crust

Cheddar Apple Pie

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

My favorite recipes are the ones that evoke memories. Nana’s banana bread. My mom’s baked spaghetti. Mimi’s chicken and dumplings. The foods that come attached with a series of moments or a special person are the ones that I find most comforting. They just taste like home. Since this is the first recipe of the *official* fall season (let’s be honest, I’ve been secretly dreaming of fall via my denim-filled online shopping carts and cozy coffee creamer choices for about a month now), I thought I’d go all out and share a super fallish recipe: cheddar apple pie.

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

Apple pie, for me and likely every other Thanksgiving-celebrating American, is an incredibly nostalgic recipe. One of my first real baking experiences was spent with floury hands in a bowl of pie dough destined to encase a gooey apple and cinnamon filling. My Mimi, who makes apple and pumpkin pies every Thanksgiving, first let me saddle up at the counter with her as a middle schooler. With two forks and some serious forearm endurance, we cut fat into dry ingredients, pat together clumps of shaggy dough, and gingerly rolled out thin slabs to fit inside of the glass dishes. It was a technique and recipe she had used for years, and I learned how to make pie dough by studying her methodical movements over the edge of the counter.

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

Pie dough is still sometimes a mystery to me, and although I have a favorite classic recipe, an all-butter recipe, and even a savory cornmeal dough, I’m always tinkering with the ingredients and technique to try out new combinations. Still, very few pie crusts taste as good to me as the ones that hold my Mimi’s apple pie filling, because you just can’t beat nostalgia.

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

This cheddar apple pie is a variation of sorts of a few different pie dough and filling recipes that I’ve used over the years. Here, the classic apple, sugar, cinnamon, and spice combination is complimented by a cheddar cheese and butter crust. Yes, we literally take a delicious block of Kerrygold aged cheddar cheese, finely shred it, and work all that goodness into the flour and butter. The final outcome is a crust whose flavor is subtle but entirely unique, a pairing that goes really well with the autumnal filling.

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

If you’re new to pie making, don’t let this cheddar apple pie scare you. Adding savory elements to dessert is never really my favorite thing, but here, the cheese only barely scents the crust of what is otherwise an entirely sweet and cozy pie. Loads of sugar and apple pie spice bake in with juicy apples until the insides are bubbling and thickened. If you notice you crust starts to brown too much before the filling has had a chance to thicken up, just lightly drape it in a sheet of tin foil. I always like to bake the pie with a larger sheet pan or piece of foil directly beneath it to catch any bubbled-over juices as well.

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

Here’s a few more basic pie tips to help you out along the way! I want you to have the best luck with this cheddar apple pie, so for best results check out these tricks I always like to adhere to:

  1. Don’t overwork the dough! Cut your fat into the dry ingredients and stir in the water with as few steps as possible to keep your dough tender. If you work with it too long it will get tough.
  2. Work with a chilled dough. Slightly warm or less than cold doughs will slouch and not keep their shape in the pan!
  3. Know that all pie plates bake differently. I prefer to bake pies in my hearty metal pan because I find this yields the most evenly baked pies. Beware that pie crust tends to sag or shrink back in ceramic pie plates. I like to briefly freeze my bottom crust to help prevent this from happening.
  4. Leave a little hangover. When you roll out your bottom crust, you’ll need about a 1-2″ hangover of dough on all sides to give you enough to work with.
  5. Bake until the juices are bubbling! Bubbling juices in the center of the pie means that your filling will have had time to bake up. No bubbles means a runny filling.
  6. Be patient while you wait for your pie to cool. I like to let my pie come to room temperature throughout before cutting into it. You can speed up this process by placing it in the fridge.

Honestly, there’s probably a million other things I could say about pie baking, but I’ll leave you alone for now. In the meantime, many thanks to Kerrygold for sponsoring this delicious post. I hope you all pick up some of their fab aged cheddar and unsalted butter to make this cheddar apple pie. You won’t regret it! Happy fall, y’all!

If you like this cheddar apple pie you should try:

Caramel Apple Pie

Apple Frangipane Tart

Brown Sugar Apple Bundt Cake

Chicken Pot Pie with Cheddar Cornmeal Crust

Cranberry Pear Pop-Tarts

 

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Cheddar Apple Pie

Cheddar Apple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is an apple pie with an all-butter and cheddar cheese crust. The fruit filling is flavored with cinnamon and fall spices and is juicy. The cheddar crust is lightly flavored and flaky. Learn more about how to on this autumn lattice pie on thewoodandspoon.com

This is a traditional cinnamon-spiced apple pie with a cheddar cheese and butter pie crust!

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 40
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 240
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 21/4 cups (350 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (230 gm) unsalted butter, cold and diced
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup ice water
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

For the filling:

  • 4 lbs apples (I used about 7 fuji apples), peeled, cored and sliced 1/8” thick
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon apple pie spice
  • 2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 egg white whisked with 1 teaspoon water

Instructions

To prepare the crust:

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse in the butter until pea-sized clumps exist throughout. Pulse in the cheese to combine barely. Pour the vinegar into your ice water and stir. Add about 5 tablespoons of the water mixture into the bowl of the processor and pulse a bit. Add water a tablespoon more at a time until the mix begins to come together into a shaggy dough. Don’t overwork it.  Dump the dough out onto a clean surface and bring it together into a ball. Cut the dough in half and flatten each piece into a disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and allow to chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours.

