brown butter

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Is it just me, or is it way too easy to come home from vacation straight up exhausted? Brett and I spent this past weekend up north, traveling a few days in Boston and Martha’s Vineyard. It was my first time to the area, and I’m excited to report that both were equally charming in their own unique way. Per custom, I have a new recipe to share with you this week as well as the run down on everything we ate, drank, and saw during our time in the northeast.  Stay tuned for the brown butter pear tart and read on for the who, what, and where details of our trip!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Where We Stayed:

What started as a trip to Martha’s Vineyard turned into a two part vacay: phase one spent enjoying the big city historical scene of Boston and phase two spent relaxing in the off-season quiet of Martha’s Vineyard. After a few recommendations from friends, we opted for a spunky modern hotel option in Boston, The Envoy, and a quaint bed and breakfast on the vineyard, the Hob Knob. Both were well suited to their respective locations and felt right for our time there. I’d definitely recommend both if you’re looking for a sure thing on your next visit!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Ate:

What DIDN’T we eat might be the more appropriate question. This was a non-stop parade of food, fine restaurants, and pastries. I was excited to find many delicious lunch and dinner options in Boston, but found the bakery scene proved to be rather lackluster. There was, however, no shortage of amazing cocktails and pubs, and we also loved checking out the food truck scene at Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Although we arrived in Martha’s Vineyard in what we were told was the last big week before the island shut down for the season, we still found many of the places recommended by friends to be open! Our palates were equally happy to learn that the Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival was taking place while we were there, and Brett and I were lucky enough to snag tickets to the main tasting on Saturday afternoon. Dozens of wine purveyors and chefs from the Northeast flocked to the island to serve up their goods, and it was a ball. There’s nothing like day drinking and bite-sized appetizers to help you make friends in a new place. If you’re ever in the region during the festival, I highly recommend giving it a try! See below for the full list of local restaurants we visited during our time away.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Boston Recommendations:

Fox and the Knife

An enoteca and restaurant by James Beard Award-winning chef Karen Akunowicz. We enjoyed delicious handmade pastas and Italian liquors there.

The Longfellow Bar

A neighborhood bar and restaurant in Cambridge offering shared plates with exciting flavors.

Shojo

Modern Asian cuisine in the heart of Boston’s Chinatown.

Pammy’s

New American bites in a modernized trattoria setting.

Tatte Bakery

With a number of locations across Boston, Tatte offers a variety of delicious baked goods, coffees, and lunch options in a seriously aesthetic atmosphere.

Sofra Bakery

Middle Eastern inspired baked goods. Check out their online schedule for baking classes!

The Food Trucks at Rose Kennedy Greenway

Martha’s Vineyard Recommendations:

Alchemy

Creative New American fare in a classic dining room setting.

The Port Hunter

A raw bar and approachable new American food are offered in this casual setting.

Back Door Donuts

Delicious donuts and baked goods in a carry-out setting.

State Road

New American cuisine in a cozy tavern setting.

Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Did:

Although there’s loads to do in both Boston and Martha’s Vineyard, both areas are spread out in such a way that they weren’t entirely walkable. Luckily, Uber and Lyft were both readily available, and we found it was simple to catch a ride to wherever we wanted to be. Boston is brimming with loads of historical sites and museums, so we spent a good bit of time checking out walking tours and super old buildings. Brett was eager to grab a beer at the Beantown Pub, a bar across the street from Samuel Adams’ gravesite, so that he could “drink a cold Sam Adams while looking at a cold Sam Adams.”( I’ll pause for eye rolling.) Per recommendation from friends, we took a day trip to Cambridge to get a glimpse of Harvard University. The school is spread out all over the city, but it was intriguing just to poke around and eavesdrop on random conversations. The two gentlemen sitting beside me at lunch were having an in depth conversation about hydrogen atoms, and this Dorothy immediately knew she wasn’t in Kansas anymore.

Although the landscape of Martha’s Vineyard is primarily suited for summertime activities, I found the chilly, autumnal version of the island peaceful and charming. We spent most of our time nosing through Mom and Pop stores in downtown Edgartown and taking in the coastal views. If you’re at all interested in fishing or water sports, I’d highly recommend checking out boat rentals as that would be a great way to spend a weekend there.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Let me start by saying that I adore this tart. Months ago, I ran across a photo of a beautiful layered pear pie. It had, what appeared to be, a phyllo crust filled with thin slices of pears overlapping on one another in a concentric fashion. The crust was browned and flaked and the filling was speckled with fresh pomegranate seeds. Although I wasn’t able to find a recipe for the creation, I decided I needed to make a dessert with a similar look. The brainstorming began.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Here’s what I ended up with: a brown butter pear tart. A simple, press-in sweet pastry dough is filled with a thin layer of brown butter custard and a mountain of fresh sliced red Anjou pears. Upon baking, the pears release their juice and soften, the flavors from the fruit quietly melting into the custard underneath it. The pastry crust, albeit simple, is the perfect vehicle for the subtle flavors, as it offers texture and sweetness while still allowing the filling to sing.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart features Kerrygold unsalted butter in two fashions: first, cold chunks of butter are cut into the dry ingredients to create a tender and mildly buttery shell. The dough for the tart crust is so ridiculously delicious that I found myself eating almost as much as I pressed into the pan. Kerrygold butter is also found throughout the brown butter custard. If you need a few pointers on browning butter, please check out my how-to post here.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart is without a doubt one of the most unassuming and delightful holiday desserts I’ve made in a long time. Although we’re still a couple of days away from the holiday season, it’s never too early to get planning, and I really think you need to consider this tart in the lineup of Thanksgiving and Christmas treats. Give it a try and let me know what you think! Many thanks to Kerrygold for sponsoring this post, and thanks to you all for supporting brands that make Wood & Spoon possible. Happy baking!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

 

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Brown Butter Pear Tart

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter peat tart has a sweet pastry crust, a brown butter custard, and a layered pear filling.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pastry dough:

  • 11/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup cold unsalted butter
  • 1 large egg yolk, white reserved
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons of ice water, plus more as needed

For the filling:

  • ½ cup unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 23 large red pears, halved, cored, and sliced in 1/8” slices
  • Pomegranate seeds, about ½ cup
  • Toasted walnuts, if desired

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Pulse in the butter until it resembles pea-sized crumbs. Don’t over-process. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolkd and vanilla. Pulse the egg yolk mixture into the flour just until combined. Add the water and pulse to combine. Don’t process it to the point of it coming together into a dough. The mixture should still be shaggy but should clump together when you squeeze a bit of the mixture together in between your fingers. If it’s still dry add another teaspoon or so of ice water and then pulse to combine. Dump the mixture out onto a clean work surface and bring the dough together into a ball. Flatten it out into a disk, wrap it is plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes but preferably 2 hours.
  2. When ready to prepare your pie, roll the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Roll out the dough to fit into a 9” tart pan with a removable bottom. The dough should be about 2” larger than the pan on all sides. Roll the dough onto your lightly floured rolling pin and gently unroll it into your tart pan. Gently fit the dough into the edges of your pan and use a paring knife or kitchen scissors to trim any dough that extends over 1” the lip of the pan. Press the dough gently into the sides of the pan and use any leftover dough to reinforce the sides where needed. Put the pan in the freezer to set up for 30 minutes while you preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  3. When ready to bake, prick the bottom of the tart dough with a fork a few times. Use a sheet of parchment to line the pastry dough inside the pan and f ill the tart pan with pie weights (you can also use dried beans or dried rice). Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes then remove the parchment and weights from the tart pan. Gently brush the crust with a thin layer of the egg white and bake for 5 more minutes. In the meantime, prep your filling.
  4. Cube the butter and add to a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan to being browning it. Place the pan on medium heat and stir gently with a whisk regularly to allow the butter to melt evenly. Once melted, keep stirring regularly to allow the butter to cook, sizzle, and foam evenly. You’ll begin to notice golden flecks appearing at the bottom of the pan and the butter will become fragrant. When there are amber-colored flecks throughout the butter mixture your butter is browned! Don’t let it burn! Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into a heat-safe mixing bowl. Stir in the sugar. Stir in the egg and vanilla extract and then fold in the flour. Pour the mixture into the par-baked pastry shell and spread to even it out. Cover the filling in a layer of fanned pear slices. Keep the slices in tight on one another to prevent the filling from baking up over on top of them too much. Bake in the preheated oven for an additional 35-40 minutes or until the crust is golden and the filling it cooked underneath. The pears shouldn’t jiggle on top of the pie when the pie is done. Allow to cool serve with a sprinkle pomegranate seeds and toasted walnuts. Enjoy!

