Pies

Peanut Butter Coconut Pie

The transition from summer to fall always feels like a controversial topic. Just because Labor Day, white denim, and summer break is behind us doesn’t mean we’re all jumping head-first into a vat of pumpkin spice lattes and fuzzy scarfs, right? Even so, many of us (*raises both hands*) are eagerly awaiting fall, cooler weather, and the change of flavors, sights, and textures it promises to bring. Today’s recipe teeters somewhere between the two seasons at hand. This peanut butter coconut pie, with its chilled, fluffy filling and coconut-scented layers, is reminiscent of the things I love about summer, but it’s presented with a hefty portion of peanut butter that adds a ton of rich warmth. It’s cool yet comforting, equal parts summer and fall. Let’s dive in.

Peanut Butter Coconut Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a fluffy icebox pie made with creamy peanut butter and loads of creamy coconut flavor. The crust can be made with sweetened coconut flakes, butter and either graham crackers or vanilla wafers. This is a quick and simple dessert to make for peanut butter lovers! Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com
Peanut Butter Coconut Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a fluffy icebox pie made with creamy peanut butter and loads of creamy coconut flavor. The crust can be made with sweetened coconut flakes, butter and either graham crackers or vanilla wafers. This is a quick and simple dessert to make for peanut butter lovers! Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

When Brett and I were dating, he took me on a trip to Hawaii. Truly, if ever there was a moment in time that I knew he was a keeper, it was the moment he presented me with a Delta voucher and a picture of a North Shore beach. (Brett, if you’re reading this, this is a call to action. DO THIS AGAIN!) Our 6 or so days on the island of Oahu consisted of hiking, sunbathing, and even a sunset luau, but the lingering flavor I brought home with me were a few jars of peanut butter I picked up in a gift shop. There were a number of flavored options to choose from, but the ones I chose contained chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, and for months after our trip, I enjoyed spoonfuls of coconut peanut butter as an after-dinner treat.

Peanut Butter Coconut Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a fluffy icebox pie made with creamy peanut butter and loads of creamy coconut flavor. The crust can be made with sweetened coconut flakes, butter and either graham crackers or vanilla wafers. This is a quick and simple dessert to make for peanut butter lovers! Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

I made today’s peanut butter coconut pie as an ode to that memory. Here, a lightly salted graham cracker and flaked coconut pie crust is filled with a fluffy no-bake peanut butter filling. The whole thing is topped with whipped cream and extra toasted coconut after being chilled to firm up in the fridge. If you, like me, are still living out sweltering summery days, you can even pop this pie in the fridge for a slightly frozen twist on the original recipe! Both ways are seriously divine and will make for a seasonally appropriate treat to enjoy before we go full-on fall.

Peanut Butter Coconut Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a fluffy icebox pie made with creamy peanut butter and loads of creamy coconut flavor. The crust can be made with sweetened coconut flakes, butter and either graham crackers or vanilla wafers. This is a quick and simple dessert to make for peanut butter lovers! Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

To make this peanut butter coconut pie, we start with the press-in crust. Graham cracker crumbs, flaked coconut, salt, sugar, and butter are combined and pressed into a standard pie plate. After a quick bake and cool, we can begin making the filling. Peanut butter, cream cheese, and whipped cream are lightly flavored with coconut extract and smoothed into the baked crust. After chilling, additional whipped cream and toasted coconut are added on top, both for flavor and decoration. This heaping peanut butter coconut pie is intensely satisfying and is sure to be a hit with the peanut butter lovers in your life.

Peanut Butter Coconut Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a fluffy icebox pie made with creamy peanut butter and loads of creamy coconut flavor. The crust can be made with sweetened coconut flakes, butter and either graham crackers or vanilla wafers. This is a quick and simple dessert to make for peanut butter lovers! Find the recipe and how-to on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Summer, Happy Fall, Happy Whatever, just make sure you give this peanut butter coconut pie a try. I really hope you enjoy! xo, kate

If you like this peanut butter coconut pie you should try:

Peanut Butter Pie
Peanut Butter Honey Graham Ice Cream Cake
Peanut Butter Cup Bars
Southern Coconut Cream Pie
Banana Coconut Chocolate Cream Pie