To prepare the pie:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Use a floured rolling pin to roll out half of the dough onto a floured surface into a circle about an inch wider than your pie plate on all sides. Roll the dough back onto the pin and then unroll it into the pie dish. Brush a thin layer of the egg white wash onto the pie dough and place in the freezer while you prep your filling. Combine the sliced apples with the sugar, brown sugar, flour, lemon juice, spice, vanilla, and salt. Toss to evenly coat the apples. Gently ease the dough into the edges of the pie dish and dump the filling into the prepared pie dish. Roll out the second half of dough onto a flour surface and use it to cut lattice strips or top your pie. Cut a few vent strips into the top of the pie if you opt out of a lattice and crimp the edges of the pie together as desired. Brush a thin layer of the egg white wash on top of the pie dough and place in the oven. Decrease the oven heat to 400 degrees and bake for 20 minutes. Decrease the heat to 375 and bake for an additional 30 minutes or until the filling is bubbling under the crust. You can top the pie crust with a sheet of aluminum foil if it begins to look too dark. Allow to cool completely prior to cutting!

Lemon Olive Oil Pie

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

How’s that post-Thanksgiving hangover treating you? Have you exhausted your drawstring pants and oversized tees? Have you polished off your final few turkey sandwiches and leftover slices of pie?

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

With our move-in date looming just around the corner, we opted to stay close by for Thanksgiving to celebrate with Brett’s family. Although I enjoy the nuances of holidays with his family, I can’t help but miss the comfort and familiarity of the traditions that I grew up with. I’m obsessed with the cornbread dressing and bacon-y green beans that this Southern Thanksgiving provided me, but I missed the things that really make it feel like the holidays- my grandparents scurrying around the kitchen, nibbling on trays of olives with my Mom, and even passing around that carrot salad that absolutely no one eats. It’s funny how much things like that, the atmosphere and the faces and the flavors that you grow up with, shape your idea of what a holiday or gathering should look like. I think the absence of those things deepens my love and appreciation for the people who created those moments for me. 

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

With Thanksgiving behind us, its easy to want to dive right in to the Christmas cookies and pound cakes and peppermint-flavored everything that comes with December, but in an effort to transition gracefully from turkeys to Christmas trees, I have a delicious and elegant pie that is perfectly appropriate for this limbo time of year. This lemon olive oil pie, a spin on a Southern lemon chess pie, is fragrant and flavorful, a treat that is as tasty as it is beautiful. I’m sharing this recipe today in partnership with my friends at Lucini Italia. You might recall the cheesy rolls I served alongside their sauce a few weeks ago, but did you know that they also make premium olive oils as well? This lemon olive oil pie is the perfect showcase for quality oil, as the flavor and smells of it come through in a really unique way. 

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

First, we have an olive oil pie crust. Adapted from my trusty, no-fail crust, this pie dough has the addition of olive oil to it! Although it does just barely change the texture of the crust, it provides a subtle whiff of that olive oil flavor that is interesting and super tasty to eat. The filling here, similar to the chocolate chess pie I shared this time last year, is scented with lemon zest and utilizes olive oil in place of the butter. The texture of this filling is really very similar to any normal chess pie, but again, the flavor of the olive oil meshes perfectly with the tangy citrus. It’s really lovely. 

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

The key here really is the olive oil. Although the flavor is extremely subtle, any olive oil that doesn’t have a definitively fresh and delicious flavor will simply make the pie taste greasy. Gross, right? Lucini is a brand I trust to provide quality olive oil for a variety of my baking and cooking needs, but it especially shines in this pie. If you’re on the hunt for a favorite olive oil, I would highly suggest giving Lucini a try.

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

I like to finish this lemon olive oil pie with freshly whipped cream. This is totally optional, but I think it adds a nice finishing touch to an already fab pie. Although I lean on pies most throughout the holidays, I think a dish like this would be perfectly delicious in the spring or summer as well. It’s bright, fresh, and flavorful while still maintaining it’s status as an indulgent, rich dessert. 

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

Happy pie making to you all! I hope you’ll give this pie a try in the coming weeks! 

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

This post is sponsored by Lucini Italia. Thank you for supporting brands that make Wood and Spoon possible.

If you like this lemon olive oil pie you should try:

Salted Maple Pie

Cherry Lime Hand Pies

Blueberry Lemon Pop-Tarts

Blueberry Lemon Bars

Alphabet Cream Pie

 

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Lemon Olive Oil Pie

Lemon Olive Oil Pie Recipe by wood and spoon blog. This is a lemon zest and juice filled chess pie made with and olive oil pie crust. The flavor of the Lucini olive oil comes out subtly and perfumes this pie. The crust crisps nicely and the filled stays gooey and sweet like a lemon bar. Finish the pie off with freshly whipped cream. Read more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

This lemon olive oil pie is a tangy and refreshing take on a Southern chess pie. Topped with whipped cream and flavored with quality Lucini olive oil, this is a delicious pie perfect all year round. 

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 25
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 13/4 cup (245 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 11/2 teaspoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup (60 gm) olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons (85 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • Ice water

For the pie:

  • 4 large eggs (240 gm), plus an additional for brushing the pie crust, if desired
  • 11/2 cups (300 gm) sugar
  • 1/3 cup (80 gm) olive oil
  • 1/3 cup (80 gm) buttermilk
  • ¼ cup (60 gm) fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

For the whipped cream:

  • 11/4 cups (300 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar

Instructions

To prepare the pie crust:

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Add the olive oil and cold butter and use a pastry cutter to cut in the fat until small clumps are throughout. Do not overwork the dough. Add about 6 tablespoons of water, more as needed a tablespoon at a time, to bring the floury clumps together into a shaggy dough. Again, do NOT overwork- this will yield a tough crust. Dump the dough out onto a counter and bring it into a ball and then flatten it into a round. Cover it with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rest in the fridge for at least an hour, but preferably for several hours.

