maple

Maple Cinnamon Rolls

Maple Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon blog. These sweetened yeast rolls are flavored with maple syrup, filled with cinnamon and brown sugar, and topped with a simple maple flavored butter glaze. These maple rolls make a great fall breakfast or special holiday brunch item. Learn how simple homemade rolls are on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So here we are- the first week of December. What’s that like for you? What are the memories and feelings and thoughts attached to the 31 days we’re entering into?

For many of us, December means holidays and family, celebration and shopping. In our house, Christmas is still so wrapped up in the lights and wonder and hot cocoa-ness of it all, and that, combined with my upcoming book release, has already got us busy and full of anticipation. But for as many of us there are that started December 1st with starry eyes and hearts full of cheer, there are just as many hurting, feeling lonely, and wondering where all the wonder is. Today, at the risk of being way too serious in the opening paragraph of a food blog post, I want you to know this: you are loved, you matter, and you’re welcome to embrace whatever sentiment you need to this year.

Maple Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon blog. These sweetened yeast rolls are flavored with maple syrup, filled with cinnamon and brown sugar, and topped with a simple maple flavored butter glaze. These maple rolls make a great fall breakfast or special holiday brunch item. Learn how simple homemade rolls are on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

So before we’re all gung-ho on cookie exchanges and tacky sweater parties, I want to share these maple cinnamon rolls, a true comfort food recipe, and ask you to take inventory of the people in your life who may need more love this year. Is there someone who needs to feel the glow of your friendship and affection? Share it freely, whether with a card, a coffee date, or a batch of these sweet rolls, and know that your love makes the biggest difference this time of year. The world needs more people who freely offer what they have to the people around them.

Maple Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon blog. These sweetened yeast rolls are flavored with maple syrup, filled with cinnamon and brown sugar, and topped with a simple maple flavored butter glaze. These maple rolls make a great fall breakfast or special holiday brunch item. Learn how simple homemade rolls are on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

Maple Cinnamon Rolls

Ok, phew. If you’ve made it this far in the post- CONGRATULATIONS. Your reward is a yummy, warm, fall-scented twist on one of my all-time favorite treats: these maple cinnamon rolls. Every year, I create a number of sweet roll recipes, because they’re always such a hit. My kids love them, you guys love them, EVERYBODY LOVES THEM. So these maple cinnamon rolls have been a long time coming; after all, few things go hand in hand with breakfast and cinnamon like the comforting flavor of pure maple syrup.

Maple Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon blog. These sweetened yeast rolls are flavored with maple syrup, filled with cinnamon and brown sugar, and topped with a simple maple flavored butter glaze. These maple rolls make a great fall breakfast or special holiday brunch item. Learn how simple homemade rolls are on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

This recipe was adapted from the ever-popular overnight cinnamon rolls . In place of the sugar and brown sugar that ordinarily sweetens the rolls, I’ve used maple syrup. In addition to the cinnamon brown sugar filling, I’ve added a handful of chopped pecans both of texture and flavor. That, plus the ridiculous-delicious maple glaze that goes on top, makes the yummiest addition to our round-up of breakfast all-stars.

Maple Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon blog. These sweetened yeast rolls are flavored with maple syrup, filled with cinnamon and brown sugar, and topped with a simple maple flavored butter glaze. These maple rolls make a great fall breakfast or special holiday brunch item. Learn how simple homemade rolls are on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.

If you’re looking for a fancy treat to love on your friends and family with this year, please consider these maple cinnamon rolls. Hugs to you today and in the days that are coming, and happy baking!

