiramisu cream puffs, we start with the pastry. Here, the pastry we’re making is called choux. This classic French staple is made by cooking butter, water and flour into a thick pasty dough and beating in a few eggs. In the oven, it bakes into light and airy rounds with a flavor similar to a popover. It’s hollow center is perfect for piping in yumminess like the mascarpone filling we use for these tiramisu cream puffs. 

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

To prepare the filling, we beat some mascarpone cheese with Kahlua, or another coffee-flavored liquor. We fold that into a homemade whipped cream which fluffs up our choux filling. For the topping, we make a simple ganache to drizzle over or dip our cream puffs into. Once completed, these tiramisu cream puffs are fancy finger treats fit for a princess- shockingly simple for such a special outcome. 

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

The truth is, we all have a little fancy in us. It looks different from person to person, but it’s 100% okay to play the part every once in a while. I hope you’ll delight yourself in the fancy sometime this summer, and maybe, if you do, you’ll make these tiramisu cream puffs for the occasion. Happy Wednesday, friends, and happy baking!

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you like these tiramisu cream puffs you should try:

Tiramisu Cake

Coffee Donuts

Coffee Almond Scones

Homemade Chocolates

 

 

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Tiramisu Cream Puffs

Tiramisu Cream Puffs by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe for homemade pate chow filled with a coffee whipped cream and topped with a thick chocolate ganache glaze. The pastry is made simply on the stove and baked into round profiteroles. The cream is made with Kahlua flavored liquor and mascarpone cheese. The topping is rich with dark chocolate and heavy cream. Learn how to make these fancy finger food desserts on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

These tiramisu cream  puffs are bite-sized profiteroles filled with a mascarpone and coffee whipped cream. Each puff is topped with thick dark chocolate ganache. Perfect option for a fancy finger food! 

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 35
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 15 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the choux (adapted from Rose Levy Beranbaum):

  • ½ cup (120 gm) water
  • 4 tablespoons (55 gm) unsalted butter
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ cup (70 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs

For the tiramisu cream:

  • 4 ounces mascarpone cheese, at cool room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons coffee liquor (I use Kahlua)
  • 1 cup (240 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • ¾ cup (90 gm) powdered sugar

For the ganache:

  • 1/3 cup (80 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • 4 ounces chopped dark chocolate

Instructions

For the choux:

  • Preheat the oven to 425 degrees and line a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper. Fit a piping bag with a large round tip (I use Ateco 809) or snip the end off of a quart-sized freezer plastic bag.
  • In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the water, butter, sugar and salt until the butter has melted and the mixture is boiling. Remove the saucepan from the heat and add all of the flour, stirring vigorously to combine. After a few moments of stirring, the dough will form a moist ball that pulls away from the sides of the pan. Return the pan back to the heat to cook, paddling the dough with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula for 3 minutes. Dump the dough into a large bowl and add the eggs one at a time, stirring vigorously after each addition to combine.  The dough should be viscous enough to hold a soft peak when you pull the wooden spoon out of it. If it is too stiff, add a teaspoon or two of water. Scoop the mixture into the piping bag and squeeze out tablespoon-sized round balls (see photo) of dough, about 2 inches apart on the prepared pan. Barely moisten a fingertip to smooth out any peaks on the rounds so that they are rounded disks, similar to the shape of a baked macaron cookie. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes, then decrease the oven temp to 350 and bake an additional 15-20 minutes, or until the puffs are golden brown. Allow to cool prior to using.

For the tiramisu cream:

  1. Beat the mascarpone and coffee liquor with a hand mixer on medium speed for about 30 seconds or until smooth. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, whip the heavy whipping cream on medium speed until slightly thickened. Add the powdered sugar and continue whipping until stiff peaks form. Use a rubber spatula to gently fold the mascarpone mixture into the whipped cream. Set aside in the fridge until the cream puffs have cooled to room temperature. When ready to fill, slice a tiny slit onto the top of each cream puff. Spoon the tiramisu cream into a piping bag fitted with a round tip and fill each puff with cream until full. Set aside while you make the ganache.

For the ganache:

  1. Heat the heavy whipping cream in the microwave or on the stove until steaming. Pour the hot cream over top of the chopped chocolate in a small bowl and cover the whole thing with a sheet of plastic wrap. After 5 minutes, stir the mixture until smooth and pour a spoonful of ganache on top of each puff. Alternatively, you can dip the cream puffs. The ganache will firm up as it sets, so be sure the gently reheat as needed.