To prepare the pie:

  1. When ready to bake the pie, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Allow the dough to sit out at room temp for about 5 minutes and then roll it out with a rolling pin on a floured surface until it is about an 11” diameter circle. The dough needs to be an inch large on all sides than the diameter of your pie plate. Roll the dough up onto the rolling pin and unroll it into the pie plate. Gently nudge the dough into the edges of the pan and trim off any excess around the top, leaving a ½” over the edge of the lip of the pan on all sides. Fold the dough until and press to seal the crust. Crimp your edges as desired and then place the pie dish in the freezer while you prep the pie filling.
  2. Whisk the 4 eggs and sugar in a large bowl. Add the olive oil, buttermilk, lemon juice, and vanilla and whisk just to combine. Add the lemon zest, flour, and salt and stir just until combined. Pull the pie plate out of the freezer, and, if desired, whisk the remaining egg in a small bowl and brush a thing layer of the mixture on the edges of the crust. This only helps with browning and is not necessary. Pour the filling into the pie and bake in the preheated oven about 40 minutes or until the crust and top of the pie is golden and bronzed. You may need to rotate the pie the last 10 minutes to allow it to brown evenly. Allow to cool to room temperature prior to serving.

To prepare the whipped cream:

  1. Whip the heavy whipping cream on medium speed until frothy and slightly thickened. Add the sugar and continue beating until smooth, thick peaks form. Top the pie and serve immediately.

Salted Maple Pie

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

I can’t claim the recipe for this salted maple pie as my own, but I love it so much that it feels like my child. This pie, straight from a brand-spanking new book called “Sister Pie” is a winning treat that your falls need. Trust me. 

Something I’ve been learning about over the last five or so years of my life is how to celebrate others. There was a period of time in my life where my own insecurity prevented me from whole-heartedly cheering on the people around me. I guess I thought that if someone else was successful, hitting milestones faster than me, or achieving things I wanted in my own life it would somehow diminish my own gifts and the good things in my life. Like someone else’s advancement meant I was stuck behind. Obviously that type of mentality was gross and damaging for a number of reasons, but I think the thing I missed out on most was the opportunity to share in the joy of someone else’s successes.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

One of my favorite things about life in a small town is how friends, neighbors, and even complete strangers can come to feel like family. In the confines of a tiny city, it’s easy to recognize how closely your life is knitted to the people around you and wanting the best for them becomes an absolute no brainer. Their struggles become your struggles, their joys become your joys, and the triumphs and blessings in their lives will eventually trickle down to affect yours in a positive way too. When one person succeeds in a small town, everyone eventually shares in that reward, and I’ve found that taking part in their stories, investing passion and love into the things that are important to them, almost always feels like a shared victory in the end. This way of living, this crazy love and support for the people around you, is is one of the most heart-filling things I’ve ever experienced in my life, and if you’ve felt it too, I bet you’d agree.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

This notion of sharing with and loving your community is all over the “Sister Pie” cookbook. Just a pages into the book, and you’ll know that these gals are all about taking care of the people (and bellies) around them. The stories are great, but the recipes are crazy good, so much so that I knew I had to share one with you. The salted maple pie was my first bake from the book, and I have a feeling it’s one I’ll be making for years to come.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

With it’s rich, almost chess pie-like filling, equals parts sweet from maple syrup and salty from finishing salt, this salted maple pie satisfies my dessert cravings on so many levels. There’s the buttery, crispy pie crust, the gooey (think Crack Pie from Milkbar) filling, and those perfect little crunches of flaked salt to finish. I shared this pie with a group at our church and I literally had someone come up to hug me because it was so good. If you think food can’t bless the pants off of someone, think again.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

To make it, we start with Sister Pie’s crust. Their classic all-butter pie dough utilizes European style butter which has a higher fat percentage and less water. This means more flake and more flavor in your pie. The crust gets blind-baked until set and starting to turn golden, and in the meanwhile you can prep your filling. Just like with my favorite chocolate chess pie, this pie gets whipped up in a single bowl. Eggs, butter, maple syrup, cream, and a few other ingredients are stirred together until the crust is finished. Pour the filling in and complete the baking process until the filling it barely puffed and only jiggles a little when you shake it. Allow the pie to cool on the counter, about 4 hours, until set. Finish with a sprinkle (or two) of salt.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

This salted maple pie is like a gooey autumnal hug. The flavors are cozy and complex, an extremely satisfying ending to any meal. I hope you’ll give it a try and check out the new “Sister Pie” cookbook! There’s loads of inspiration, both sweet and savory, within its pages and I think it’s one you’ll reach for for years to come. Happy reading, happy baking, and happy Wednesday!