If you like this recipe you should try:

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls
King Cake Cinnamon Rolls
Cookies and Cream Rolls
Mini Cinnamon Rolls
Gingerbread Cinnamon Rolls

Maple Cinnamon Rolls by Wood and Spoon blog. These sweetened yeast rolls are flavored with maple syrup, filled with cinnamon and brown sugar, and topped with a simple maple flavored butter glaze. These maple rolls make a great fall breakfast or special holiday brunch item. Learn how simple homemade rolls are on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood.
Print

Maple Cinnamon Rolls

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

These maple cinnamon rolls feature a cinnamon brown sugar filling, toasted pecans, and loads of cozy maple syrup!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 240
  • Yield: 12 Rolls
  • Category: Breakfast

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 1/2 cup milk, lukewarm
  • 1/2 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted but not too hot
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup real maple syrup
  • 21/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

For the filling:

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • 6 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped pecans

For the frosting:

  • ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons milk

Instructions

To prepare the dough:

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast over top of the lukewarm milk. Allow the yeast to dissolve, about 5 minutes. Stir in the butter, egg, and maple syrup until smooth. Add about half of the flour plus the salt into the yeast mixture and stir until combined. Pour in the remaining flour and knead in the bowl using the dough hook attachment until smooth and slightly tacky, about 7 minutes. If you notice your dough isn’t pulling away from the sides of the bowl or it’s too wet, add flour 1 tablespoon at a time until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and forms a little dough “tornado” around the dough hook. Once done kneading, place the dough into a large lightly greased bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap to double in size, about 1-1/2 hours.
  2. Once the dough has risen, dump it out onto a lightly floured surface. Use a floured rolling pin to roll it into a large rectangle about 11”x21” in size. Pour the melted butter for the filling on top of the rolled out dough and spread it out over top. Combine the cinnamon and brown sugar and sprinkle evenly over the buttered dough. Sprinkle on the chopped pecans as well. Starting with one of the long ends, tightly roll the dough from end to end and pinch the edges together to seal. Cut the dough into about 1-1/2” sections and lay them out spiral side up in a lightly greased sheet pan or baking dish, about 2” apart. Alternatively, you can bake them in greased muffin tins as well. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise again, about 40 minutes.
  3. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Once preheated, bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until the edges are barely golden and the internal temp of a roll is 190 degrees. Remove from the oven and prepare your frosting.

To prepare the frosting:

  1. Stir the butter, maple syrup, salt, and powdered sugar together with an electric hand mixer. Add milk 1 tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. Spread the frosting over the warm rolls and enjoy!

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can’t wait to see what you’ve made!

Maple Cream Tart

Maple Cream Tart by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple cream tart made with a biscoff cookie and pecan crust, a maple cream pie filling, and a homemade maple caramel. This sweet and salty holiday dessert can be made ahead and feeds a crowd. Learn how to make this beautiful fall dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

What. A. Week.

If the radio silence around here and social media has given any wonder as to whether or not this website even exists anymore, let me just reassure you: we’re still alive. Last week, Hurricane Zeta passed through our town and absolutely wreaked havoc. We remained safe in our storm shelter and our house was relatively unaffected, but the landscape of our sweet city went through the ringer. At the present moment, 6 days later, we are still without power, and nearly every street is littered with down power lines, fallen trees, and various limbs and brush that have been gathered by home and business owners alike. As someone who lived in central Florida for 10+ years, I can say that the damage we’re experiencing is some of the worst I’ve seen, and man, I’m just grateful we’re all okay.

Maple Cream Tart by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple cream tart made with a biscoff cookie and pecan crust, a maple cream pie filling, and a homemade maple caramel. This sweet and salty holiday dessert can be made ahead and feeds a crowd. Learn how to make this beautiful fall dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

I’m eager for us to catch up on all that we’ve missed (hello, election!) and the events of the past couple of weeks (birthdays! holidays! big life stuff!), but for now, I want to share this maple cream tart with you. With a spiced pecan and cookie crust and a seriously rich and cream filling, this is a decadent autumn treat that would make a great addition to your upcoming holiday tables. Let me tell you how to make it!

Maple Cream Tart by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple cream tart made with a biscoff cookie and pecan crust, a maple cream pie filling, and a homemade maple caramel. This sweet and salty holiday dessert can be made ahead and feeds a crowd. Learn how to make this beautiful fall dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Tart

First we’ll start with the crust. Biscoff cookies are ground to a crumb and tossed with some pecans, butter, and brown sugar. YUM. After a quick bake in the oven, the cream filling is made on a stovetop using maple syrup, eggs, and milk. Spread the filling in the prepared shell and allow it to cool completely or overnight in the fridge.