Boston

Is it just me, or is it way too easy to come home from vacation straight-up exhausted? Brett and I spent this past weekend up north, traveling a few days through Boston and Martha’s Vineyard. It was my first time to the area, and I’m excited to report that both were equally charming in their own unique way. Per custom, I have a new recipe to share with you this week as well as the run down on everything we ate, drank, and saw during our time in the northeast.  Stay tuned for the brown butter pear tart and read on for the who, what, and where details of our trip!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Where We Stayed:

What started as a trip to Martha’s Vineyard turned into a two part vacay: phase one spent enjoying the big city historical scene of Boston and phase two spent relaxing in the off-season quiet of Martha’s Vineyard. After a few recommendations from friends, we opted for a spunky modern hotel option in Boston, The Envoy, and a quaint bed and breakfast on the vineyard, the Hob Knob. Both were well suited to their respective locations and felt right for our time there. I’d definitely recommend both if you’re looking for a sure thing on your next visit!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Ate:

What DIDN’T we eat might be the more appropriate question. This was a non-stop parade of food, fine restaurants, and pastries. I was excited to find tons of delicious lunch and dinner options in Boston, as well as desserts galore. There was no shortage of amazing cocktails and pubs, and we also loved checking out the food truck scene at Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Although we arrived in Martha’s Vineyard in what we were told was the last big week before the island shut down for the season, we still found many of the places recommended by friends to be open! Our palates were equally happy to learn that the Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival was taking place while we were there, and Brett and I were lucky enough to snag tickets to the main tasting on Saturday afternoon. Dozens of wine purveyors and chefs from the Northeast flocked to the island to serve up their goods, and it was a ball. There’s nothing like day drinking and bite-sized appetizers to help you make friends in a new place. If you’re ever in the region during the festival, I highly recommend giving it a try! See below for the full list of local restaurants we visited during our time away.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Boston Recommendations:

Fox and the Knife
An enoteca and restaurant by James Beard Award-winning chef Karen Akunowicz. We enjoyed delicious handmade pastas and Italian liquors there.
The Longfellow Bar
A neighborhood bar and restaurant in Cambridge offering shared plates with exciting flavors.
Shojo
Modern Asian cuisine in the heart of Boston’s Chinatown.
Pammy’s
New American bites in a modernized trattoria setting.
Tatte Bakery
With a number of locations across Boston, Tatte offers a variety of delicious baked goods, coffees, and lunch options in a seriously aesthetic atmosphere.
Sofra Bakery
Middle Eastern inspired baked goods. Check out their online schedule for baking classes!
Flour Baker and Cafe
This chain of bakeries is run by the extraordinary Joanne Change- a must visit!
The Food Trucks at Rose Kennedy Greenway

Martha’s Vineyard Recommendations:

Alchemy
Creative New American fare in a classic dining room setting.
The Port Hunter
A raw bar and approachable new American food are offered in this casual setting.
Back Door Donuts
Delicious donuts and baked goods in a carry-out setting.
State Road
New American cuisine in a cozy tavern setting.
Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Did:

Although there’s loads to do in both Boston and Martha’s Vineyard, both areas are spread out in such a way that they weren’t entirely walkable. Luckily, Uber and Lyft were both readily available, and we found it was simple to catch a ride to wherever we wanted to be. Boston is brimming with loads of historical sites and museums, so we spent a good bit of time checking out walking tours and super old buildings. Brett was eager to grab a beer at the Beantown Pub, a bar across the street from Samuel Adams’ gravesite, so that he could “drink a cold Sam Adams while looking at a cold Sam Adams.”( I’ll pause for eye rolling.) Per recommendation from friends, we took a day trip to Cambridge to get a glimpse of Harvard University. The school is spread out all over the city, but it was intriguing just to poke around and eavesdrop on random conversations. The two gentlemen sitting beside me at lunch were having an in depth conversation about hydrogen atoms, and this Dorothy immediately knew she wasn’t in Kansas anymore.

Although the landscape of Martha’s Vineyard is primarily suited for summertime activities, I found the chilly, autumnal version of the island peaceful and charming. We spent most of our time nosing through Mom and Pop stores in downtown Edgartown and taking in the coastal views. If you’re at all interested in fishing or water sports, I’d highly recommend checking out boat rentals as that would be a great way to spend a weekend there.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Let me start by saying that I adore this tart. Months ago, I ran across a photo of a beautiful layered pear pie. It had, what appeared to be, a phyllo crust filled with thin slices of pears overlapping on one another in a concentric fashion. The crust was browned and flaked and the filling was speckled with fresh pomegranate seeds. Although I wasn’t able to find a recipe for the creation, I decided I needed to make a dessert with a similar look. The brainstorming began.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Here’s what I ended up with: a brown butter pear tart. A simple, press-in sweet pastry dough is filled with a thin layer of brown butter custard and a mountain of fresh sliced red Anjou pears. Upon baking, the pears release their juice and soften, the flavors from the fruit quietly melting into the custard underneath it. The pastry crust, albeit simple, is the perfect vehicle for the subtle flavors, as it offers texture and sweetness while still allowing the filling to sing.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart features Kerrygold unsalted butter in two fashions: first, cold chunks of butter are cut into the dry ingredients to create a tender and mildly buttery shell. The dough for the tart crust is so ridiculously delicious that I found myself eating almost as much as I pressed into the pan. Kerrygold butter is also found throughout the brown butter custard. If you need a few pointers on browning butter, please check out my how-to post here.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart is without a doubt one of the most unassuming and delightful holiday desserts I’ve made in a long time. Although we’re still a couple of days away from the holiday season, it’s never too early to get planning, and I really think you need to consider this tart in the lineup of Thanksgiving and Christmas treats. Give it a try and let me know what you think! Many thanks to Kerrygold for sponsoring this post, and thanks to you all for supporting brands that make Wood & Spoon possible. Happy baking!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Print

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter peat tart has a sweet pastry crust, a brown butter custard, and a layered pear filling.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pastry dough:

  • 11/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup cold unsalted butter
  • 1 large egg yolk, white reserved
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons of ice water, plus more as needed

For the filling:

  • ½ cup unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 23 large red pears, halved, cored, and sliced in 1/8” slices
  • Pomegranate seeds, about ½ cup
  • Toasted walnuts, if desired

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Pulse in the butter until it resembles pea-sized crumbs. Don’t over-process. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolkd and vanilla. Pulse the egg yolk mixture into the flour just until combined. Add the water and pulse to combine. Don’t process it to the point of it coming together into a dough. The mixture should still be shaggy but should clump together when you squeeze a bit of the mixture together in between your fingers. If it’s still dry add another teaspoon or so of ice water and then pulse to combine. Dump the mixture out onto a clean work surface and bring the dough together into a ball. Flatten it out into a disk, wrap it is plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes but preferably 2 hours.
  2. When ready to prepare your pie, roll the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Roll out the dough to fit into a 9” tart pan with a removable bottom. The dough should be about 2” larger than the pan on all sides. Roll the dough onto your lightly floured rolling pin and gently unroll it into your tart pan. Gently fit the dough into the edges of your pan and use a paring knife or kitchen scissors to trim any dough that extends over 1” the lip of the pan. Press the dough gently into the sides of the pan and use any leftover dough to reinforce the sides where needed. Put the pan in the freezer to set up for 30 minutes while you preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  3. When ready to bake, prick the bottom of the tart dough with a fork a few times. Use a sheet of parchment to line the pastry dough inside the pan and f ill the tart pan with pie weights (you can also use dried beans or dried rice). Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes then remove the parchment and weights from the tart pan. Gently brush the crust with a thin layer of the egg white and bake for 5 more minutes. In the meantime, prep your filling.
  4. Cube the butter and add to a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan to being browning it. Place the pan on medium heat and stir gently with a whisk regularly to allow the butter to melt evenly. Once melted, keep stirring regularly to allow the butter to cook, sizzle, and foam evenly. You’ll begin to notice golden flecks appearing at the bottom of the pan and the butter will become fragrant. When there are amber-colored flecks throughout the butter mixture your butter is browned! Don’t let it burn! Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into a heat-safe mixing bowl. Stir in the sugar. Stir in the egg and vanilla extract and then fold in the flour. Pour the mixture into the par-baked pastry shell and spread to even it out. Cover the filling in a layer of fanned pear slices. Keep the slices in tight on one another to prevent the filling from baking up over on top of them too much. Bake in the preheated oven for an additional 35-40 minutes or until the crust is golden and the filling it cooked underneath. The pears shouldn’t jiggle on top of the pie when the pie is done. Allow to cool serve with a sprinkle pomegranate seeds and toasted walnuts. Enjoy!

Honey Peach Pie

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

Another week, another dessert. That’s how we do things around here. If you live anywhere near the South, you know our peach season took a mini hit this year, but even so, the summer fruit favorite is beginning to pop up everywhere in all it’s juicy, fuzz-covered glory. To celebrate the unofficial fruit of the South (I just declared this on my own, BTW), we’re making this honey peach pie. Let’s chat the ins and outs.

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

For starters, we have an all-butter pie crust. While my usual pie dough has a smidge of shortening in it, I absolutely LOVE using an all-butter crust when I want extra-rich flavor. This crust does not disappoint. Filled with Kerrygold butter and a smidge of sugar and salt, this crust is a terrific vehicle for a pie fillings of fresh peaches, brown sugar, and… honey caramel? Yep, there’s a honey caramel in here. This is a recipe adapted from Jeni Britton Bauer’s honey butterscotch sauce that she uses to top her ice cream, and it is divine. The filling truly sings of honey here, so be sure to use a variety that you really enjoy the flavor of. To finish things off, we have a brown butter crumble. You know I’ll top just about anything with crumble and will jump at the chance to brown butter, so this pie topping is actually an all-time fave of mine.

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

To make this honey peach pie, we start by prepping all of the elements of the pie. I like to begin by making my pie dough so that it can chill while I prep the other ingredients. You can even make the dough up to a week in advance! Next, whip up the honey caramel sauce so that it can chill in the fridge as well, and then finish it all off by making the brown butter crumble. Once the prep work has been done, you take a few hours or even a day or two off before actually assembling the pie!