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

If you like this salted maple pie you should check out:

Maple Apple Cake

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch

Mocha Hazelnut Cream Pie

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Cookie Butter Pretzel Mousse 

 

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Salted Maple Pie

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

From the author: 

The Salted Maple Pie is our signature flavor at Sister Pie because it is an homage to the bakeries where I got my professional chops: Momofuku Milk Bar in Manhattan and Four & Twenty Blackbirds in Brooklyn. It is reminiscent of the addictive quality of both Milk Bar’s Crack Pie and Four & Twenty’s Salty Honey Pie. We created our own version of a classic chess filling with robust Grade B maple syrup from Imlay City, Michigan and highlighted with local heavy cream, eggs, stone-ground yellow cornmeal, and light brown sugar. On Saturdays at the shop, we’ll buy applewood-smoked bacon from the market to crisp up in the oven right before opening. It’s a match made in pancake breakfast heaven.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1⁄2 cup plus 2 tablespoons (1 1⁄4 sticks) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 1 cup Grade B maple syrup
  • 3⁄4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1⁄4 cup fine yellow cornmeal
  • Heaping 1⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 3⁄4 cup heavy cream, at room temperature
  • 11⁄4 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • One 9-inch crust made with All-Butter Pie Dough, blind baked and cooled (see below)
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • Flaky sea salt, for sprinkling top

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F.
  2. Make the filling: In a medium bowl, combine the melted butter and maple syrup. Whisk in the brown sugar, cornmeal, and kosher salt.
  3. Crack the eggs and yolk into another medium bowl. Add the cream and vanilla and whisk until combined.
  4. Slowly pour the egg mixture into the maple mixture and whisk just until combined.
  5. Place the blind-baked shell on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush the crimped edge with the beaten egg. Pour the maple filling into the pie shell until it reaches the bottom of the crimps.
  6. Transfer the baking sheet with the pie on it to the oven and bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the edges are puffed and the center jiggles only slightly when shaken. It will continue to set as it cools.
  7. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and transfer the pie to a wire rack to cool for 4 to 6 hours. Once fully cooled and at room temperature, sprinkle generously with flaky sea salt, slice into 6 to 8 pieces, and serve.
  8. Store leftover pie, well wrapped in plastic wrap or under a pie dome, at room temperature for up to 3 days.
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All-Butter Pie Dough

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

From the author: 

This is our go-to dough, and it’s how each pie begins. Every pie baker, professional or at home, seems to have an opinion on the best combination of fats for the flakiest crust—is it lard, shortening, butter, or a mix? Our basic dough is a pure and simple ode to unsalted butter and all-purpose flour—we think it produces the best-tasting, lightest, flakiest pie crust.

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 1 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 21⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted European-style butter, straight from the fridge
  • 1⁄2 cup ice-cold water-vinegar mixture (see below), or more if needed

Instructions

In a large stainless steel bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt and stir to mix well. Place the sticks of butter in the bowl and coat on all sides with the flour mixture. Using a bench scraper, cut the butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes. Work quickly to separate the cubes with your hands until they are all lightly coated in flour. Grab that bench scraper once again and cut each cube in half. I always tell my pie dough students that it’s unnecessary to actually cut each cube perfectly in half, but it’s a good idea to break up the butter enough so that you can be super-efficient when it’s pastry blender time.

It’s pastry blender time! Switch to the pastry blender and begin to cut in the butter with one hand while turning the bowl with the other. It’s important not to aim for the same spot at the bottom of the bowl with each stroke of the pastry blender, but to actually slice through butter every time to maximize efficiency. When the pastry blender clogs up, carefully clean it out with your fingers (watch out, it bites!) or a butter knife and use your hands to toss the ingredients a bit. Continue to blend and turn until the largest pieces are the size and shape of peas and the rest of the mixture feels and looks freakishly similar to canned Parmesan cheese.

At this point, add the water-vinegar mixture all at once, and switch back to the bench scraper. Scrape as much of the mixture as you can from one side of the bowl to the other, until you can’t see visible pools of liquid anymore. Now it’s hand time. Scoop up as much of the mixture as you can, and use the tips of your fingers (and a whole lot of pressure) to press it back down onto the rest of the ingredients. Rotate the bowl a quarter-turn and repeat. Scoop, press, and turn. With each fold, your intention is to be quickly forming the mixture into one cohesive mass. Remember

to incorporate any dry, floury bits that have congregated at the bottom of the bowl, and once those are completely gone and the dough is formed, it’s time to stop.

Remove the dough from the bowl, place it on a lightly floured counter, and use your bench scraper to divide it into two equal pieces. Gently pat each into a 2-inch-thick disc, working quickly to seal any broken edges before wrapping them tightly in a double layer of plastic wrap. If you’re portioning for a lattice-topped pie, shape one half into a 2-inch-thick disc and the other half into a 6 by 3-inch rectangle. Refrigerate the dough for at least 2 hours or, ideally, overnight. When you go to roll out the crust, you want the discs to feel as hard and cold as the butter did when you removed it from the fridge to make the dough. This will make the roll-out way easier.

You can keep the pie dough in the fridge for a few days or in the freezer for up to 1 year. If frozen, remove the dough and place it in the refrigerator to thaw one full day before you intend to use it. If you’re planning to make only one single-crust pie, wrap the discs separately and place one in the freezer.

To Blind-Bake:

  1. Preheat your oven to 450°F with the rack on the lowest level. Remove the pie crust from the freezer, tear off a square of aluminum foil that is slightly larger than the pie shell, and gently fit it into the frozen crust. Fill the crust with the dried beans (they should come all the way up to the crimps) and place the pie pan on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake for 25 to 27 minutes. Check for doneness by peeling up a piece of foil—the crimps should be light golden brown. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack. After 6 minutes, carefully remove the foil and beans. You did it! You are now ready to fill the pie.

Notes

For the water/vinegar mixture, fill a 1-cup liquid measuring cup about halfway with ice, then add water and 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar.