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Peanut Butter Coconut Pie

This peanut butter coconut pie features a salted graham cracker crust and a fluffy peanut butter and coconut no-bake filling!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 360
  • Yield: 9 Servings 1x
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

Scale

For the crust:

  • 185 gm graham cracker crumbs (vanilla wafers can also be used!)
  • ¾ cup (65 gm) sweetened coconut flakes
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 6 tablespoons (85 gm) unsalted butter, melted

For the filling:

  • 11/2 cups (360 ml) heavy cream
  • 1 block / 8 ounces (225 gm) of cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 cup (255 gm) peanut butter
  • ½ teaspoon coconut extract
  • 11/4 cups (155 gm) confectioner’s sugar

For the topping:

  • 1 cup (240 ml) heavy cream
  • 1-/4 cup (50 gm) sugar
  • ¼ cup (20 gm) sweetened coconut flakes, toasted

Instructions

To prepare the crust: 

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. In a large bowl, combine the graham cracker crumbs, coconut flakes, sugar, salt, and butter, stirring to combine. Press the crust into the sides and bottom of a standard pie pan and bake in the preheated oven, about 8 minutes or until set. Allow to cool.

To prepare the filling:

  1. In a large bowl, beat the heavy cream on medium speed until thickened to a fluffy, cloud-like consistency. Set aside. In that same bowl, beat to combine the cream cheese, peanut butter, and coconut extract until smooth and no lumps remain. Stir in the confectioner’s sugar just until smooth. Fold in the prepared whipped cream and spread the filling into the cooled pie crust. Cover with a sheet of plastic wrap and allow the pie to set up in the fridge for about 4-6 hours, or overnight. 

To prepare the topping:

  1. When ready to serve the pie, whip the topping’s heavy cream and sugar in a large bowl on medium speed until thickened to a fluffy, cloud-like consistency. Dollop on top of the pie and sprinkle with the toasted coconut flakes. Serve chilled!

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Blueberry Maple Pie

After last week’s *lengthy* discussion on pie dough, I had no choice but to deliver you a pie this week. What say we put our newfound how-to skills to work? This blueberry maple pie is a delightfully delicious way to experiment with pie dough: the filling contains only simple, approachable ingredients, so the fruit and crust really shine. If you are looking for a great recipe to segue from summer to fall, this pie is definitely it.

Blueberry Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a flaky crusted summer fruit blueberry pie naturally sweetened with maple syrup and barely spiced with a hint of cinnamon. This summer dessert transition into a fall treat seamlessly with ripe produce and warm flavors. Learn how simple it is to make an old fashioned southern lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

In writing the description for this pie, I had to boast that is was naturally sweetened with maple syrup- not because I’m particularly invested in natural sweeteners (I’m not), but because I know that’s really important for some of you guys, right? So yes, this blueberry maple pie is naturally sweetened, but that benefits even those of us who aren’t necessarily baking for health. The maple syrup in this pie lends interesting flavor and subtle nuance, complementing both the fruit and the added lemon zest and cinnamon. Truly, it’s a win-win for all parties involved here.

To make this blueberry maple pie, we start with perfect pie crust. My recipe utilizes all-purpose flour, butter (for flavor), and shortening (for flake), as well as sugar and salt. All of the ingredients can come together in a food processor or a large bowl of your choosing. The dough does need to chill briefly, so feel free to prep the dough the night (or week!) before. The filling here is simple: fresh berries, maple syrup, cinnamon, and the zest and juice of a single lemon. Together, they combine to make a pie filling that is juicy, sweet, and layered with flavor.

Blueberry Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a flaky crusted summer fruit blueberry pie naturally sweetened with maple syrup and barely spiced with a hint of cinnamon. This summer dessert transition into a fall treat seamlessly with ripe produce and warm flavors. Learn how simple it is to make an old fashioned southern lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Once the pie dough has been prepared, roll it out into a standard pie plate of your choosing and fill it with the blueberry mixture. The top here can be done according to your preferences: you can take this opportunity to braid or lattice, or you can just not. Either way, this pie will bake up in the bottom third of your oven to a golden brown that is actually worth writing home about.