Maple Cream Tart by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple cream tart made with a biscoff cookie and pecan crust, a maple cream pie filling, and a homemade maple caramel. This sweet and salty holiday dessert can be made ahead and feeds a crowd. Learn how to make this beautiful fall dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Garnishing this maple cream tart is a cinch. I love to up the ante with a little homemade maple caramel. Here, all the texture and decadence of caramel combines with the nuanced flavor of maple syrup. It makes a seriously rich topping for this otherwise humble tart. I love to added chopped salted pecans for a little texture too, but you can go with whatever suits your taste!

Maple Cream Tart by Wood and Spoon. This is a simple cream tart made with a biscoff cookie and pecan crust, a maple cream pie filling, and a homemade maple caramel. This sweet and salty holiday dessert can be made ahead and feeds a crowd. Learn how to make this beautiful fall dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Hugs to y’all. I hope you’re doing well and settling into the weirdness that is November 2020. I’ll see you next week with another fall recipe!

If you like this maple cream tart you should try:


Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream
Maple Oatmeal Biscuits
Salted Maple Pie
Maple Bacon Scones

Print

Maple Cream Tart

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

This maple cream tart features a biscoff pecan crust, a maple cream filling, and a quick and easy stovetop maple caramel.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 25
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 120
  • Yield: 9 Servings
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 24 Biscoff cookies (186 gm), crushed to crumbs
  • 1 cup finely chopped pecans (90 gm)
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

For the filling:

  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¾ cup maple syrup
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

For the maple caramel:

  • 1 cup maple syrup (not imitation)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup heavy whipping cream
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Instructions

To prepare the crust:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the cookie crumbs, pecans, and melted butter. Stir to combine and press into the sides and bottom of a 9” tart part with a removable bottom. Bake in the preheated oven for about 9 minutes or until set. Allow to cool while you prepare your filling.

To prepare the filling:

  1. In a medium saucepan, whisk together the cornstarch and salt. Add the milk, maple syrup, and egg yolks and stir to combine. Turn the heat to medium heat and bring to a bubble, stirring all along. Once thickened to a pudding consistency, remove from heat and place in a heat-safe bowl. Place a sheet of plastic wrap directly on top to prevent a skin from forming and place in the fridge to cool completely. 
  2. Once cooled at least to room temperature, whip the cream and sugar together until stiff peaks form. Stir the maple pudding; if you notice any clumps, you can push the pudding through a sieve to remove any clumps. Fold the whipped cream and maple pudding together until combined and spread into the prepared pie crust. Garnish with additional cookie crumbs or pecans. Allow to set up in the fridge while you prepare the caramel.

To prepare the caramel:

  1. Bring the maple syrup to a boil in a medium saucepan and continue cooking without stirring until a candy thermometer reaching 230 degrees Fahrenheit (soft ball stage). Remove the pan from heat and carefully stir in the butter, cream and salt. Place in a heat-safe jar or container to cool slightly before serving with slices of the pie. 

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can’t wait to see what you’ve made!

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream by Wood and Spoon. This is a graham cracker and pecan salted crust baked and filled with a no bake pumpkin cream cheese filling. Flavored with brown sugar and cinnamon, this pie is cool but totally fall. Top the whole thing off with toasty pecans and maple whipped cream. Give this autumn dessert a try for Thanksgiving or upcoming dinner parties! Recipe by Kate wood on thewoodandspoon.com

Let’s cut to the chase: it’s high time that we get started on this fall thing. In the spirit of turtlenecks and jewel tones and crunchy leaves, today I’ll be chatting about this super simple pumpkin pecan tart that just screams, “AUTUMN!” As a bonus, we’re also going to share some recipes from a number of other bloggers who are sporting pumpkin goods on their sites today. Talk about a happy Monday, huh!?