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche by Wood and Spoon blog. This is an all-butter pie crust filled with a cheesy quiche! Milk, parmesan, and cheddar are the dairy and fresh cooked vegetables and herbs are the filling. What to do with leftover vegetables and meat? Chop it and bake into this wonderful quiche! Sausage, chicken, bacon, or other vegetables would be a welcome addition for this dish that is great for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood. recipe

Today’s recipe is a roasted summer vegetable quiche, also known as your new throw-all-your-leftovers-into-a-one-dish meal. This is the no-frills, adapt-as-you-wish type of dish that you can enjoy as breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Truly, if it gets any simpler than this, I don’t want to know.

This roasted summer vegetable quiche came out of a desire to use up all of my fresh produce. All summer long we have subscribed to a farmer’s market basket, and as a result, our fridge has been stocked with some seriously random (albeit delicious) produce. Some weeks I’d have a baby eggplant, a bag of okra, a handful of greens, and a pint of tomatoes. Other weeks they’d deliver me a  Ziploc full of banana peppers, three giant zucchini, and fresh oregano. At the end of the week, I’d scrape together all the leftovers in my fridge and scour the Internet for a clue on what to do with them.

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche by Wood and Spoon blog. This is an all-butter pie crust filled with a cheesy quiche! Milk, parmesan, and cheddar are the dairy and fresh cooked vegetables and herbs are the filling. What to do with leftover vegetables and meat? Chop it and bake into this wonderful quiche! Sausage, chicken, bacon, or other vegetables would be a welcome addition for this dish that is great for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood. recipe

This roasted summer vegetable quiche is the answer to all those leftovers. Nearly any forgotten tomato, chicken breast, or leftover sausage link would find a home nestled inside a buttery, flaky pie crust. If you’re in a dinnertime rut or just need to clean your fridge out, I really think that quiche is the answer!

To make this roasted summer vegetable quiche, we start with the crust. I’ve switched out my trusty, all-time favorite pie crust for an all-butter pastry. You can make this ahead of time, storing in the fridge or freezer prior to use. If you use a tart dish like I did, you’ll want to make sure you roll your dough out large enough to build the edge of the crust up an inch out of the pan. I find that pie dough shrinks pretty easily, particularly when using glass or ceramic dishes like I did. Fit the dough into the pan and par-bake until the crust is set and ready to receive the filling.

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche by Wood and Spoon blog. This is an all-butter pie crust filled with a cheesy quiche! Milk, parmesan, and cheddar are the dairy and fresh cooked vegetables and herbs are the filling. What to do with leftover vegetables and meat? Chop it and bake into this wonderful quiche! Sausage, chicken, bacon, or other vegetables would be a welcome addition for this dish that is great for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood. recipe

The filling is just about as easy as it sounds! The eggs and dairy serve as the glue, holding together all the little morsels of savory veggies and meats your heart desires. Whisk four eggs with one cup of milk, salt and pepper, and a little bit of seasoning as well. I used cheddar and parmesan for my quiche, but you can really use whatever kind of melted shredded goodness you have on hand. Goat cheese, feta, and mozzarella would be killer here as well, just keep your proportions true to the original recipe and you’ll be in good shape. 

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche by Wood and Spoon blog. This is an all-butter pie crust filled with a cheesy quiche! Milk, parmesan, and cheddar are the dairy and fresh cooked vegetables and herbs are the filling. What to do with leftover vegetables and meat? Chop it and bake into this wonderful quiche! Sausage, chicken, bacon, or other vegetables would be a welcome addition for this dish that is great for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood. recipe

For this roasted summer vegetable quiche, I included 2 cups of cooked veggies. You can use 2 cups of just about any filling your heart desires, but it is important that it’s already been cooked. Vegetables and meats will often release a whole lot of juices which could attribute to a watery or undercooked mess. For convenience, I’ve given instructions on how to roast a pan of summer veggies below.

Bake the quiche in the oven until the crust and filling have begun to bronze. Serve warm with a fresh salad or even just on it’s own! This roasted summer vegetable quiche should be as easy to serve as it is to make.

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche by Wood and Spoon blog. This is an all-butter pie crust filled with a cheesy quiche! Milk, parmesan, and cheddar are the dairy and fresh cooked vegetables and herbs are the filling. What to do with leftover vegetables and meat? Chop it and bake into this wonderful quiche! Sausage, chicken, bacon, or other vegetables would be a welcome addition for this dish that is great for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood. recipe

I’m sharing today’s recipe with a bunch of other bloggers who are featuring tomato-filled foods on their sites! Thank you to Annie, Rebecca and Ruth for hosting this #wesaytomatoes round-up. Be sure to check out their site for the full list of recipes. I hope you enjoy this savory treat today and come back next week when we resume the onslaught of sugary treats. Love to y’all! 

If you like this roasted summer vegetable quiche you should check out:

Tomato Olive Rolls

Tomato Galette with Basil Pesto and Feta

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie

Buttermilk Biscuits with Pepper Bacon, Cheddar, and Egg

 

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Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche

Roasted Summer Vegetable Quiche by Wood and Spoon blog. This is an all-butter pie crust filled with a cheesy quiche! Milk, parmesan, and cheddar are the dairy and fresh cooked vegetables and herbs are the filling. What to do with leftover vegetables and meat? Chop it and bake into this wonderful quiche! Sausage, chicken, bacon, or other vegetables would be a welcome addition for this dish that is great for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Find the recipe and how to on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood. recipe

This roasted summer vegetable quiche is filled with fresh summer veggies, melty cheese, and is served in a flaky all-butter pie crust. Substitute in your favorite filling options in this seriously adaptable dish!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 35
  • Cook Time: 35
  • Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Lunch
  • Cuisine: French
Scale

Ingredients

For the pie dough:

  • 21/2 cups (350 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (230 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • ½ cup ice water, plus more as needed