With summer fruit on the way out and fall flavors coming to town, this blueberry maple pie is fitting and delicious for the times. Give it a try this week and let me know what you think! Happy Saturday to you, and Happy Baking!

If you like this blueberry maple pie you should try:

Blueberry Sour Cream Pie
Peach Berry Pie
Blueberry Galette with a Cornmeal Crust
Blueberry Lemon Pop-Tarts
Berry Slab Pie

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Blueberry Maple Pie

This yummy summer pie is naturally sweetened with maple syrup and scented with fresh lemon zest and a sprinkle of cinnamon!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 75
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 9 Servings 1x
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

Scale

For the crust:

  • 3 ½ cups (420 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 3 teaspoons (12 gm) sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon (4 gm) salt
  • 2/3 cup (135 gm) chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into pieces
  • 3/4 cup (11/2 sticks, 170 gm) chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 10 tablespoons (approximately) ice water

For the filling:

  • 4 cups fresh or frozen blueberries
  • 1 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1 tsp lemon zest (from about 1 lemon)
  • 11/2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about 1 lemon)
  • ¼ cup cornstarch
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

For the egg wash:

  • 1 egg
  • 2 teaspoons sugar

Instructions

To prepare the crust:

  1. Give the dry ingredients a whiz in the food processor to combine.
  2. Pulse in the shortening and butter, just until barely evenly dispersed.
  3. Begin adding ice water, 2 tablespoons at a time until moist clumps begin to form.
  4. Remove dough from food processor and separate in two flat round disks. Wrap in Saran wrap and chill for at least two hours prior to use.

 To prepare the pie:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. I also like to preheat a baking steel or heavy-duty sheet pan on the bottom third of the oven- this is recommended for a crisp-bottomed crust. 
  2. In a large bowl, combine the filling ingredients. Set aside while you roll out your pie dough.
  3. On a floured surface, roll out one half of the chilled pie dough to a 1/8-1/4” thick round approximately 1” wider on all sides than the lip of your standard pie pan. Roll the dough onto a floured rolling pin and unroll into the pan. Gently work the dough into the bottom and sides of the pan. Leave about 1” of dough extending outside the perimeter of the dish and trim off any excess.
  4. Pour the fruit mixture into the pie dish. Place in the fridge while you prepare you pie top. Latticing is optional here; if you plan to leave a plain single sheet of dough on top of the filling, be sure to vent the top with a couple of slits from your knife. Crimp the edges once finished.
  5. In a small both, whisk together the egg and use a pastry brush to paint a thin layer of the egg wash on the top of the pie crust. Sprinkle with the sugar. Place the pie on the preheated baking sheet and bake for 45 minutes. At that time, check the crust; if the edges are looking too done, make a pie collar out of aluminum foil to gently drape the edges of the pie.  degrees. Continue baking for an additional 20-30 minutes, or until the middle of the pie has bubbling juices underneath and the top of the pie crust is golden brown. Allow the pie to cool on a cooling rack completely, or overnight. Cutting into the pie too soon can cause the pie to be too runny, but if this doesn’t bother you, you can cut into it as soon as it is a manageable and safe temperature. Serve with ice cream if desired!

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YOU NEED TO KNOW: How to Make Pie Dough

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

I’ll be honest: I’ve spent the last 10 minutes debating on whether to save this post until early-Novemberish when Thanksgiving dinners and holiday soirees have us all scrambling to make photo-worthy pies filled with canned pumpkin and toasty pecans. In the end, I considered my fridge full of summer berries, Chilton County peaches, and the first of this season’s cherries and decided now was as good of time as any to teach y’all how to make and bake a beautiful (and delicious!) pie dough. If you’re looking for tips on press-in crusts or store-bought varieties, this is not the post for you, but if it’s braided double crusts and flaky pastry you’re after, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s dive in on how to make pie dough.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

What Is It?

Any homemade pie crust starts with a plain pastry dough. Unlike doughs made for tarts, strudels, or cream puffs, pie dough is typically made with three simple ingredients: flour, fat, and water. That’s it! Although other ingredients like eggs, sugar, and salt can be added to manipulate the flavor, color, and texture of your final pastry, it’s the type and proportion of those three main ingredients that makes all the difference.