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream by Wood and Spoon. This is a graham cracker and pecan salted crust baked and filled with a no bake pumpkin cream cheese filling. Flavored with brown sugar and cinnamon, this pie is cool but totally fall. Top the whole thing off with toasty pecans and maple whipped cream. Give this autumn dessert a try for Thanksgiving or upcoming dinner parties! Recipe by Kate wood on thewoodandspoon.com

Pumpkin Pecan Tart

So first up is the pumpkin pecan tart. I’m all for recipes that can be thrown together in a pinch. There’s something very satisfying about taking on a baking challenge, but sometimes we need a few recipes in our back pocket that taste terrific without hours of stressful work. I have a feeling that this pumpkin pecan tart will be your go-to for the fall.

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream by Wood and Spoon. This is a graham cracker and pecan salted crust baked and filled with a no bake pumpkin cream cheese filling. Flavored with brown sugar and cinnamon, this pie is cool but totally fall. Top the whole thing off with toasty pecans and maple whipped cream. Give this autumn dessert a try for Thanksgiving or upcoming dinner parties! Recipe by Kate wood on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Tart

Let’s get started with the crust. Here, we use a simple graham cracker crust that is elevated with the addition of finely chopped pecans and the just-right amount of butter. The pecans add ridiculous flavor to the otherwise simple crust and they’re a pretty perfect combo with the pumpkin.

The filling is a cream cheese and canned pumpkin base with not a whole lot extra added. Of course there’s cinnamon, some pumpkin pie spice, and sugar, but other than that the ingredients here are minimal. Simply cream together the pumpkin and cream cheese, add the remaining ingredients, and smooth the whole lot of it into the pie crust. That’s it!

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream by Wood and Spoon. This is a graham cracker and pecan salted crust baked and filled with a no bake pumpkin cream cheese filling. Flavored with brown sugar and cinnamon, this pie is cool but totally fall. Top the whole thing off with toasty pecans and maple whipped cream. Give this autumn dessert a try for Thanksgiving or upcoming dinner parties! Recipe by Kate wood on thewoodandspoon.com

A Few Tips

For best results with this pumpkin pecan tart, I recommend filling the crust and finishing off the toppings just before serving. I opted to top the whole thing with a maple whipped cream, but you could certainly bypass that step if you’d prefer. I spooned the whipped cream into a piping bag (or a large plastic bag with the end snipped off!) and squeezed little dollops of fluff all over the pie, but if you’d prefer a simple smear that would work too. Use any leftover pecans or graham cracker crumbs to garnish the top for a pretty finish, and it will be so cute that I promise your friends won’t guess how easy this little guy was to make.

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream by Wood and Spoon. This is a graham cracker and pecan salted crust baked and filled with a no bake pumpkin cream cheese filling. Flavored with brown sugar and cinnamon, this pie is cool but totally fall. Top the whole thing off with toasty pecans and maple whipped cream. Give this autumn dessert a try for Thanksgiving or upcoming dinner parties! Recipe by Kate wood on thewoodandspoon.com

This pumpkin pecan tart would make an excellent addition at your next supper club, Thanksgiving dinner, or Sunday afternoon lunch. I love how quickly the treat comes together and the flavors are so seriously autumnal that it just feels right. In the event that pumpkin tarts aren’t your thing (okay, but seriously, who even are you?) my friend Sara has rounded up a whole bunch of other bloggers who are sharing pumpkin recipes today as well. There’s everything from pumpkin babka to pumpkin couscous to pumpkin granola- almost 70 recipes in all! Check out the whole list here and get in the swing of fall this week. I think it’s about time.

Have an enormously joyful and fulfilling week and stop by here again on Friday. I may or may not be sharing another killer recipe on Friday (hint: I am). Happy Monday and happy baking!

