Molasses Angel Biscuits

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

Rise and shine and get to baking y’all! Today’s recipe is a stellar weekend baking project: molasses angel biscuits. Made with a bit of yeast and naturally sweetened with the rich flavor of molasses, this Southern-style bread has the dense fluff of a Parker house roll with the flavor of a biscuit. If you’ve never attempted them before, today is your day! Consider this a sign to get baking.

My (Somewhat Brief) Love Affair with Angel Biscuits

Once upon a time, Brett and I got married in a small-ish wedding ceremony at my grandparents’ farm. Although the event was a humble, home-spun affair, we managed to do a few things insanely well. One of those was the food. Our caterer was a childhood friend of Brett’s, and his offerings absolutely ruled both the wedding day and rehearsal dinner. On the eve of our wedding day, we joined a small group of family and friends in my grandparents’ antique car garage for a family style dinner. The dinner began with charcuterie boards (still a newish thing at the time), before we enjoyed short ribs over grits and perfect little angel biscuits. At the time, I didn’t have a clue what angel biscuits were, but, boy- I was about to find out.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

After the honeymoon, I began researching angel biscuits at home. Mac, our caterer, attempted to share his recipe with me, but I could never get them quite right. The goal was a yeast-leavened biscuit, soft and fluffy, flavored with rich molasses and slathered with melted butter. After what felt like a million attempts, I threw in the towel and stuck to the regular biscuits I knew and love. Perhaps angel biscuit baking just wasn’t for me.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

Molasses Angel Biscuits

Fast forward 10 years and hundreds of oven bakes later: I began the hunt again. Just a few weeks ago, I stumbled upon an angel biscuit recipe and decided to give it another go. They were good, but still lacked the molasses flavor I wanted. I tweaked the original recipe, substituting molasses for sugar, decreasing the milk, and adding a bit more baking soda to account for the acidity of the molasses. Finally, a winner- a really, really, good molasses angel biscuit.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

What are Angel Biscuits?

Angel biscuits are often described as a cross between a Parker house roll and biscuit. Whereas normal biscuits rise with the help of baking soda, baking powder, or both, angel biscuits also get the help of yeast. As a result, they require a little extra time to prepare, but the yield is worth it. Fluffy biscuits, less dense and dry from normal ones, with pillowy insides and crispy tops and bottoms. They are, in a word, angelic. Go figure.

How to Make Molasses Angel Biscuits

To make these molasses angel biscuits, we start by dissolving active dry yeast in a bit of warm water. While those two mingle, we stir together the dry ingredients: flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Next, cut in cold butter until incorporated in pea-sized clumps. Stir the milk and molasses with the yeast paste, and add the whole lot of it to the dry ingredients. This dough is pretty wet and requires well-floured hands and work surfaces. Work quickly, avoiding over-kneading the dough, and bring it all together before cutting out rounds of dough.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

The biscuits require an hour-long rise before they are baked. I like to enjoy these molasses angel biscuits fresh from the oven with an extra schmear of butter. Bonus points to you if you decide to make a little molasses butter too! Just add a couple tablespoons of molasses to a stick of room temperature salted butter and cream together. Truly, it’s delicious.

Give these biscuits a try and let me know what you think! Happy Friday, y’all and happy baking!

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

If you like the biscuits you should try:

Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes
Maple Oatmeal Biscuits
Honey Spelt Biscuits
Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits
Gingerbread Cinnamon Rolls

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Molasses Angel Biscuits

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These molasses angel biscuits rise with the help of active dry yeast and are naturally sweetened with the rich flavor of molasses!

  • Author: Kate Wood (Adapted from Irvin Lin)
  • Prep Time: 75
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 15
  • Category: Bread

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons warm water

  • 1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cold and chopped

  • 3/4 cups milk (2% or whole)

  • 3 tablespoons molasses

  • Extra flour for rolling

Instructions

  1. Lightly grease a baking dish or pan with baking spray and set aside.

  2. In a small bowl, measure out the warm (but not HOT) water and sprinkle the yeast over top. Gently stir to combine it into a loose paste. Set aside.

  3. In a large bowl, whisk to combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Use a pastry cutter, the backs of two forks, or your fingers to quickly cut the butter into the dry ingredients, working it in until the butter is evenly distributed and broken down into small pea-sized bits. In a large measuring cup, whisk to combine the milk, molasses, and yeast paste. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients bowl and stir 7-8 times, just until combined into a wet, shaggy dough.

  4. Sprinkle a clean work surface with a bit of all-purpose flour. Dump the dough out onto the floured surface and work the dough into a rectangle. Press the dough gently until an inch thick and fold over top of itself. Repeat this process and press the dough out to 1” thickness again. Use a flour 1-3/4” biscuit cutter to trim out rounds of down and space them 1/4” apart on the greased pan. Collect any remaining dough, bring it together into a pressed-out rectangle, and cut more rounds. Repeat this process until all of the dough has been cut out. Cover the pan of biscuits with plastic wrap or a tea towel, and place in a warm spot in your kitchen to rise for 45 minute- 1 hour. The biscuits are ready when, once gently poked with a finger, the biscuit remains slightly indented without popping back out. Do not let it over-rise.

  5. In the last 20 minutes of your rise time, preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. When the biscuits have properly risen, place them in the preheated oven to bake about 12 minutes or until sturdy to the touch and barely beginning to brown. Remove from the oven and brush with melted butter, if desired.

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