Flour

The right amount and type of flour can make all the difference in a homemade pie dough. Unbleached all-purpose flour is typically chosen for standard pie crusts, but it must be handled appropriately to yield a crust that is both tender and flaky. Too much flour can create a tough or dry crust and not enough may flour may lead to a wet crust that shrinks upon baking. Although proportions are everything to a great pie crust recipe, even perfect pastry dough can be ruined by over-manipulation. Because all-purpose flour is prone to increased gluten formation, pie doughs that are overworked may wind up being tough and dense.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

Fat

I would argue that fat is the single most important aspect of learning how to make pie dough. Fat contributes flakiness and flavor to pie dough, and different types of fat offer their own myriad of benefits. It’s widely known that shortening and lard produce the flakiest pastries thanks to its ability to coat the flour more easily than butter. Butter is often chosen for flavor, although margarine will yield similar textures. Oil is a final alternative for pie makers (I made one once here!), although it’s used less frequently and often yields a grainy crust. The amount, temperature, and method of dispersing fat into the flour makes all the difference as we’ll see in a couple paragraphs.

Water

The addition of liquid to a pie dough enables leavening. As the dough heats in the oven, steam generated from the water leavens the pastry and enhances its flakiness. Water also hydrates the dough which is helpful for gluten production, although many people add vinegar, lemon juice, or even alcohol to prevent too much gluten formation. Without enough water or liquid, pie doughs are dry or too crumbly to work with, but if too much liquid is added, crusts make shrink or become too tough.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

How to Make Pie Dough

First, flour is combined with salt, sugar, and any other dry ingredient being used to flavor the crust. Once evenly combined, the fat is cut into the dry ingredients using a pastry cutter, a food processor, or even just your hands. Continue cutting in the fat until it has been evenly incorporated and is broken down into pea or marble-sized pieces. Keeping the fat cold and working quickly helps to ensure that the pastry will remain flaky and prevent gluten formation. Once the fat has been thoroughly integrated into the flour, ice water or another cold liquid is tossed into the sandy mixture until the flour has been barely moistened and a shaggy dough comes together.

Quite often, dough is chilled prior to use which makes it easier to handle and enhances the final baked product. Because the dough should be manipulated as little as possible, some doughs may need to sit at room temperature for 5-10 minutes to rolling to make the job easier.

Pastry Cutter vs. Food Processor, vs. Hands

99% of the time, I opt for my pastry cutter when it comes to preparing pie dough. The reason is simple: I don’t trust my fingers to do the job well but I also don’t love the clean-up involved with my food processor. A great pastry cutter can make the job quick and the clean-up simple, so, for me, it’s a win-win. With that being said, don’t sleep on those other methods. If you’re new to pie dough, a food processor might help distribute the fat into the flour more evenly, but there are some benefits to working in the fat by hand too; as your fingers flatten the fat into the flour, those chunky pieces will create holes in your crust that enhance its overall flakiness. The bottom line is, this is a choose-your-own adventure kind of deal. Do what works best for you.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

How Is It Used?

Once prepared and chilled, homemade pie dough can be used to make any number of treats. Although it’s typically used for dessert pies, you’ll also find that same dough being used for quiche, hand pies, and more! For today’s post, I’m going to spend time talking about the areas I get the most questions about: storing pie dough, rolling, crimping, and braiding pie dough, and baking pie dough.

Storing Pie Dough

Once prepared, most pie dough need some chill time. This isn’t a Netflix and chill kind of situation: this is a temperature situation. I like to ready my pie dough for the fridge by patting it into a flat round disk and wrapping it in plastic wrap. The wrap will protect it from drying out in the fridge. If you plan to make a slab pie or any kind of squared-off pastry, you may find it easier to chill it in a flat rectangle shape that will be easier to roll out after chilling.