If you like this pumpkin pecan tart you should check out:

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

Pecan Pumpkin Cake with Burnt Sugar Frosting

Pumpkin Yeast Bread

Pumpkin Pull-Apart Bread

Print

Pumpkin Pecan Tart with Maple Whipped Cream

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

3.5 from 2 reviews

This pumpkin pecan tart has a no-bake filling and a maple whipped cream topping. Served chilled, this dessert is a simple treat for fall gatherings!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 25
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 9
  • Category: dessert

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 1 cup (99 gm) graham cracker crumbs
  • ¾ cup (100 gm) finely chopped pecans
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 7 tablespoons (100 gm) unsalted butter, melted

For the filling:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) sugar
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) brown sugar
  • 10 ounces pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice

For the maple whipped cream:

  • 1 cups (240 gm) heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

To make the crust:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the graham cracker crumbs, pecans, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Add the butter and stir to combine. Press the wet crumbs into the bottom and sides of a 9” tart pan with a removable bottom. I like to press a small amount of crumbs up the length of the sides first and then press the remaining into the bottom. Bake in the preheated oven for 8-10 minutes or until the edges are turning gold and the bottom is set. Allow to cool completely.

To make the filling:

  1. Beat the cream cheese, sugar, and brown sugar in a large bowl on medium speed until smooth, about 1 minutes. Add the pumpkin puree, vanilla, and pumpkin pie spice and beat on low just until combines. Spread the mixture into the cooled crust and allow the pie to set in a cold fridge, about 2 hours.

To make the whipped cream:

  1. Whip the heavy whipping cream on medium-low speed until frothy and barely beginning to thicken. Add the maple syrup and vanilla extract and bean until stiff peaks. Spread or pipe the cream onto the prepared pie and serve immediately!

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Salted Maple Pie

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

I can’t claim the recipe for this salted maple pie as my own, but I love it so much that it feels like my child. This pie, straight from a brand-spanking new book called “Sister Pie” is a winning treat that your falls need. Trust me.

Something I’ve been learning about over the last five or so years of my life is how to celebrate others. There was a period of time in my life where my own insecurity prevented me from whole-heartedly cheering on the people around me. I guess I thought that if someone else was successful, hitting milestones faster than me, or achieving things I wanted in my own life it would somehow diminish my own gifts and the good things in my life. Like someone else’s advancement meant I was stuck behind. Obviously that type of mentality was gross and damaging for a number of reasons, but I think the thing I missed out on most was the opportunity to share in the joy of someone else’s successes.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Small Town Life

One of my favorite things about life in a small town is how friends, neighbors, and even complete strangers can come to feel like family. In the confines of a tiny city, it’s easy to recognize how closely your life is knitted to the people around you and wanting the best for them becomes an absolute no brainer. Their struggles become your struggles, their joys become your joys, and the triumphs and blessings in their lives will eventually trickle down to affect yours in a positive way too.

When one person succeeds in a small town, everyone eventually shares in that reward, and I’ve found that taking part in their stories, investing passion and love into the things that are important to them, almost always feels like a shared victory in the end. This way of living, this crazy love and support for the people around you, is is one of the most heart-filling things I’ve ever experienced in my life, and if you’ve felt it too, I bet you’d agree.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Sister Pie

This notion of sharing with and loving your community is all over the “Sister Pie” cookbook. Reading the book, you’ll know that these gals are all about taking care of the people (and bellies) around them. The stories are great, but the recipes are crazy good, so much so that I knew I had to share one with you. The salted maple pie was my first bake from the book, and I have a feeling it’s one I’ll be making for years to come.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Salted Maple Pie

With it’s rich, almost chess pie-like filling, equals parts sweet from maple syrup and salty from finishing salt, this salted maple pie satisfies my dessert cravings on so many levels. There’s the buttery crust, the gooey (think Crack Pie from Milkbar) filling, and those perfect crunches of salt. I shared this pie with a group at our church and I literally had someone come up to hug me because it was so good. If you think food can’t bless the pants off of someone, think again.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

Making the Pie

To make it, we start with Sister Pie’s crust. Their classic all-butter pie dough utilizes European style butter. Euro butter has a higher fat percentage and less water. This means more flake and more flavor in your pie. The crust blind-bakes until set and starting to turn golden. In the meanwhile you can prep your filling. Just like with my favorite chocolate chess pie, this pie gets whipped up in a single bowl. Eggs, butter, maple syrup, and cream stir together. Pour the filling in and complete the baking process until the filling it barely puffed and only jiggles a little. Allow the pie to cool on the counter, about 4 hours, until set. Finish with a sprinkle (or two) of salt.