For the quiche:

  • 1 cup (240 gm) milk
  • 4 large eggs, plus one extra for pie wash
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ½ cup grated parmesan
  • 2 cups roasted vegetables (see notes)
  • ½ cup shredded cheddar cheese

Instructions

To make the pie dough:

  1. Stir the flour, sugar and salt together. Use a pastry cutter or the backs of two forks to cut in the butter until there are pea-sized clumps throughout. Add about 6 tablespoons of the ice water into the flour mixture and begin to stir together. It will likely be dry and require more ice water, so keep adding water 2 tablespoons at a time until a shaggy dough comes together. Dump the mixture out on the counter and use your hands to form the dough into one ball. It should come together as a dough without feeling wet or too tacky. Cut the ball in half and flatten each half into a disk. Wrap each with plastic wrap and store in the fridge for at least an hour or up to a week. You will only need one half of the dough for this quiche. The other can be wrapped in foil and frozen for up to two months.
  2. To prep the quiche:
  3. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Use a floured rolling pin to roll the dough out onto a floured work surface into a round of dough about an inch and a half wider on all sides than your 9” tart dish. Roll the dough back onto the rolling pin and the transfer it to the dish, unrolling as you go. Gently work the dough into the edges of the dish and trim off any excess dough, leaving about an inch of excess hanging on all sides.  Fold the dough under itself and gently crimp the edges into the dish, allowing the top of the dough to extend about ¾-1” above the lip of the dish. This will help keep your crust tall even after baking. If your dough has gotten soft or warm while rolling it out, place it in the freezer for 5-10 minutes to chill up again.
  4. When ready to bake, place a crinkled sheet of parchment paper into the bottom of the crust and fill it with pie weights or uncooked dry beans. Bake in the preheated oven about 10 minutes, then remove the paper and weights and bake for an additional 5-10 minutes, or until the bottom of the crust doesn’t look too wet and soggy. While the crust is baking, begin to assemble your filling.
  5. Whisk together the milk, 4 eggs, garlic powder, salt and pepper. When the crust is finished baking, crack your additional egg in a separate bowl and brush a thin layer of egg white over the bottom of the crust. This will help to keep the crust from becoming soggy. Sprinkle the parmesan evenly over the crust and then spread out the roasted veggies. Sprinkle on the cheddar cheese and then carefully pour the egg mixture into the dish. Be careful to not overflow the tart or the eggs could run over the edge of the crust and into the bottom of your dish. Whisk together the egg from the egg wash and use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer over the exposed crust. Bake in the preheated oven for about 35 minutes or until the top is golden and the center is no longer jiggly. Serve warm or reheat individual slices in the toaster oven!

Notes

  • To roast your own veggies at home, cut a mixture of vegetables (I use eggplant, tomatoes, onion, bell peppers, and squash) into ½” sized pieces. You’ll need about 6 cups fresh vegetables to make about 2 cups roasted vegetables. Toss the chopped veggies with 3 tablespoons of olive oil on a large rimmed sheet pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and roast at 420 for about 20-25 minutes, tossing every 8 minutes or so, until the vegetables are tender and beginning to brown around the edges. You can make these in advance and store in the fridge until ready to use in your quiche!
  • As an alternate to the pie wash, you can reserve a small bit of egg white from one of the 4 eggs for the filling. Brush this over the bottom of the quiche and then add the remainder to the filling mixture.

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A simple, fast recipe that takes less than 30 minutes. A quick brown sugar butter and pretzel pie crust filled with a no bake cream cheese cheesecake type filling and topped with fresh strawberries or berries of your choice. Recipe adapted from Bake from Scratch Magazine. Perfect make ahead dessert idea. Thewoodandspoon.com

Hey friends! I’ve got your weekend entertainment round-up here, complete with a few things to read and a bright and cheery strawberry pretzel tart that is just begging to be made.

This week was a cluster in our house, thanks to sick babies, unfinished to-do lists, and an underwhelming amount of time spent making myself looks presentable (Sorry, Brett. I swear I’ll change out of these sweatpants eventually.) Luckily, a few hours spent snuggling with my sick Aimee girl on the couch (read: trying not to let me brain melt from Lysol fumes and watching back to back episodes of “Paw Patrol”), I reacquainted myself with the interwebs and got caught up on what was going on in the world. For example: apparently Donald Trump is president? What? And someone announced the wrong winner for “Best Picture” at the Oscars? And Ryan Gosling is the world’s most perfect human? (Okay, kidding, guys. I’m not that out of touch.) Here’s a few things that have my eye this week:

50 Things We Learned About Feeding Kids in the Past 6 Years

This little article from Bon Appetit Magazine has so many truths in it. If you’re a parent, you have to give it a read. I promise you’ll identify with something. I’d like to add a few of my own learned lessons to the list:

  1. A tub of baby wipes is a legitimate tableware item.
  2. No one will known that there is Crown Royale in your water if you are drinking it from a Yeti cup.
  3. Squeeze packs counts as vegetable servings.
  4. (More seriously) Find a reason to celebrate at least once a week. Set a date and make a mealtime a party. It’s good for morale.

March Madness

March Madness starts next week! Ok, ok, I know that audience for this blog is primarily women aged 25-34, but it would be entirely sexist to assume that there aren’t at least a few women out there who are beyond excited to watch some basketball. Everyone likes to watch the University of Kentucky win, AMIRITE? Check out this link to get your bracket filled out before the whole shebang starts. And Go Cay-uts. 