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

When you’re ready to bake your honey peach pie, start by filling a 9-10″ tart pan with a removable bottom with the pie crust. I like to roll my crust out several inches larger than the diameter of the tin on a floured surface and then roll the dough back onto my floured rolling pin. From there, simply unroll the dough into the pan and then trim the edges and crimp as desired. Toss the sliced peaches with the dry ingredients and immediately place in the pan with the drizzle of honey caramel. Top with the crumble and brush the crust with a beaten egg. This honey peach pie takes about 45 minutes to bake and another couple of hours to set, so be patient for best results.

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

When you’re ready to serve this summer treat, make sure you have some ice cream or whipped cream on hand. I opted to top the whole things with extra slices of peaches and blueberries, but this was totally for aesthetic purposes. The tart is loaded with fruit and needs no further attention, just a few friends with empty forks so that you can dive right into this fruity stunner.

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

I’m sharing today’s recipe in collaboration with my favorite friends at Kerrygold. Both in the all-butter pie crust and brown butter crumble, quality butter is essential for this pie, so I trust Kerrygold to provide excellent product I can trust! Their butter has slightly lower water content than the average stick you’ll find at the grocery store which means more flake to every bite. Trust me on this one. As always, thank you for supporting brands that make Wood & Spoon possible and thank you for reading along! Happy Tuesday and Happy Baking!

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this honey peach pie you should check out:

Peach Lattice Pie

Peaches and Cream Biscuits

Peach Crumb Muffins

Peach Semifreddo

 

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Honey Peach Pie

Honey Peach Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an all butter pie crust filled with a honey caramel and fresh peaches and topped with a brown butter crumble. This pie bakes up scented with honey and juicy peaches and the crust and crumble add a bit of salt to offset the sweet. This is a great summer recipe to use fresh produce and make homemade pie tarts. Learn more about this dessert for a crowd at thewoodandspoon.com

This honey peach pie has an all-butter crust, a honey caramel and peach filling, and a brown butter crumble topping!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 45
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 180
  • Yield: 1 Pie 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 11/4 cups (175 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (115 gm) unsalted butter, cold
  • 1 cup ice water
  • 1 tablespoon bourbon

For the honey caramel filling (Adapted from Jeni Britton Bauer):

  • 1 cup (200 gm) sugar
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 11/4 cup (300 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • 4 tablespoons (55 gm) unsalted butter
  • Pinch of salt

For the brown butter crumble:

  • 6 tablespoons (85 gm) unsalted butter
  • ½ cup (100 gm) brown sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (140 gm) all-purpose flour

For the filling:

  • 1 egg
  • 11/2 pounds of ripe peaches
  • 11/2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • Pinch of salt

Instructions

To prepare the crust:

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Use a pastry cutter or the backs of two forks to cut in the butter until pea-sized clumps exist throughout. Add the bourbon to the water and drizzle in a 1/3 cup of the mixture (sans ice) and use a fork to bring the dough together. Continue adding small bits of water until the mixture comes together enough for the dough to pull away from the bowl. The dough should be smooth- not sticky or crumble. Try not to overwork it. Pat the dough into a small disk, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill in the fridge at least two hours.

To prepare the honey caramel filling:

  1. Combine the honey and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. Stop stirring and continue cooking, stirring occasionally. As the mixture heats it will foam, make big clear bubbles, and then make tighter fine bubbles. Continue swirling the pan occasionally and watch as the caramel begins to slowly darken. Once the center has slightly darkened to a brownish shade, remove from heat immediately and carefully and slowly drizzle in the cream, stirring all the while. Add the butter and salt and stir until melted and combined. Place the mixture in a heat-proof bowl to chill in the fridge.

To prepare the brown butter crumble:

  1. In a small saucepan, melt the butter over medium-low heat stirring regularly. Continue stirring as you brown the butter. It will sizzle, foam, and then you’ll see small golden specks forming around the bottom and sides of the pan. Continue stirring to prevent the butter from burning until the mixture is fairly golden and smells deliciously nutty. Remove from heat immediately to a heat-safe bowl. Add the brown sugar, cinnamon and salt and stir to combine. Add the flour and fold until the mixture forms large clumps. Place the mixture in the fridge to chill slightly while you assemble your pie.

To prepare the pie:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Roll the dough out on a floured surface using a floured rolling pin until it is 2” larger than your 9” tart pan with a removable bottom on all sides. Roll the dough back onto your rolling pin and unroll it into the tart pan. Carefully press the dough into the corners of the pan and trim off any excess around the edges leaving a 1” overhang on all sides. Fold the edges into the tart pan to create a thicker crust that extends about ¼” over the sides of the pan. Crack the egg into a bowl and, without breaking the yolk, use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of egg white all over the dough on the bottom and sides of the pan. Place the crust in the freezer to set for 15 minutes.
  2. In the meantime, peel and core your peaches and slice them into ¾” slices. Toss with the cornstarch, brown sugar, and salt. Pour the filling into the prepared tart pan. Pour 1 cup of the of the honey caramel over the peaches. You can slightly rewarm to liquid consistency as needed. Sprinkle the brown butter crumble on top.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes and then decrease the heat to 350. Bake for an additional 40-45 minutes or until the pie is set, golden, and bubbling under the crust. Allow to cool for 2-3 hours prior to cutting. Serve with ice cream or whipped cream.

Pumpkin Danishes

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So you might recall that last weekend was my birthday. We spent Friday and Saturday in Birmingham with friends and family, but the actual day-of was rather standard procedure. Leading up to the day of, Aimee became fixated on preparing me breakfast in bed, and much to her delight, Brett was more than willing to help facilitate.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I wish I had a picture of her face as she tiptoed into my room that morning. Aimee had filled her tiny plastic tea party tray with miniature cups of orange juice and unicorn cereal, Mickey Mouse waffles and French toast sticks. There were cinnamon rolls and fresh coffee, even a couple of cards and those neon colored daisies that they sell at the grocery store. The whole operation just screamed “ AIMEE DID THIS,” and honestly it was one of the sweetest moments of my motherhood thus far.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

In that moment it was clear that even from a young age humans experience innate joy from celebrating the people they love. Aimee, my four year old who can’t even reach the toaster, took such delight in having a hand  in preparing something that she thought would be so special to me. She celebrated me how she would have wanted to be celebrated, and there’s so much feeling and hormonal heart swelling attached to that memory that I could cry just thinking about it. The breakfast itself was special, yes, but it was really nothing more than frozen waffles. The fun in it all for her was being able to share in something that felt out of the ordinary and celebratory. Even my four year old has figured out that it’s good to celebrate the people you love.

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I adore these pumpkin danishes. They’re delicious, equal parts buttery and sweet, but they’re definitely not a run-of-the-mill breakfast food. Danishes take time and tons of intentionality. They’re not something you just whip up on a whim, and honestly, that’s kinda what I like about them. I appreciate how special they feel. I love that they’ve got more gusto than a breakfast bar or bowl of cereal. These pumpkin danishes are a dish that says, “Hey! I love you! Let’s celebrate.”

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you’ve hung out around this block long enough, you know about the danishes we’ve done in the past. The dough take time and patience, but once you understand the concept of folding and layering the dough, you’re almost all of the way there. For these pumpkin danishes, we utilize those same dough-making methods and then cut, fold, and fill them to create a cute little 3 bite treat. The pastry is 90% of the work and the filling is really simple, but I also threw in a brown butter glaze that’s really unnecessary. We’re just going all-out over here, okay?

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

The trickiest part of these pumpkin danishes is the shaping of the pastry. In the oven, the pastry will want to unfold and leave an angled corner hanging out on the edge of the danish. Instead, be sure to keep your dough cold and to press the pastry in tight when you shape them. Because the pumpkin filling has egg in it, it does tend to “grow” in the oven. To combat this, I took a cue from Yossy Arefi and doubled filled each one. I filled a little, baked the pastry, filled a little more, and did a final bake. Kinda tedious and really only necessary from an aesthetic standpoint, so if you don’t mind messy pastries you can skip this step. 

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

I hope you find a reason to celebrate with these pumpkin danishes ASAP. There’s lots of happy to tap into around us if we just take the time to recognize and love on it. Happy Thursday and happy baking!

If you like these pumpkin danishes you should check out:

Brown Sugar Danishes

Braided Breakfast Danish

Swirled Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Pumpkin Pecan Tart

Pecan Apple Dutch Baby

 

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Pumpkin Danishes

Pumpkin Danishes Recipe by Wood and Spoon. These are fluffy buttery pastries with a simple pumpkin filling and a brown butter glaze. Each danish is small and each batch makes enough to share with a crowd. These are flavored with fall spices and make a really special autumn breakfast baked good. Find the recipe and how to for these danishes on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

These pumpkin danishes include a buttery pastry dough and a pumpkin spice filling. There’s an optional brown butter glaze if you’re feeling super fancy.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 240
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 4 hours 45 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
Scale

Ingredients

For the dough (Adapted from Samantha Seneviratne:

  • 1 ½ cups bread flour, plus more for rolling dough
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 14 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup cold whole milk

For the filling:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened but still cold
  • ½ cup canned pumpkin puree
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 egg, divided
  • ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • Pinch of salt

For the brown butter glaze (optional):

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon milk

Instructions

To prepare the dough:

  1. Combine the flour, granulated sugar, yeast and salt in a food processor. Add butter and pulse to combine until butter is distributed in pea-sized pieces throughout the flour. Put the flour mixture in a medium bowl.
  2. In a separate, small bowl, whisk the egg and milk with 2 tablespoons of water. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Fold the mixture until the liquid is evenly distributed, being careful to not overwork the dough. Dump the contents of the bowl out on to a lightly floured surface and pat into a rectangle. Chill for at least 3 hours, and up to 2 days.
  3. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to an 8-by-15-inch rectangle. Fold the dough in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat the rolling and folding process. Dusting with flour as needed to prevent sticking, rotate, roll, and fold a final time, ending with a small, rectangular piece of dough. Wrap the dough in Saran wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  4. Repeat the entire rolling and folding process one more time. You will have rolled and folded the dough six times. If the dough becomes loose or tacky, place in the fridge to rest for a bit. Wrap the dough and place in the fridge for 2 hours or up to overnight.
  5. To prepare the danishes:
  6. In a large bowl, cream the cream cheese, pumpkin, brown sugar, and sugar on medium speed just until smooth. Break the egg yolk and spoon most of it into the mixture, leaving some behind in a small bowl. Add the pumpkin pie spice and salt to the mixture and stir to combine. Pour the filling into a piping bag or a plastic bag with the corner snipped off. If your filling is loose, place it in the fridge while you prep your pastry.
  7.  
  8. Roll out the dough on a floured surface into a roughly 10”x13” rectangle. Trim ¼” off of each side to straighten edges and cut the dough into 12 equal sized squares (I usually make 3 rows of 4 squares.) Beat the remainder of the egg and brush a dab of it on the four corners of each square of dough. Fold each corner in to the center and press down firmly (but without pushing your finger through the dough!) Transfer each one to a parchment lined sheet pan and cover with a sheet of plastic wrap to rise and puff for about an hour or so. The dough should barely start to spring back when you touch it when it’s ready.
  9. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. If the centers of your pastries have risen a ton you can push down on the centers again. Brush the pastries with the thin layer of the reserved egg. Pipe ½ tablespoon of filling in the center of each one, reserving the additional filling.  Bake in the preheated oven for about 10 minutes and then decrease the temp to 375. You’ll notice that the pastries will have risen quite a bit and likely displaced a lot of the filling- don’t worry. We anticipated this. Quickly and carefully remove the pan from the oven and pipe an additional ½ tablespoon of filling on top. You can use the back of a spoon to move it around to cover the old filing a bit if you’d like. Continue baking at 375 for an additional 8-10 minutes or until the pastries are golden brown. Remove from oven to cool.

To prepare the glaze (optional):

  1. Cook the butter over medium heat on the stove until melted. Continue cooking, stirring all the while, until the butter has begun to brown and smells nutty. Remove from heat and immediately whisk in the powdered sugar and milk. Allow it to cool to drizzle consistency before glazing the pastries.

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans. These are buttery French cookies filled with booze, butter, and topped with decadent rich bourbon ganache. Each little treat is fluffy, like a cake meets cookie and it topped with yummy toppings. These make terrific fall treats for cocktail parties or gifts. These traditional bakes are sweet and elegant and a fun treat to learn how to make! Learn more on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood!

It’s no surprise that I like desserts.

I like cakes with buttery icing and cookies that leave your fingers gooey with chocolate. I like golden-crusted pies with sweet, bubbling insides. I like drippy ice cream cones, eating dough off the beaters, and pastries that leave flakes all over the kitchen, but there’s still one thing that’s sweeter than all of the treats in the world.

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans. These are buttery French cookies filled with booze, butter, and topped with decadent rich bourbon ganache. Each little treat is fluffy, like a cake meets cookie and it topped with yummy toppings. These make terrific fall treats for cocktail parties or gifts. These traditional bakes are sweet and elegant and a fun treat to learn how to make! Learn more on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood!

In my world, it’s seeing little eyes peer over the edge of the counter. It’s the little hands that paw at the back of my apron, begging for a handful of marshmallows or chocolate chips. It’s kissing pairs of  cinnamon sugar coated lips and the look of joyful surprise on those faces when they come home to the smell of fresh baked cookies or loaves of bread. 

Just like with anything else we might partake in, the food we make in our kitchens is only as special as the people we’re sharing it with. So if you needed a reminder today to bake something on behalf of your neighbor or your boyfriend or your Nana who lives 300 miles away, this is it. Bake for other people- it tastes better that way.

These little brown butter bourbon madeleines are the cutest. They’re rich and satisfying despite being only a bite or two, and every single morsel is loaded with flavor- first butter and then bourbon, followed by rich chocolate and pecans. These treats are entirely decadent to enjoy, plus just look at them. They’re adorable. Who wouldn’t want to dive into these?

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans. These are buttery French cookies filled with booze, butter, and topped with decadent rich bourbon ganache. Each little treat is fluffy, like a cake meets cookie and it topped with yummy toppings. These make terrific fall treats for cocktail parties or gifts. These traditional bakes are sweet and elegant and a fun treat to learn how to make! Learn more on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood!

Truthfully, I’ve not made a ton of madeleines before these brown butter bourbon madeleines. I only invested in a pan (this one!) about a year ago and have since dabbled with recipes and how-to’s that I’ve found on the internet. My first few attempts were good, but what made me settle on these brown butter bourbon madeleines is that every single flavor here is elevated in a really special way. Madeleines are already known for their buttery flavor, and here, the brown butter is the star. We add bourbon for a subtle warmth and caramel flavor, and then we dip the whole thing in a bourbon ganache that is ultra boozy and screams “CHOCOLATE!” Pecans seemed like a natural fit here too, so I thought, “Why not?” 

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans. These are buttery French cookies filled with booze, butter, and topped with decadent rich bourbon ganache. Each little treat is fluffy, like a cake meets cookie and it topped with yummy toppings. These make terrific fall treats for cocktail parties or gifts. These traditional bakes are sweet and elegant and a fun treat to learn how to make! Learn more on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood!

If you’ve never made madeleines before, here’s a few ins and outs you’ll want to take note of:

First, a madeleine pan is kinda essential, but not a deal breaker. Yes, I hear you, you don’t want another random pan that only suits one purpose. I get it. Feel free to try this exact recipe in a mini muffin tin. You’ll miss out on the pretty shell shape, but I’ve tried it and they still make for a yummy treat. Second, resting your batter here serves a purpose but we can work around it. Allowing the batter to chill in the fridge for a few hours helps to ensure your madeleines puff and rise to create that signature hump in the middle (click here for more on that), but you can totally skip that too if you’d prefer. They’ll still puff up some. Third: madeleines are loaded with butter and are best eaten the day they’re prepared. They’ll still taste delicious on day two, but they’re really meant to be enjoyed nearly fresh from the oven. Not that they’d stick around that long anyways. 

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans. These are buttery French cookies filled with booze, butter, and topped with decadent rich bourbon ganache. Each little treat is fluffy, like a cake meets cookie and it topped with yummy toppings. These make terrific fall treats for cocktail parties or gifts. These traditional bakes are sweet and elegant and a fun treat to learn how to make! Learn more on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood!

If you’re a little unsure on browning butter, don’t worry- I’ve got you covered with a tutorial here. Not sure about ganache? Got you covered on that too. The ganache on these brown butter bourbon madeleines isn’t 100% necessary, but I think that added element contributes loads of flavor and makes these little guys over the top. If you’d rather keep them plain Jane, a simple sprinkle of confectioner’s sugar would do nicely too. Your choice.

Give these brown butter bourbon madeleines a try and let me know what you think! Have a great Tuesday and cheers to you!

If you like these brown butter bourbon madeleines you should try:

Derby Pie Cookies

Pecan Toffee Blondies

Derby Pie Bars

Candied Walnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Brown Butter Blondies: Two Ways

 

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Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans

Brown Butter Bourbon Madeleines with Dark Chocolate Ganache and Pecans. These are buttery French cookies filled with booze, butter, and topped with decadent rich bourbon ganache. Each little treat is fluffy, like a cake meets cookie and it topped with yummy toppings. These make terrific fall treats for cocktail parties or gifts. These traditional bakes are sweet and elegant and a fun treat to learn how to make! Learn more on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood!

These brown butter bourbon madeleines are rich and buttery with a dark chocolate bourbon ganache and a sprinkle of toasted pecans.

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 18 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the madeleines:

  • 7 tablespoons (100 gm) unsalted butter, plus more for buttering the pan
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup (70 gm) sugar
  • 11/2 tablespoons bourbon
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ cup (70 gm) all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

For the topping:

  • ½ cup (120 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • 4 ounces chopped dark chocolate (I use 60-70% cocoa baking bars)
  • 1 tablespoon bourbon
  • ½ cup (55 gm) finely chopped toasted pecans

Instructions

To make the madeleines:

  1. Place the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat and brown it. Allow the butter to melt completely and the continue cooking, stirring the whole time, until golden flecks appear at the bottom of the pan and the mixture begins to smell warm and nutty. Do not burn the butter. Remove the mixture from heat and pour immediately into a small bowl.
  2. In a large bowl, beat together the eggs and sugar until pale and slightly thickened, about 2-3 minutes. Add the bourbon and vanilla extract and stir to combine. Add the flour and salt and fold to combine. Add the browned butter and fold the mixture just until combined. Cover the bowl and place it in the fridge to chill for 2 hours or overnight.
  3. When ready to make, preheat the oven to 375 degrees and melt 2 tablespoons of butter to liberally grease a madeleine pan. Spoon 1 tablespoons of batter into each madeleine pan and then bake in the preheated oven for about 13 minutes, or until the tops are puffed and the edges and bottom of each madeleine is golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool while you make your ganache.