Salted Maple Pie by Wood and Spoon. This is a decadent chess pie recipe from Sister Pie in Detroit! Made with eggs, maple syrup, and a buttery flaky crust, this pie is a sweet and salty lover's dream! Perfect for the fall and holidays, this pie would be at home on any Thanksgiving table. Find the recipe and how to for par-baking crust and knowing when this pie is done on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate wood.

This salted maple pie is like a gooey autumnal hug. The flavors are cozy and complex, an extremely satisfying ending to any meal. I hope you’ll give it a try and check out the new “Sister Pie” cookbook! There’s loads of inspiration, both sweet and savory, within its pages; I think it’s one you’ll reach for for years to come. Happy reading, happy baking, and happy Wednesday!

If you like this salted maple pie you should check out:

Maple Apple Cake

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch

Mocha Hazelnut Cream Pie

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Cookie Butter Pretzel Mousse 

Print

Salted Maple Pie

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

From the author: 

The Salted Maple Pie is our signature flavor at Sister Pie because it is an homage to the bakeries where I got my professional chops: Momofuku Milk Bar in Manhattan and Four & Twenty Blackbirds in Brooklyn. It is reminiscent of the addictive quality of both Milk Bar’s Crack Pie and Four & Twenty’s Salty Honey Pie. We created our own version of a classic chess filling with robust Grade B maple syrup from Imlay City, Michigan and highlighted with local heavy cream, eggs, stone-ground yellow cornmeal, and light brown sugar. On Saturdays at the shop, we’ll buy applewood-smoked bacon from the market to crisp up in the oven right before opening. It’s a match made in pancake breakfast heaven.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 9
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 1⁄2 cup plus 2 tablespoons (1 1⁄4 sticks) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 1 cup Grade B maple syrup
  • 3⁄4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1⁄4 cup fine yellow cornmeal
  • Heaping 1⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 3⁄4 cup heavy cream, at room temperature
  • 11⁄4 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • One 9-inch crust made with All-Butter Pie Dough, blind baked and cooled (see below)
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • Flaky sea salt, for sprinkling top

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F.
  2. Make the filling: In a medium bowl, combine the melted butter and maple syrup. Whisk in the brown sugar, cornmeal, and kosher salt.
  3. Crack the eggs and yolk into another medium bowl. Add the cream and vanilla and whisk until combined.
  4. Slowly pour the egg mixture into the maple mixture and whisk just until combined.
  5. Place the blind-baked shell on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush the crimped edge with the beaten egg. Pour the maple filling into the pie shell until it reaches the bottom of the crimps.
  6. Transfer the baking sheet with the pie on it to the oven and bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the edges are puffed and the center jiggles only slightly when shaken. It will continue to set as it cools.
  7. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and transfer the pie to a wire rack to cool for 4 to 6 hours. Once fully cooled and at room temperature, sprinkle generously with flaky sea salt, slice into 6 to 8 pieces, and serve.
  8. Store leftover pie, well wrapped in plastic wrap or under a pie dome, at room temperature for up to 3 days.

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Print

All-Butter Pie Dough

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

From the author: 

This is our go-to dough, and it’s how each pie begins. Every pie baker, professional or at home, seems to have an opinion on the best combination of fats for the flakiest crust—is it lard, shortening, butter, or a mix? Our basic dough is a pure and simple ode to unsalted butter and all-purpose flour—we think it produces the best-tasting, lightest, flakiest pie crust.

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 1
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 21⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted European-style butter, straight from the fridge
  • 1⁄2 cup ice-cold water-vinegar mixture (see below), or more if needed

Instructions

In a large stainless steel bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt and stir to mix well. Place the sticks of butter in the bowl and coat on all sides with the flour mixture. Using a bench scraper, cut the butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes. Work quickly to separate the cubes with your hands until they are all lightly coated in flour. Grab that bench scraper once again and cut each cube in half. I always tell my pie dough students that it’s unnecessary to actually cut each cube perfectly in half, but it’s a good idea to break up the butter enough so that you can be super-efficient when it’s pastry blender time.