If you don’t plan to use your pie dough right away, you can typically store it in the fridge up to a week in advance. Any longer, and you’re better off leaving it in the freezer. Simply wrap your plastic-wrapped dough in a sheet of heavy duty aluminum foil and freeze on a flat surface. Once frozen, pie doughs can be saved up to 6 months. When you’re ready to use it, just thaw out overnight in the fridge and allow it to rest at room temperature about 10 minutes or until it’s pliable for rolling.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

Rolling Pie Dough

As with most pastry dough, rolling pie dough is best done on a cool, lightly-floured surface. My marble counters make an excellent place for rolling, but pastry mats and other flat surfaces will work brilliantly as well. Using a lightly floured rolling pin, begin rolling from the center of the dough to the outer edges, using short, firm strokes. Every few rolls or so, gently slide your hand under the dough to make sure your surface is still thoroughly floured. If you find more flour is needed, gently roll the dough onto the floured pin and sprinkle additional flour as needed. For most crusts, pie dough should be rolled to 1/8″-1/4″ thickness. Check to make sure your dough is large enough by holding your pie plate over the rolled-out round of dough; the dough should be an inch wider on all sides, larger if you’re working with a deep-dish pie plate.

To transfer your pie dough to a pie plate, gently roll the pie dough onto your rolling pin and unroll into the pie plate! If this method doesn’t suit you, rolled-out rounds of chilled and lightly floured dough can be folded in quarters, picked up, and unfolded into the pie plate. Once in the pan, tuck the dough into the edges of the pan and begin crimping or braiding your dough as desired. If you are making a double-crust pie, you can transfer your pie dough top the same way you did the bottom crust: simply roll the dough onto your rolling pin, unroll it centered on the pie, and begin crimping your edges together as desired.

Latticed Pie

A latticed pie is one of those things many people aspire to. In fact, there are tons of Instagram accounts, Pinterest boards, and more dedicated to intricately woven pie tops. Below, you’ll see a few of my favorite simple lattices. In my own kitchen, I love to use a pizza cutter and a clear sewing ruler to keep my trimmed strips the exact size I want them to be. I don’t have the patience for much beyond this, but if you do, know the principles are the same: keep your dough cold and work quickly!

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

Crimping Pie Dough

Again, nothing fancy here, just a few of my favorite crimps! When in doubt, the back of a fork is your friend. Just pinch your edges together and crimp away!

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

Preparing Pie Dough for Baking

At some point in your baking career, you’ll stumble upon a recipe that calls for an egg wash. More often than not, this is solely for aesthetic purposes. An egg wash, prepared by combining a whole or part of an egg with some kind of liquid (water, milk, or cream), is typically brushed in a thin layer on a prepared pie dough crust prior to baking. The protein, fat, and water in the wash adds color or gloss to the finished pie crust. Below, you’ll see a sampling of a few different wash varieties. Choose whichever works best for you or go for my favorite: whole egg whisked together.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

Blind/ Par-Baking

A blind baked (or par-baked) crust is one that has been partially or fully baked prior to adding the filling. Usually done only on single crust pies, blind baking can help prevent soggy bottoms and ensure that crusts are cooked thoroughly and evenly. To blind bake, start by docking (or poking holes with a fork) the bottom and sides of your chilled pie dough that has been rolled into a pan. Fit a crumpled sheet of parchment paper into the bottom and sides of the dough and fill it with pie weight, dried rice, or dried beans. The weight will prevent steam from bubbling underneath the dough and ensure that the crust remains flat in the pan.

You Need to Know: How to Make Pie Dough. This is a step by step tutorial with photos and videos of how to make, bake, and work with homemade butter pie dough. Learn what fat to use in pie crust, how to make an egg wash, how to crimp a pie crust, how to braid a pie crust lattice, and more tips that make homemade desserts easy. Find all the tips and tricks for great pie crust here on thewoodandspoon.com

More Help on How to Make Pie Dough

We’re nearing the end of this lengthy (but hopefully helpful?) tutorial, so I wanted to wrap things up with a few frequently asked questions. Most of these are internal questions that blaze across my brain when a failed pie attempt has me searching Google for answers or help, but some of these are questions that have been posed me to by readers like you! We’ll end on this note, but be sure to see below for my favorite double crust pie recipe. It’s been tried and true for me for years, the combination of shortening and butter yielding a flaky yet flavorful crust. Give it a try and let me know what you think! Without further ado, here’s some FAQ!