To finish your madeleines:

  1. Warm the heavy whipping cream over the stove or in the microwave just until it’s about to boil. Remove from heat and then pour over the dark chocolate in a medium-sized bowl. Allow it to rest for 3-4 minutes. Whisk the warm cream and chocolate together until smooth. If small chunks of chocolate remain, place back in the microwave for 20 second increments until it is smooth. Stir in the bourbon.
  2. Dip each madeleine in the ganache and then sprinkle with/dip in pecans. Set the madeleines aside on a sheet of parchment or wax paper to set. Madeleines are best eaten the day they are prepared but can be saved overnight if needed.

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Happy Tuesday from my little corner of the world to you!

Here in Selma, life is busy and full with back to school activities and the onset of football season. Of course we’re still in full-on house building mode, and although I’m sure we are still getting a little closer everyday, this truly feels like the never-ending project. In an effort to not get stir-crazy in the process, I’ve been baking up a storm.

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Lucky for me, we are knee-deep in cookbook season! Autumn months are prime time for new cookbook releases, so keep your eyes peeled over the coming months for recipes that I’ll be sharing from some of my new favorite reads. Up first is this recipe for brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars, fresh from my sweet friend Rebecca’s first release, “The Cookie Book“!

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

I first met Rebecca at last year’s Saveur Blog Awards, but I became familiar with her long before that. Rebecca writes a hilarious, sugar-coated blog that I frequent for recipes and inspiration, and it was a dream to meet an online friend in real life. She thrives on creating accessible recipes that home bakers actually want to make, and her book is no exception. “The Cookie Book” is filled with tons of recipes that I can’t wait to dive right into.

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

These brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars are as simple as they are decadent. Rich and caramel-y muscovado sugar (like the sexy cousin of plain, old-fashioned brown sugar) combines with my all-time favorite ingredient, brown butter, to create a sweet and salty chocolate chip cookie bar that is to die for. I only wish I had thought of it myself.

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

To make these brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars, we start with browning butter. For a how-to on that, be sure to check out my tutorial here. Brown butter is stirred into the blend of sugars before eggs, milk, and vanilla are added to the mix. Next come the dry ingredients, followed by a boat-load of chopped dark chocolate. Spread the dough into a prepared baking dish and bake away until the bars are golden and set. Rebecca recommends finishing off these brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars with a heavy hand of salt, and I couldn’t agree more.

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

These little treats would make a wonderful addition to your fall tailgates, dinner parties, and afternoon snacks. We have been munching on them since I discovered the recipe a week ago, and I am not mad about it. Give Rebecca’s book a looksie here and try on these brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars for size. I have a feeling they’re all the push you’ll need to spring for the book. Happy Tuesday and Happy Baking, y’all!

If you like these brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars you should try:

Brown Butter Blondies: Two Ways

Brookies (Brownie Cookie Bars)

Butterscotch Blondies

Pecan Toffee Blondies

Derby Pie Cookies

 

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Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars

Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chunk Cookie Bars Recipe by wood and Spoon blog. This is a recipe from displaced housewife new book. Chewy, sweet and salty blondies made with rich caramel tasting sugar and dark chocolate. Sea salt finishes these bars that make great dessert, tailgate and party snacks, or late night treats. Find the simple how-to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

The brown butter muscovado chocolate chip cookie bars are sweet and salty, rich dessert bars that will take your average after-dinner treats and snacks to the next level. Try this recipe from Rebecca Firth today!

  • Author: Rebecca Firth
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 35
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 16 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (115 gm) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup (210 gm) dark muscovado sugar, packed
  • 1/2 cup (96 gm) sugar
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) sunflower seed oil or other neutral oil
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 egg yolk, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons milk, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 11/2 cups (205 gm) bread flour
  • 11/2 cups (205 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 cups (180 gm) dark chocolate, chopped
  • Sea salt flakes for dusting on top, optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Grease an 8×11″ casserole dish and line with parchment paper, letting the excess fall over the sides.
  2. Put the butter in a medium saucepan and melt over medium heat. Once melted, crack up the heat to medium high. Continue stirring and look for small golden bits that will start to settle on the bottom of the pan. It will smell deliciously nutty and caramel-y. This should take around 3-5 minutes. Once this happens, take it of the heat and pour into a medium, heat-safe bowl to cool a bit.
  3. When cooled slightly, whisk in the muscovado, granulated sugar, oil, eggs, egg yolk, milk, and vanilla until thoroughly blended.
  4. In another medium bowl, whisk together the bread flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and sea salt. Add this to the butter mixture and stir until barely blended. Add in the chocolate chunks and continue to blend until just combined and the chocolate is evenly distributed.
  5. Pour the mixture into the prepared baking dish. Dampen your hands and gently press down so that is covers the bottom of the dish. Bake in the center of the oven for 25 minutes. (Note: bake time is dependent on pan type and oven temp. If they look significantly gooey at 25 minutes, feel free to leave in an additional 5-10. Bars will continue to cook and firm up some once removed from the oven.) Sprinkle with sea salt flakes, if desired. Let cool completely before cutting. These are great the same day as they’re made and equally dazzling the next.

Notes

  • If you use a larger or smaller pan be sure to adjust your bake time accordingly. Additionally, these were tested in ceramic pans. Note, if you use a metal pan check earlier for doneness as it could affect the bake time.
  • Check out the link in my post for help on browning butter!

Brown Butter Blondies : Two Ways

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy Thursday from sweet home Alabama! This time of year, at least in these parts, means that college football season is near. Yes, in just a few short days I will kiss my husband goodbye and re-familiarize myself with that far-off gaze that only a football game and a plate of buffalo hot wings can render. So to start this season off on the right foot, I’m sharing TWO super easy, crowd-pleasing, one-bowl recipes that you can show off at the tailgate nearest you. Yes, these brown butter blondies will make even the least interested college football fan (guilty) show up at your party tent ready to rumble.

Growing up, I was not what you would call a football fan. At the time, I had a healthy interest in professional and college basketball (GO CATS!), but football really wasn’t on my radar. It wasn’t until I moved to Birmingham, Alabama for college that I learned of the vicious football rivalries that existed in my new state. “So who do you pull for? Auburn or Alabama?” I heard that question a time or two and I’m pretty sure I laughed every time. I could have written a dissertation on the birthplace of jorts (thats “jean shorts” for those of you not from North Florida) with more interest than I could have aligned myself to one of two schools that I knew or cared nothing about. BYE FELECIA. 

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

By junior year, I had dated one (okay, one and a half) players from our school’s football team, so my knowledge in the sport had increased by at least 250%. I joined my sorority’s C-list flag football team, bought some knee socks and a fresh pair of Sophies, and determined I was ready to go pro.

Our team was, to say the least, bad. Okay, we were terrible. AWFUL. In one particular game, a girl on our team lost her shorts (and panties) to a flag pull gone wrong. Later, we executed our best play dubbed “The Eagle” where we all stopped running and began dancing on the field as some sort of means of distraction; it was not successful. The single time I touched the ball that evening was on a punt return where I caught the ball and ran towards the wrong end zone. I realized my mistake at the 15 yard line, immediatlely  panicked, and hurled the ball at an unassuming teammate. (Spoiler alert: she didn’t catch the ball. We lost the game. I’m told that everything I did was wrong.)

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you, like me, aren’t a savvy football fan or wouldn’t know a tailgate if it sat on your face, let me help you. Learn from the mistakes of the diehards and wannabes that have gone before you. Here are a few football fan fun facts that will keep you on the invite list for games to come.

 

How To Not Be A Loser At A Football Game:

  1. DO know which teams are playing in the game. People will laugh if you show up sporting your Keyshawn Johnson jersey and you don’t even know what team the Bucs are playing for the ring. Not like I know from experience or anything. 
  2. DO try to sit with people you know. You’ll regret that single scalped ticket if you wind up in the opposing team’s section next to a bunch of potty mouths.
  3. DON’T show up to a tailgate empty-handed! Cookies, a dip, or Chex mix are always appropriate. 
  4. DO wear your team colors, but avoid silks, rayon, and form-fitting clothes that will most certainly show off your pit stains and swamp butt. That is not winning. 
  5. DON’T drink too much in first quarter of the game. The bleachers are no place to sleep one off. 
  6. DO avoid the concession stand at halftime. No amount of chili dogs are worth those lines.
  7. DON’T sit next to the shirtless guys with the body paint unless you’re totally okay with the potential of this happening.
  8. DON’T leave a game early. It only takes one second to miss something.
  9. DO remember that tailgating is a marathon, not a sprint. Those Frito’s and sausage balls might go down smooth, but you don’t want to lug that with you to the upper bowl. 
  10. DO make all the brown butter blondies, all the time. FACT: people who bring blondies have more fun. 

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These brown butter blondies are tailgating staples. This recipe make a huge pan of treats, perfect for sharing, toting across the quad, and shoving in your pockets to get through game day security. Even better, this same batter can be prepared two ways, so with the same handful of ingredients you can have a variety of chewy goodies to share with the world. Ya welcome. 

To make these brown butter blondies, we start by browning some butter. Lucky for you, you’re a pro at browning butter, so you whip that up quickly and let the golden fat cool. From there, it’s a one bowl and done kind of recipe. Stir some brown sugar, eggs, and vanilla into your butter and then fold in the dry ingredients. That’s it! The batter is done.

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Next comes the fun part. Will it be white chocolate chips and coconut or cinnamon sugar snickerdoodle brown butter blondies? The world is your oyster here, so you take the pick. Hey, you could even go with dark chocolate and pistachios, toffee and pecans, whatever you darn well please. These brown butter blondies would taste good after sitting in a paper bag on the roof of your car for three days, but please, don’t ask me how I know that.