It’s pastry blender time! Switch to the pastry blender and begin to cut in the butter with one hand while turning the bowl with the other. It’s important not to aim for the same spot at the bottom of the bowl with each stroke of the pastry blender, but to actually slice through butter every time to maximize efficiency. When the pastry blender clogs up, carefully clean it out with your fingers (watch out, it bites!) or a butter knife and use your hands to toss the ingredients a bit. Continue to blend and turn until the largest pieces are the size and shape of peas and the rest of the mixture feels and looks freakishly similar to canned Parmesan cheese.

At this point, add the water-vinegar mixture all at once, and switch back to the bench scraper. Scrape as much of the mixture as you can from one side of the bowl to the other, until you can’t see visible pools of liquid anymore. Now it’s hand time. Scoop up as much of the mixture as you can, and use the tips of your fingers (and a whole lot of pressure) to press it back down onto the rest of the ingredients. Rotate the bowl a quarter-turn and repeat. Scoop, press, and turn. With each fold, your intention is to be quickly forming the mixture into one cohesive mass. Remember

to incorporate any dry, floury bits that have congregated at the bottom of the bowl, and once those are completely gone and the dough is formed, it’s time to stop.

Remove the dough from the bowl, place it on a lightly floured counter, and use your bench scraper to divide it into two equal pieces. Gently pat each into a 2-inch-thick disc, working quickly to seal any broken edges before wrapping them tightly in a double layer of plastic wrap. If you’re portioning for a lattice-topped pie, shape one half into a 2-inch-thick disc and the other half into a 6 by 3-inch rectangle. Refrigerate the dough for at least 2 hours or, ideally, overnight. When you go to roll out the crust, you want the discs to feel as hard and cold as the butter did when you removed it from the fridge to make the dough. This will make the roll-out way easier.

You can keep the pie dough in the fridge for a few days or in the freezer for up to 1 year. If frozen, remove the dough and place it in the refrigerator to thaw one full day before you intend to use it. If you’re planning to make only one single-crust pie, wrap the discs separately and place one in the freezer.

To Blind-Bake:

  1. Preheat your oven to 450°F with the rack on the lowest level. Remove the pie crust from the freezer, tear off a square of aluminum foil that is slightly larger than the pie shell, and gently fit it into the frozen crust. Fill the crust with the dried beans (they should come all the way up to the crimps) and place the pie pan on a baking sheet. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake for 25 to 27 minutes. Check for doneness by peeling up a piece of foil—the crimps should be light golden brown. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack. After 6 minutes, carefully remove the foil and beans. You did it! You are now ready to fill the pie.

Notes

For the water/vinegar mixture, fill a 1-cup liquid measuring cup about halfway with ice, then add water and 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar.

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Maple Bacon Scones

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

This is it, the eye of the proverbial hurricane. We are in the midst of those few short days sandwiched in between turkey feasts and Christmas morning- that time of year when the to-do lists are lengthy and daylight is fleeting. To help us survive, I’m sharing these maple bacon scones, a simple and comforting dish that we all can rally behind.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

An Update on Thanksgiving

Last week was basically a grotesque parade of meals and cocktails and leftover turkey sandwiches. Don’t get me wrong- I like to eat just as much as the next person, but at some point, my gullet (and the button on my blue jeans) just scream, “NO MORE!” We started the week with a few dinners out with friends, and on Thursday morning, we fulfilled our American duty by demolishing the annual Thanksgiving feast. We ate an array of biscuits and green beans and casseroles, and because Thanksgiving lunch is the meal that keeps on giving, we later enjoyed turkey and bacon sandwiches.

By Friday, I felt like I had eaten a baby or an entire bucket of KFC chicken. I felt like I had devoured three meals back to back at a Walt Disney World buffet and at any moment could burst in a disgusting explosion of gravy and cream of mushroom soup. My mother tells me this is a normal post-Thanksgiving feeling, but my Spanx would say otherwise.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

After Feasting, We Football

Following our two-day binge fest, we traveled to Auburn, AL on Saturday to watch the Iron Bowl. For anyone who doesn’t live in Alabama or who couldn’t give two craps about college football (raises hand), the Iron Bowl is an annual football game between the University of Alabama and Auburn University. Being married to a rabid Auburn fan means that I participate in the festivities by eating chicken wings in my tailgate chair, drinking Crown Royale and Sprite from a gas station cup, and cheering at the game.