Why is my pie dough sticky? Two possible situations: either it’s not cold enough or you added too much water. Pop it in the fridge for 30 minutes or so to see if that helps!
Why did my pie crust shrink in my pan? Again, it’s probably a hydration issue. Next time, add a little less water and chill the pie crust prior to baking it. I even like to pop crusts in the freezer sometimes!
What kind of rolling pin is best? This is a personal preference thing. I prefer a wooden rolling pin with traditional handles, but you may opt for a French pin or one that is made with marble or plastic! The important thing is keeping that pin floured the whole time you roll out your dough!
Can I use different flours in my pie crust? Sure. The internet is loaded with recipes for people looking to use alternative flours. I don’t have a recipe here that I’d recommend, but I’m sure you’ll find something on the interwebs.
Is a deep-dish pie the same as a standard one? Not typically. On this site, I always specify where a deep-dish pie pan is needed, because they always hold more volume. If you attempt to make a deep-dish pie recipe in a standard pie plate, you’ll wind up with too many ingredients and not enough room. Tread lightly.
So what kind of pie plate is best? Again, this is a preference thing. I live and die by my William-Sonoma Goldtouch Pan, but many other people swear by glass or even ceramic. I will say that glass is helpful when you’re wanting the ensure a crisp, golden bottom- after all, you can look under the pie and see how the cooking is coming!
Do I have to flour or grease my pie plate? Nope, not unless the recipe you’re following specifies to do so.
How can I get a crisp-bottomed pie? Par-baking is a great option for single pie crusts, but I also love to bake my pies closer to the bottom third of the oven. Other recipes may specify to add an egg wash to the bottom of the pie.
How do I know my fruit pie is done? I always look for bubbling fruit in the middle of the pie.
What do I do if my pie crust is too brown before the filling is bubbling? Use a sheet of aluminum foil to gently cover the top. If it’s just the edges getting too dark, make a foil collar to rest around the edge of the pie like a crown.
Where can I learn more about your favorite pie crust? Check out a super old post here!
Now that I know how to make pie dough, what pie do you recommend? For a cream pie, check out my favorite Southern Coconut Cream Pie . For a summer favorite, look no further than this Peach Berry Pie . And for something a little different, try these Raspberry Champagne Pop-Tarts.

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My Favorite Pie Dough

A pie crust equal parts buttery and flaky, lightly golden, and perfectly baked- this is the only recipe for a double pie crust that you’ll ever need.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 1 Double Crust 1x
  • Category: Pastry

Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 ½ cups (420 gm) all purpose flour
  • 3 teaspoons (12 gm) sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon (4 gm) salt
  • 2/3 cup (135 gm) chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into pieces
  • 3/4 cup (11/2 sticks, 170 gm) chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 10 tablespoons (approximately) ice water

Instructions

  1. Give the dry ingredients a whiz in the food processor to combine.
  2. Pulse in the shortening and butter, just until barely evenly dispersed.
  3. Begin adding ice water, 2 tablespoons at a time until moist clumps begin to form.
  4. Remove dough from food processor and separate in two round disks. Wrap in Saran wrap and chill for at least two hours prior to use.
  5. When ready to use, roll out to 1/4″ thickness and line the bottom of a 9″ pie pan. This is enough dough to fill a deep dish pan as well. Prior to baking, brush with an egg wash, if desired. This is done by whisking 1 egg with 1 tablespoon of water and lightly brushing crust prior to use.

Notes

  • This recipe makes a double crust. If you want extra dough for decorating the top, I recommend doubling the recipe and saving leftover crust for a future pie! The dough freezes nicely when wrapped well.
  • Chilling the dough is essential. If your dough gets too warm while you are rolling it out or decorating the top, you may not get as flakey of a crust as you might desire. So work swiftly!
  • Patch up holes or tears in the crust with leftover dough. Even small holes on the bottom of the pie plate can make a burned and sticky mess of your pie and you’re not going to want to waste a drop of this deliciousness!
  • You can easily substitute the shortening for butter and visa versa, however I cannot vouch for any other substitutions. Unless you’re super anti-shortening or anti-butter, I strongly recommend this combination for a buttery, flaky crust.

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can’t wait to see what you’ve made!