After baking, these brown butter blondies are chewy and oh-so flavorful. The white chocolate chip and coconut babies are a bit thicker and a little fluffier, while the snickerdoodle brown butter blondies are dense, intensely buttery, and perfectly spiced. The batter is the same for both variations, save for the toppings and the salt, and I think you’ll find both to be equally satisfying. 

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Don’t be a loser at this year’s football games. Don’t be like me. Just make these brown butter blondies and thank the heavens that someone (*raises hand*) has figured out the hard stuff for you. Get your game on this weekend and think of me when you sink your teeth into these bad boys. 

Also, there’s only ONE MORE WEEK to vote for your favorite bloggers in the Saveur Blog Awards. You’ll find me in the best baking and sweets category. Click here to vote today and as often as you’d like! 

 

If you like these brown butter blondies, be sure to check out:

Pecan Toffee Blondies

Derby Pie Bars

Pretzel Shortbread Peanut Butter Brownie

Blueberry Lemon Bars

Trail Mix Cookies

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Brown Butter Snickerdoodle Blondies

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Brown Butter Blondies made in two different ways- a cinnamon sugar snickerdoodle or a coconut white chocolate chip. Make your own variation with this adaptable recipe!

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 24 1x
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (230 gm) unsalted butter, cubed into equals sized pieces
  • 13/4 cups (360 gm) packed light brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 13/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 21/2 teaspoons cinnamon, divided
  • 11/2 tablespoons sugar

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line 9”x13” pan with aluminum foil and spray with cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. Add the butter to a light-bottomed pan over medium heat. Melt the butter, stirring regularly. Once the butter is melted and has stopped sizzling as frequently, begin to whisk constantly until the butter has browned to a medium-dark hue. (See notes for help.) Remove the butter to a separate large bowl. Allow to cool briefly, about 5 minutes.
  3. Once slightly cooled, add the brown sugar to the butter and whisk to combine. Add the eggs and the vanilla to the brown butter mixture and whisk to combine. Stir the flour, baking powder, salt, and 1-1/2 teaspoons cinnamon in a separate small bowl and then add it to the brown butter mixture, folding to just barely combine.
  4. Spread the batter into the prepared pan. Combine the remaining cinnamon and sugar and sprinkle over top of the blondie batter. Bake in the preheated oven, about 23-25 minutes or until the edges are set and a toothpick inserted to the center just barely comes out clean.

Notes

See my previous post on browning butter if you need a little help in this area.

 

 

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Coconut White Chocolate Chip Brown Butter Blondies

Brown Butter Blondies by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a recipe for how to make brown butter blondies with a few different variations. First, a fluffy blondie filled with white chocolate chunks / chips and shredded sweetened coconut. Second, a snickerdoodle type blondie filled with cinnamon and sugar- rich, buttery, and delicious. These blondies can be whipped up in one bowl and serve a crowd. Perfect for tailgating, parties, or to make with kids. You can substitute your favorite toppings- nuts, chocolate chips, or toffee! Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Brown Butter Blondies made in two different ways- a cinnamon sugar snickerdoodle or a coconut white chocolate chip. Make your own variation with this adaptable recipe!

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 24 1x
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (230 gm) unsalted butter, cubed into equals sized pieces
  • 13/4 cups (360 gm) packed light brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 11/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 cups (115 gm) sweetened shredded coconut
  • 11/4 cups (200 gm) white chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a 9”x13” pan with foil and spray with cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. Add the butter to a light-bottomed pan over medium heat. Melt the butter, stirring regularly. Once the butter is melted and has stopped sizzling as frequently, begin to whisk constantly until the butter has browned to a medium-dark hue. (See notes for help.) Remove the butter to a separate large bowl. Allow to cool briefly, about 5 minutes.
  3. Once slightly cooled, whisk the brown sugar into the brown butter. Add the eggs and the vanilla and whisk well to combine. In a seprate small bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the brown butter mixture and fold to combine. Add the coconut and white chocolate chips and fold just until combined.
  4. Spread the batter into the prepared pan and then bake in the preheated oven, about 25-30 minutes or until the edges are set and a toothpick inserted to the center just barely comes out clean.

Notes

See my previous post on browning butter if you need a little help in this area.

YOU NEED TO KNOW: How to Brown Butter

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

Brown butter. A sexy ingredient, if you ask me.

If you’ve been around the block a time or two, you’ve probably already become acquainted with brown butter. You know it by its nutty aroma and speckled amber hue. You’ve already been allured by the rich caramel flavors, seduced by the complexity it adds to sweet and savory dishes alike. But for the average home baker, brown butter is a mystery. What is it? Where can I find it? How do I make it?

If you fall into that second category, allow me to make the introduction. It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the magical world of brown butter. 

 

WHAT IS IT?

Brown butter, or beurre noisette, is basically regular old butter that is gently melted and cooked until it browns which results in a change of flavor, aroma, and color. Butter is made up of water, fat, and protein. When it is cooked beyond the point of melting, the water will slowly evaporate leaving the butterfat and milk protein to continue cooking. As the proteins cook, they will begin to brown, which will be evident in the changes that you’ll notice in your pan. 

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

 

HOW DO YOU MAKE IT?

A fine question, dear friend. I’m glad you asked. To make brown butter, all you need is a quality stick of butter, a metal pan for your stovetop (I use this one), and a whisk or a spatula to gently stir with. I prefer to use a a light bottomed pan and a whisk, so whip those out if you have them. To help explain the browning process, I’ve taken some photos and notes. Let’s get started!

Step One: Melt the butter

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

Place your butter in a pan over medium-low heat. I like to cube my butter into equal sized chunks, and I prefer a light-colored pan so that I can monitor the browning process easily. Use whatever you feel comfortable with. Allow the butter to melt, stirring occasionally, until the butter is entirely liquid. As the butter continues to heat, it will begin to sizzle and foam, which is a good indication that the water has begun to evaporate.

Step Two: Begin browning the butter

Once the water has completely evaporated, the protein in the butter can begin browning! This is when you need to stay glued to your pan. Once you notice that the butter isn’t sizzling as much, begin whisking it regularly to ensure that the proteins brown evenly. We don’t want to burn the butter on the bottom of the pan while the liquid skimming the top remains unaffected. So keep whisking and watching. You’ll notice little golden flecks beginning to form on the bottom of the pan which is a thumbs up that you’re getting super close. 

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

Step Three: Brown that butter!

The butter will continue to darken and brown as it cooks. Man your post at the stove and keep that whisk moving to ensure that the milk proteins cook evenly and you don’t wind up with burnt bits of butter. You’ll notice the changing aromas as the butter continues to brown. Trust me when I tell you that it tastes as good as it smells. Keep stirring and agitating the butter until you reach your desired degree of darkness. Then, remove the pan from the stovetop and pour the butter, browned bits and all, into a separate bowl. Don’t leave it in the pan or the residual heat will continue to cook and brown your butter, likely resulting in a burnt finish.

The trickiest part of this process is knowing when to pull you pan from the heat. There are a few different degrees of brown butter. Some recipes may call for a lighter, less-browned butter, while others may encourage you to continuing cooking, even to the point of nearly burning it. So to help identify what you’re looking for, I’ve got you covered with a photo lineup of the different varieties of brown butter. 

First up is a super-light, golden brown butter. At this phase of the game, you’ll notice deep golden flecks forming at the bottom of the pan, but the overall hue is still pretty light. This degree of brown butter isn’t as rich in flavor, but may be just the ticket for a number of dishes. If a recipe you’re using calls for “lightly browned butter,” this is exactly what you’re looking for.

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

Next up is the OG of brown butter- the gold standard. When in doubt, go for this degree of brown butter. Here, the color is darker, and the flavor is richer. This butter will give off a strong nutty, almost caramel scent and those same flavors will be present in the taste as well. This is the brown butter we fold into streusel crumbs, toss in our pasta sauces, and whisk into sugar for a delightfully decadent cake glaze.

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

If you’re willing to take the risk and allow your butter to brown in the pan just until the point of burning, you can score the darkest butter of all. Ultra-dark brown butter adds scads of flavor when chilled and creamed into cookies, cakes, and more. The extra color results in an extra oomph of flavor, so you’ll land terrific tasting treats every time.  

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

 

HOW CAN I USE IT?

I have a very specific rule of thumb about when it is most appropriate to use brown butter. Are you ready? Ok, here it is:

USE BROWN BUTTER ALL THE TIME BECAUSE IT’S THE BEST.

That’s it! Simple, right? Ok, I’m kind of kidding. When making things like pasta sauces, salad dressings, toppings for breads and sauces for proteins, brown butter is a perfectly acceptable substitution for regular butter and oil. However, when adding brown butter to baked goods like cookies, cakes, and pie crusts, there’s a few things to consider. Remember how we cooked all of the water out of the butter? Well, water is a really important part of baking! We need water to add moisture, to create steam in the oven, and to do a number of other nerdy food science stuff that I won’t bore your with here. So if we substitute brown butter for regular butter, we have to remember that our final outcome will likely be affected by of the lack of H2O. To compensate, sometimes you can add a bit less dry ingredient (like flour) or a wee bit of extra water or fat. But sometimes brown butter just isn’t a good sub and we just have to dry our tears and be okay with that. 

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

 

So, do you have any recipes using brown butter?