The Piglet

If basketball doesn’t do it for you, maybe cookbooks are more your thing. We are knee deep in the quarterfinal round of Food52’s tournament of cookbooks! 16 notable publishings from this past year face off in a NCAAstyle tournament to determine the best cookbook of the year! I’ve got my money on “Dorie’s Cookies” to take the whole thing.

La Pitchoune

Brett and I have some traveling coming up. I’m not going to tell you where or when we’re going, because, geez, I don’t really know who could be reading this! Maybe some Charles Manson psychopath character has been following this blog for some time just waiting for me to reveal my actual location. SORRY CHARLIE, NOT TODAY. But for future vacay planning purposes, I’m keeping this idea on the back burner: Julia Child’s summer home in Provence France that is now a vacation rental and cooking school. You sleep where she slept, cook where she cooked, and no, this is not a drill. Amazing, right?

Strawberry Pretzel TartStrawberry Pretzel Tart

If you’re planning to make a few treats this weekend, keep this strawberry pretzel tart in mind. This is a brown sugar and pretzel crusted tart, adapted from my favorite pretzel pie crust. It’s filled with a no-bake cheesecake filling of sorts and topped with sliced strawberries. With less than 30 minutes of active prep time and requiring less than 10 ingredients, this strawberry pretzel tart is a cinch to make and quite the looker. With spring strawberries just around the corner, this is the tart you’ll make from now until the very last taste of summer. Count on it.

I adapted this recipe from one printed in the newest issue of Bake from Scratch. Bake from Scratch is a newer publication, dedicated to baking culture and the recipes, bakeries, and movers and shakers that make our world a little bit sweeter. You may remember that I was featured in a previous issue as one of nine baking bloggers to follow in 2017 (!!!), and while I am incredibly honored to have been featured, I’m really just thrilled to have a seat at the table. Getting to bake and write and interact with all of you is more fun than all of the basketball games, cookbooks, Provencial summer homes that the world has to offer.

Keep this strawberry pretzel tart on your list of weekend plans and save a slice for me! Let me know if you’re reading or doing anything extra fun this weekend and take a peek at the links I shared with you! Happy weekend and cheers to you!

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

You may also like:

Strawberry Shortcake 

Meyer Lemon Cheesecake

Cookie Butter Mousse

Berry Almond Streusel Pie

Vegan Coconut Lime Ice Cream Cake 

 

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Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Pretzel Tart Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. A simple, fast recipe that takes less than 30 minutes. A quick brown sugar butter and pretzel pie crust filled with a no bake cream cheese cheesecake type filling and topped with fresh strawberries or berries of your choice. Recipe adapted from Bake from Scratch Magazine. Perfect make ahead dessert idea. Thewoodandspoon.com

This strawberry pretzel tart has a sweet and salty pretzel crust, a no-bake cheesecake filling, and is topped with fresh strawberries.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Total Time: 30
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pretzel crust

  • 6 ounces (170 gm) of pretzels
  • 1/4 cup (55 gm) brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup /1 stick (115 gm) of unsalted butter, melted

For the cheesecake filling

  • 18 ounce block (225 gm) of cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 3/4 cup (150 gm) sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup (240 mL) heavy whipping cream
  • 1 lb (450 gm) of strawberries, hulled and sliced

Instructions

To prepare the crust

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a food processor, whiz the pretzels, brown sugar, and salt until the pretzels are crumbs. Add the melted butter and pulse to combine. Alternatively, you can crush the pretzel and stir the other ingredients in to combine.
  3. Pat out the crumbs into the bottom and sides of a 10″ tart pan. Bake in the oven for 8-10 minutes until set. Allow to cool completely before using.

To prepare the cheesecake filling

  1. Beat the cream cheese, sugar, and vanilla on medium speed in the bowl of a stand mixer until smooth and without lumps. Scrape the sides of the bowl as needed.
  2. In a separate bowl, whip the heavy cream using a whisk or whisk attachment of a stand mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold half of the whipped cream into the cream cheese mixture. Once fairly integrated, add the remaining whipped cream and continue to fold until uniform. Take care not to overwork the mixture as this can cause it to lose its fluffiness. Spread the mixture out into the bottom of the cooled tart crust. Allow to chill in the fridge until ready to serve. Once ready to eat, arrange the sliced berries to decorate the top of the tart. Serve chilled.

Notes

 

  • Pretzel crust is best eaten within two days of preparation. It maintains its delicious flavor for several days but the crust can become soggy.

Adapted from: Bake From Scratch

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate wood. Adapted from ina garten's recipe, this pot pie is made in a skillet or dutch oven and it super simple. The pie crust has cheddar cheese and corn Meal, thyme, rosemary, and other herbs and is flaky from butter and shortening- it ends up tasting like a cheese straw! The filling has peas, pearl onions, and carrots and is thickened by a roux made of flour and butter. Find this comfort food recipe to serve for a cold weather family dinner on thewoodandspoo.com . pastry, pie.

Full disclosure- it’s 65 degrees outside. I can almost promise that there’s not a single person in the state of Alabama that is actually interested in eating this cheddar cornmeal chicken pot pie right now. But sometimes we do weird stuff on this blog, so let’s not shy away from it. Let’s just go for it.

Growing up, I can remember eating those personal pot pies that came frozen in a tiny foil pie pan. I’d pick out the peas and hide them under the rim of my bowl until the dog got close enough to eat them out of the palm of my sticky little paw. Now, as an adult, I appreciate pot pie for its comfort. A thick and buttery stew, bubbling with chunks of chicken and diced veggies, all topped with a flaky pie crust, somehow feels cozier than a cable knit sweater. Pot pie dinners feel like home.