While I am no more interested in football than I am, say, Nascar or an international chess match, I do enjoy attending with Brett because he loves it so much. Sometimes it’s fun to scream and clap and cheer like I know what I’m doing. Plus, someone has to be there to resuscitate Brett if he loses his mind on a poor call from the referee.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Maple Bacon Scones

So that brings us to today. Bloated, tired, and scratchy-throated, this girl is wiped out. I’m sticking with soup and salad for the foreseeable future, unless of course someone wants to bring me another turkey and bacon sandwich on some pumpkin bread, because that mess is delicious. But I digress. Before we dive head first into a powdered sugar cloud of cookies and cocoa and carols, let’s celebrate the last of this fall season with some warm and cozy maple bacon scones.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

With a tender crumb, crisp edges, and a delightfully sweet and salty flavor, these maple bacon scones are a dream. My husband always says that everything is made better with bacon, and when it comes to these scones, I couldn’t agree more. The recipe was adapted from a new favorite, these chocolate coffee almond scones, and I was delighted that the butter-based treat transitioned from sweet to savory so seamlessly. I made and froze several batches throughout the testing process, and for weeks these maple bacon scones were toasted for a delightful breakfast that tasted fresh from the oven.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Scones

To make these maple bacon scones, we start with the meats. Fry up some thick bacon of your choice until crisp. I prefer applewood smoked bacon. Save the grease for another day and chop up the rest for the scones. Combine the dry ingredients, flour, seasoning, and baking powder, in a large bowl. Next, cut in cold chunks of unsalted butter. Stir in the diced bacon before pouring in the heavy cream and maple syrup. Work quickly to combine the dough, but be sure to not overwork it. Pat it all out into a 1″ thick round and slice it into 8 wedges. Brush the whole thing with a little more heavy cream before baking in a hot preheated oven.

Maple Bacon Scones by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a sweet and savory breakfast and brunch recipe. Maple syrup sweetens up these smoky bacon filled scones. This is a butter and heavy cream scone with a tender crumb and golden brown edges. Find the recipe for this fall favorite on thewoodandspoon.com

Fresh from the oven, these maple bacon scones are fragrant. Imagine the glorious smoke of bacon combined with the smell of homemade bread and maple syrup; it’s almost too good to describe. These maple bacon scones are crowd-pleasing, the kind of thing you’ll want to serve at breakfasts in the coming months. Give this recipe a try and let me know what you think! They’re certainly worth making room in your belly for.

If you like these maple bacon scones, you should check out:

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Apple Cake

Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches with Pepper Bacon and Cheddar

Print

Maple Bacon Scones

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 1 review

These maple bacon scones are a sweet and salty favorite to serve at breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 8

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (260 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
  • ½ cup (113 gm) unsalted butter, cold and chopped
  • 1 cup cooked, finely chopped crispy bacon
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) maple syrup
  • ¾ cup (180 mL) whipping cream, plus additional for brushing

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, pepper, and onion powder. Use a pastry cutter or the back of two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until pea-sized clumps are throughout. Stir in the bacon. Combine the maple syrup and the whipping cream in a separate bowl and then stir into the dry ingredients, just until evenly incorporated. If a lot of dry ingredients remain in the bottom of the bowl you can add an additional tablespoon of cream, but be sure to not add too much liquid.
  2. Pat the dough out in a ¾” thick circle and place the dough round on a parchment lined baking pan in the freezer to chill for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  3. Once the dough is chilled, cut the dough into 8 wedges but leave the circle of pieces together. Use a pastry brush to brush a thin layer of whipping cream over the scones. Bake in the oven until golden brown around the edges of each scone, about 35 minutes.

Notes

Chilling the dough ensures the scones will rise well. You can skip this step but it isn’t recommended for best outcomes.

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Loosely adapted from King Arthur Flour