I thought you’d never ask. Of course! I use brown butter in a number of recipes, a couple of which are already on this site! You can check out my raspberry rhubarb crumb cake (with a brown butter crumb), carrot cake with brown butter glaze, or the ever-delightful hummingbird muffins (with a brown butter streusel) for some delicious and sweet recipe inspiration. I’ll also add the links to a few other personal faves below.

 Chewy, Gooey Golden Rice Krispie Treats

Brown Butter and Peanut Brittle Ice Cream

Brown Butter Pecan Pie

Is there anything else I need to know about brown butter?

Yes. There’s tons. But this isn’t that kind of blog. I’m giving you what I think you want to know as well as a few other science geek tidbits that I just couldn’t hold myself back from. If you have more questions about brown butter or using it in your favorite recipes, please share them with me below in the comments section! I would love to help in any way!

This is the first in what I hope will become a fun and helpful series for you all. Baking becomes so much easier and enjoyable when you understand some basics and have a few tips and techniques up your sleeve to help achieve success in the kitchen every time. So stick around for a few more things you need to know. I can’t wait to share more! Have a great weekend and cheers to you!

 

If you like this tutorial on how to make brown butter, be sure to check out:

Smash Cake Tutorial

Smash Cake Tutorial Recipe By The Wood and Spoon Blog. Blue Ombred cake- looks like the ocean! Sharing tips and techniques for decorating mini 6" smash cakes to be served at a little boy or girl first birthday party! You'll find out how to decorate a cake with flowers, top with color balls of fondant, ombre layer cake, and rustic frosting style done with an offset spatula or palette knife. Read more about the how to and find some colorful kid birthday party inspiration here! www.woodandspoon.com

Gold Splattered Sugar Cookie Tutorial

Lavender Vanilla Bean Sugar Cookies Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood and Abby Hollar of The Hollardays Blog. This is a simple recipe for homemade cutout sugar cookies flavored with dried lavender and vanilla bean paste. The icing is simple and dries quick and doesn't require a piping bag or tip like Royal icing. The gold lustre luster dust is mixed with alcohol to create a shiny metallic paint that you can splatter on your cookies with a basting brush. Find the tutorial and how to paint cookies on thewoodandspoon.com

Painted Sugar Cookies 

Painted Sugar Cookies Recipe and Tutorial by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a recipe for almond vanilla sugar cutout cookies that doesn't require chilling the dough. The dough holds its shape for cookie cutters. The frosting isn't like a royal icing- it is a simple glaze made with milk and powdered sugar and flavoring. you can pipe or dip the cookies icing on and then paint with food coloring gel and alcohol. Find the how to on the blog thewoodandspoon.com

Cake Baking Tips

Blood Orange Bundt Cake Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A vanilla and citrus scented cake made with blood orange zest and juice, this bundt cake is fluffy, moist, and an easy one bowl recipe what to make with blood oranges. The glaze is a simple blood orange juice icing that is pink and so fun to make! This makes a large bundt cake but you can adapt it to make it in round pans or even muffin tins. You could try this recipe in a tube pan with removable bottom as well. Find this winter citrus, festive cake on thewoodandspoon.com

 

 

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How to Brown Butter

How to Make Brown Butter Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog By Kate Wood. This is a step by step photo tutorial on how to brown butter / beurre noisette. Will give the instruction and science behind browning butter and how to make the best type of browned butter for your baked goods, sweet and savory dishes. Find out what color brown butter should be and how to know if you've browned it enough! DIY here on thewoodandspoon.com

This is a quick and simply tutorial on how to brown butter. Making brown butter has never been easier with this photographic how-to!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 10
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (113 gm) unsalted butter, cut into equal-sized chunks.

Instructions

  1. Place butter chunks in a light-colored pan over medium-low heat. Allow the butter to melt completely, stirring occasionally to ensure even cooking.
  2. Once the butter has melted, you’ll notice it begin to sizzle and foam. Continue stirring occasionally. Once the crackling has subsided, you’ll notice small golden flecks forming on the bottom of the pan. Begin stirring constantly with a whisk or a spatula to agitate the butter and keep it cooking evenly. Continue cooking until the desired level of brownness is reached. Remove the butter from the pan to a separate bowl to discontinue the cooking process.

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

Bonjour, friends! I am writing to you today from sunny St. Barth’s- the French-speaking Caribbean island full of chic travelers, posh locals, and divine cuisine. I’m definitely a little fish in a big pond here, but honestly, I couldn’t feel fancier if I tried. Brett and I traveled to the island with some dear friends and have spent the better part of the past few days sun bathing, day drinking, and taking in all of the European vibes the island has to offer. It’s been incredible getting to unplug and I can’t wait to share more about out trip with y’all later. All of the world travel seemed to be an appropriate time to share this raspberry rhubarb crumb cake and to tell you about another recent international experience I had.

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .Several weeks ago, my friend Erin of Cloudy Kitchen flew from Brooklyn, NY to our small, Southern town for a few days of baking, blog talk, and fun. Erin is a New Zealand born food blogger that I met via the blogosphere, and we have had the most fun getting to know each other. She’s been a sounding board for recipe concepts, a help with troubleshooting computer woes, and constant source of encouragement throughout my first year of blogging. Her trip to Selma was our very first in-person meet, but I doubt it will be the last.

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

While Erin and I were together, we baked a number of things including a delightful crumb cake. Rhubarb had just made its first appearance in the produce section, so we swiped a bit for our weekend together and baked several test batches of a peach rhubarb cake based on Deb’s famous recipe. It was fab.

This raspberry rhubarb crumb cake is one of the versions we came up with together. A dense but moist sour cream cake layered with a gooey, sweet raspberry rhubarb filling, and topped with the most glorious salted brown butter crumb topping. It’s glamorous enough for dessert, yet simple enough to enjoy alongside your morning coffee and tea. Could this raspberry rhubarb crumb cake be the most well-rounded treat of all time? I think, maybe so.

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

To prepare the cake, we start by browning butter. (Update: If you need a tutorial on browning butter, check that out here!) A whole stick (and then some!) sizzles and foams away in a pan before turning golden, fragrant, and nutty. We combine that with some brown sugar, plenty of salt, and a few other ingredients to make a super-sized portion of crumble to top our cake. The cake whips up quickly with a few humble ingredients- butter, sugar, and sour cream to name a few- and the batter finishes ultra thick and tangy. Finally, we mix up the fruit filling which is nothing more than some diced rhubarb, fresh raspberries, and just enough sugar to offset the tart bite of the fruit. We spread the cake batter into the bottom of a 9″ pan, slather it with the fruit filling, and sprinkle on those brown butter crumbles. After a leisurely bake in the oven, the cake is golden, gooey, and nothing short of delightful. 

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

This raspberry rhubarb crumb cake is a new favorite of mine for a number of reasons. The tang of the sour cream mixed with the sweet fruit and salty, brown butter crumbles is a match made in heaven. The variety of textures makes each bite of this cake noteworthy, something special worth discovering. And while the cake is certainly decadent thanks to the rich topping and juicy filling, it remains simple and understated- like a favorite, old sweater that is perfectly broken in and fits just right. 

Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. A thick and fluffy sour cream cake filled with gooey raspberry and sweetened rhubarb. The whole cake is topped with a brown butter and sugar streusel crumb. This is a simple and easy summer cake that bakes quicky and can be easily adapted for a number of other summer berries, stone fruit, or other fruits. Find the recipe for this dessert like breakfast / snack cake at thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com .

If you’ve been noticing the rhubarb in the produce section of your grocery store, this raspberry rhubarb crumb cake is the perfect way to use it up. Give it a try and share it with a new friend. You can also check out Erin’s site for a different variation of this cake. It’s a rhubarb peach crumb cake with that same glorious brown butter topping and dense cake. GLORIOUS! In the meantime, I’m going to keep soaking up this sunshine and Caribbean breeze, and we can meet up here again next week, cool? Happy Wednesday to you and cheers!

If you like this raspberry rhubarb crumb cake, you may love:

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. Tart rhubarb, sweet berries and a touch of cinnamon make this the perfect pie. Post includes information on how to use and trim rhubarb, tips on preparing the perfect flaky butter pie crust, and other spring pie inspiration. Can be made with a decorative or lattice braid pie top. thewoodandspoon.com

Raspberry Streusel Cake

Raspberry Streusel Cake Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog. Three layers of brown sugar vanilla cake filled with a quick and simple raspberry compote and sprinkles of cinnamon sugar streusel crumble. The naked cake is coated in a tangy cream cheese frosting. This layer cake can be prepared in parts days in advance and stays moist over time. Find this party cake recipe (perfect for holidays and Mother's Day !) on www.thewoodandspoon.com / woodandspoon.com

Berry Almond Streusel Pie

Berry Almond Streusel Pie

Hummingbird Muffins

Hummingbird Muffins Recipe by thewoodandspoon.com . Crumb / streusel topped muffins based on the classic Southern hummingbird cake recipe, these muffins are filled with brown butter, banana, pineapple, brown sugar, and nuts. Topped with a simple glaze/ drizzle. This recipe would be perfect for an Easter breakfast or brunch and are a great treat to share with friends. Simple, easy recipe based on Bake From Scratch Coffee Cake. By The Wood and Spoon Blog.

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

Apple Crumb Cake

Apple Crumb Cake

 

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Raspberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake

This raspberry rhubarb crumb cake is a dense sour cream cake filled with a gooey, raspberry rhubarb fruit filling and topped with a salted brown butter crumble.