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot PieCheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie

This, my friends, it not your average pot pie. This cheddar cornmeal chicken pot pie is the sexy, Southern cousin of the regular ole’ pot pie that swoops in from out of town, steals your boyfriend, and sends everyone running to the store for cheddar cheese so that they can be cool like the new kid. 

The filling, adapted from Ina Garten’s famous recipe, is unassumingly delicious. Carrots, peas, chicken, onions, and enough butter to grease up Danny Zuko and the rest of the T-Birds, comes together in one pot to make a thick and creamy filling. The surprising part of this dish- the part that would make you slap yo mama and sing the Hallelujah Chorus- is the crust. Cornmeal and sharp cheddar cheese are the stars of this show, providing a crunch and creamy tang with every bite. Spiced with black pepper, garlic, and a few savory herbs, the crust on this cheddar cornmeal pot pie is like a pie crust meets Southern cheese straw. If that doesn’t shoot this dish to the top of your dinner menu, then I don’t know anything, apparently. 

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie

Since coming up with this dish, my somewhat critical eater of a husband has said that this is the single best dish in active rotation at our house, so I tend to make it quite a bit. Thankfully, this is a dish that requires little active cooking time, and the cheddar cornmeal crust can be made (or even frozen!) ahead of time. I haven’t tried freezing and reheating a whole pot pie yet, but I have high hopes that there’s potential there. If anyone tries this out, please, do inform. 

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot PieCheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie

If you’re somewhere cold or in need of a dose of comfort food, you should definitely give this cheddar cornmeal chicken pot pie a try. Although, if you’re reading this from Alabama, maybe just wait until we’re back to the regularly scheduled January weather. Or not. No one is judging, so if you make it now, I won’t care. Cheers to you and Happy Tuesday!
Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie
 
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Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie

Cheddar Cornmeal Chicken Pot Pie recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate wood. Adapted from ina garten's recipe, this pot pie is made in a skillet or dutch oven and it super simple. The pie crust has cheddar cheese and corn Meal, thyme, rosemary, and other herbs and is flaky from butter and shortening- it ends up tasting like a cheese straw! The filling has peas, pearl onions, and carrots and is thickened by a roux made of flour and butter. Find this comfort food recipe to serve for a cold weather family dinner on thewoodandspoo.com . pastry, pie.

This cheddar cornmeal chicken pot pie is a traditional chicken pot pie, filled with chicken, carrots, peas, and buttery onions, all topped with a cheddar, cornmeal, black pepper, and herb crust.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Cook Time: 120
  • Total Time: 120
Scale

Ingredients

For the cheddar cornmeal crust

  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder (optional)
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold and cubed
  • 1/3 cup shortening, cold and cubed
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese (I prefer sharp cheddar)
  • 24 tablespoons ice water, more if needed

For the pot pie filling (adapted from Ina Garten)

  • 21/4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 chicken bouillon cube
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 11/2 cups chopped yellow onion
  • 6 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 31/2 cups of diced cooked chicken (I use cooked breast meat)
  • 1 cups small diced carrots
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley leaves (you can substitute a reduced amount of dried parsley)
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1 egg

Instructions

To prepare the cheddar cornmeal crust

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, whiz together the cornmeal, flour, salt, sugar, pepper, and dried herbs and seasonings for about 30 seconds. Add the butter and shortening and pulse in the processor until marble sized clumps form. Add the cheese and pulse a few more times until well combined and the pea sized clumps forms. Add 2 tablespoons of the ice water and pulse until the dough begins to come together, adding an additional tablespoon of water or two if needed. Do no over-process.
  2. Dump the dough crumbles out on to the counter and form into a round, flat disk. Cover in plastic wrap and chill in the fridge for at least an hour, or up to three days.

To prepare the pot pie

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. In a small saucepan, warm the chicken stock and bouillon cube over medium heat, but do not boil. In a large dutch oven or pot, add the butter and onions, cooking over medium heat and stirring frequently until the onions are translucent (about 10 minutes). Add the flour and cook for 2 minutes, stirring all the while. Add the chicken stock mixture and continue to cook while stirring for an additional minute. Once the sauce has thickened, add the chicken, carrots, peas, parsley, 1 teaspoon of salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Mix well and turn the heat off.
  3. Pour the pot pie filling into a 10″ cast iron skillet, or another glass/ceramic baking dish that the pot pie can nearly fill to capacity. Whisk the egg with a tablespoon of water and brush the mixture on the lip of the pan. This will help the pot pie crust to stick to the pan, but is optional and may not be necessary depending on your pan.
  4. On a floured surface, roll your crust out until it is 2 inches wider on all sides than the size of your pan. Be sure to keep your surface and pin well floured to keep from sticking. Transfer the crust to the skillet (I roll the dough loosely back on to the rolling pin and then gently roll it back out on top of the pan), trimming the edges, and crimping them as desired. Brush the top of the pie with the egg wash and cut a few vent slits on the top of the pie. Place in the oven and bake for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the top is golden brown and the filling is bubbling underneath. If the crust or edges are golden or burning before the filling is bubbling, cover loosely with a piece of foil. Allow to set for about 20-30 minutes before serving.

Notes

Notes

  • The herbs and seasonings in the dough are optional but highly recommended as they add tremendous flavor!
  • I have tested many variations of this dough, and this is the one I was most pleased with. I have attempted using all butter, and while the taste is terrific, the texture is not as preferable to me. It’s quite delicate and may be somewhat crumbly crye shaping it for the pot pie lid, but the taste is worth the effort.