  • Author: Kate Wood and Erin Clarkson
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Scale

Ingredients

For the crumble

  • 11 tablespoons (155 gm) unsalted butter, diced
  • 1 cup (210 gm) brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste (vanilla extract can be substituted)
  • 12/3 cup (200 gm) all-purpose flour

For the cake

  • 2 cups (240 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ¾ cup (150 gm) sugar
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons milk (any variety), at room temperature
  • 2/3 cup (160 gm) full-fat sour cream, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste (vanilla extract can be substituted)
  • 2 cups of ½” diced rhubarb (washed and trimmed of tops and ends, about 240 gm/ 8-1/2 ounces before trimming)
  • 2 cups (150 gm) raspberries
  • 2 tablespoons of brown sugar

Instructions

To prepare the crumble

  1. Add the diced butter to a small saucepan or skillet set over medium heat. Stir with a whisk or swirl the pan occasionally to ensure the butter is melting evenly. Once melted, the butter will sizzle, foam, and eventually start forming little golden bits on the bottom of the pan. Continue cooking and stirring regularly until the butter has taken on an amber color and nutty aroma. Take care not to burn the butter. Remove the pan from heat and pour the brown butter into a medium sized mixing bowl.
  2. To the mixing bowl, add the brown sugar, salt, and vanilla bean paste, and stir to combine. Add the flour and fold until large crumble clumps form and the flour is well incorporated. Set aside in the fridge while you prepare the cake.

To prepare the cake

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Spray a 9” square or round baking pan with cooking spray and line the bottom with a square of parchment paper for easy removal, if desired.
  2. Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt in a small bowl and set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugar together on medium speed until light and fluffy, about two minutes. Add the egg, vanilla bean paste, and milk and beat on low until well combined. Scrape the bowl, if needed, to ensure that everything is evenly incorporated. Add about 1/3 of the dry ingredients and beat on low speed to combine. Add ½ of the sour cream and beat to combine. Repeat this process once more and then add the remaining dry ingredients, stirring on low to combine. Scrape the sides of the bowl and fold in any unincorporated bits. Your batter will be quite thick.
  4. Spread the batter evenly in the bottom of your lined pan. In a separate bowl, toss the rhubarb and raspberries together with the brown sugar and spread this mixture on top of the cake batter. Gently press the fruit into the batter a bit. Crumble the brown butter streusel evenly on top of the fruit and place the pan in the preheated oven. Bake for about 50 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted comes out clean (See notes). Allow to cool slightly before eating. Cake will keep best at room temperature, covered tightly in plastic wrap.

Notes

  • If you bake your cake in a smaller, 8″ pan, baking time will differ. Check with a toothpick for doneness.
  • The fruit can coat your cake tester, causing it to appear less than done. If you notice cake batter coating your cake tester, allow the cake to remain in the oven a bit longer, however, be sure you are not mistaking fruit juices for uncooked cake.

Recipe Adapted From: Smitten Kitchen

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

This past week, my great grandmother (I called her Grandma Grape) passed away. She was 97 and lived a beautiful life- one marked by kindness and joy, wisdom and love. Since her passing, I’ve found myself quietly inspired, desperately wanting a similar kind of grace on my life. Somehow, knowing that it’s possible to live and die as beautifully as she did fills me with so much hope.

I’m sure you know people like this- the ones that make it count. People who use up their lives and time and every last bit of air in their lungs to make the world around them a better place. People that love their families fiercely and spur on their neighbors towards goodness. People that change the atmosphere. These are the ones who leave a legacy worth remembering.

A few photos of Grandma Great from when I was a baby. Check out my babe of a mom and Nana. And of course sweet Grandpa Great too. 🙂

My sweet Grandma Grape was one of them. Though I won’t see her earthy body any longer, I know I will catch glimpses of her life in the lives of the women who came after her. I see her warmth and benevolence in my beautiful Nana. Her faith and grace in the peacefulness of my Mother. I see her spunk and playfulness in the laughter of my own daughter. The lasting effect of the beauty she created on this earth will continue to make waves throughout generations to come, and it’s a concept so lovely and full of possibility that my heart can’t help but be encouraged. 

5 generations of women, beginning with Grandma and ending with my sweet Aimee girl.

If you know somebody who is making this kind of a difference, I would challenge you to rise to the occassion and tell them. Give them a call, a hug, or even use this free letter template to write it out with pen. Don’t let the opportunity to be intentional with the people you love pass you by.

I, for one, have a renewed resolve to make it count. I want to be a human worth remembering and to be a person that spends their life on the cause in their heart for the people around them. The glimmer of hope from great grandmother’s legacy tells me that it’s possible… So that’s the new goal.

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by Kate Wood of The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

This carrot bundt cake is right for the times. It feels comforting and familiar- like a cake my grandmother and the women who came before her might have made. And with Easter just around the corner, a cake like this needs no excuse for making. 

The recipe for this carrot bundt cake was adapted from Paula Deen, the queen of Southern heirloom recipes herself. This cake has a dense but tender crumb, kept extra moist from the addition of several eggs, oil, and finely grated carrots. Though the warmly flavored cake ordinarily steals the show in similar recipes, here, the brown butter glaze is the star. Nutty, buttery, and just barely sweet enough to make the carrot bundt cake worthy of the title “dessert”, this brown butter glaze is delicious and dangerously tempting to eat straight from a bowl with a spoon. (Update: for help on browning butter, see my post here!)

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

The preparation for this bundt cake is rather simple. You’ll need some muscle to peel and grate the carrots, but from there, it’s a one bowl situation that requires nothing more than a mixer and a finger to lick the bowl with. This recipe will prepare enough batter to fill a 10-cup bundt pan, but you can use a larger 15-cup pan like I did with no problem. If you lack a bundt pan large enough, just fill the pans you have no more than 3/4 of the way full and pour remaining batter into additional pans. This recipe will produce enough batter to fill approximately 3-8″ round cake pans, so if you’d prefer to make the cake that way, you certainly can, however, keep in mind that baking time will change. 

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

If you need a soul-comforting recipe to share with people you love, this carrot bundt cake is just the thing. There’s a number of other Easter-worthy recipes in the blog archives, so be sure to check out a few that I’ve bookmarked below. I hope your week is filled with lots of joy, and if you need encouragement to make it through, please contact me via the comments section below or by email on the “About Me” page of this blog. This Sunday is the most hopeful day of my year and I’d love to share it with you. Happy baking and cheers to you!

If you like this carrot bundt cake, you may also like:

Easter Cake

Blood Orange Bundt Cake

White Chocolate Cake

Hummingbird Muffins

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Lemon Almond Poppyseed Cake

Ginger Molasses Bunt Cake

 

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Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze

Carrot Bundt Cake with Brown Butter Glaze by The Wood and Spoon Blog. This moist cinnamon and carrot flavored cake is topped with a browned butter frosting and toasted chopped pecans. This recipe is one bowl, easy, and can be modified to make a layer cake as well. Perfect for parties and upcoming Easter brunch, breakfast, or dessert. thewoodandspoon.com

This carrot bundt cake is a moist and tender cake topped with brown butter glaze and toasted pecans. Serves a crowd and perfect for breakfast, brunch, or dessert.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 10 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the cake

  • 2 cups sugar (400 gm)
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 cup oil (240 mL)
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (240 gm)
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 3 cups finely grated carrots (340 gm, about 1 pound unpeeled)

For the brown butter frosting

  • 6 tablespoons (80 gm) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 11/2 cups (190 gm) powdered sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 14 tablespoons milk
  • 1/4 cup pecans, toasted and chopped

Instructions

To prepare the cake

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a bundt pan with at least 10 cup capacity.
  2. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the sugar, eggs, oil, and vanilla. Beat on medium speed (I use number 4 setting on my stand mixer) for 2 minutes. Add the flour, soda, salt, and cinnamon and stir just until barely combined. Fold in the carrots. Pour the mixture into the bundt pan. Bake for approximately 35-40 minutes or until a toothpick or cake tester inserted comes out clean. Allow to cool for about 10 minutes in the pan and then invert on to a cooling rack. Allow to cool completely if you want the frosting to drizzle evenly.

To prepare the brown butter frosting

  1. Add the cubed butter to a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir occasionally until the butter is melted to ensure that it melts evenly. Once the butter has melted, it will begin to bubble.Continue to stir regularly. Small golden flecks will begin to form on the bottom of the pan. Stir or whisk gently continuously at this point as the butter is beginning to brown. The bubbling should subside at this point and you should notice the butter takes on a golden tint and begins to smell nutty. Do not let it burn, but stir until golden brown and then whisk the mixture into a medium sized bowl to cool slightly.
  2. Once slightly cooled, about 5 minutes, add the sugar and salt, whisking to slightly combine. Add a tablespoon of milk, and continue to add small amounts until the mixture is the right consistency. I like my glaze a bit thicker so that it drizzles nicely on the sides of the cake. To test for this viscosity, drag your whisk through the mixture- the line in the mixture should come back together almost completely in about ten seconds. Pour the glaze over the cake.

Notes

  • I like to use a finely grated carrot so that it evenly disperses in the cake and stays extra moist. Do not use store-bought pre-shredded carrots.
  • You can also bake this cake in round cake pans (3). Baking time will differ.
  • If your brown butter frosting sets out for too long it will start to crust over. Heat for 5-10 seconds in the microwave and whisk to prepare it for the cake again.
  • If you burn your butter, pour out and start again! There are great videos on Youtube on browning butter.
  • For help on browning butter, see my post here: http://thewoodandspoon.com/you-need-to-know-how-to-brown-butter/

Recipe Adapted From: Paula Deen