meringue

S’mores Cookies

S'mores Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are s'mores inspired thumbprint cookies made with a honey cinnamon cookie, a chocolate filling, and a fluffy toasted marshmallow topping! These thumbprint cookies are a fun fall dessert to enjoy around the holidays or as the weather gets cooler. Learn how to make festive cookies with meringue topping here on thewoodandspoon.com

Last weekend, we had a massive bonfire at our house. The heat, the smoke, and the glowing movements of flames and figures from across the fire reminded me of all my favorite things about fall. While there weren’t any s’mores involved throughout the evening, I knew it was finally time to share this recipe I’d been working on for s’mores cookies: cinnamon and honey thumbprint cookies with a fudgy chocolate filling and a toasted marshmallow topping. These cookies feature all the wonderful flavors of a traditional s’mores in a cute and modernized package of a thumbprint cookie! Let me tell you how to make them.

S'mores Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are s'mores inspired thumbprint cookies made with a honey cinnamon cookie, a chocolate filling, and a fluffy toasted marshmallow topping! These thumbprint cookies are a fun fall dessert to enjoy around the holidays or as the weather gets cooler. Learn how to make festive cookies with meringue topping here on thewoodandspoon.com

You’ve made a thumbprint cookie before, right? Maybe they were peanut butter-flavored or featured a Hershey kiss in the center? You rolled them in sprinkles or sparkling sanding sugar? Maybe you fed them to kids or Santa or holiday party guests? Well, these are not those kind of thumbprints. Instead, here a spiced cookie base is rolled in sugar, sweetened with honey, and filled with a soft and fudgy chocolate ganache filling. The topping, also far from ordinary, is a simple meringue that we toast under a torch or a broiler. These s’mores cookies are not as quick and easy as the thumbprint cookies you grew up on, but I can promise they’re far more delicious.

S'mores Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are s'mores inspired thumbprint cookies made with a honey cinnamon cookie, a chocolate filling, and a fluffy toasted marshmallow topping! These thumbprint cookies are a fun fall dessert to enjoy around the holidays or as the weather gets cooler. Learn how to make festive cookies with meringue topping here on thewoodandspoon.com

Making the Cookies

To make the cookie base, butter, brown sugar, and honey are creamed together until smooth. Eggs and vanilla come next and are followed by the dry ingredients. Rounds of dough are rolled in cinnamon and sugar before be imprinted and baked until set. Once cooled, chocolate chips and butter are combined to create a soft, almost-ganache tasting filling. The chocolate is piped into the craters in each cookie and allowed to set up. Finally comes the marshmallow meringue topping! Egg whites and sugar are whipped until stiff and then piped and toasted onto the cookie. If homemade meringue intimidates you, be sure to check out my tutorial here!

S'mores Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are s'mores inspired thumbprint cookies made with a honey cinnamon cookie, a chocolate filling, and a fluffy toasted marshmallow topping! These thumbprint cookies are a fun fall dessert to enjoy around the holidays or as the weather gets cooler. Learn how to make festive cookies with meringue topping here on thewoodandspoon.com

That’s it for today! S’mores cookies! I hope you guys enjoy and take time to bake up some yummy fall favorites in the coming days. I’ll be back with not one but TWO recipes next week, so stay tuned! Happy Tuesday and Happy Baking!

If you like these s’mores cookies you should try:

S’mores Cheesecake
Oatmeal Cream Pie Ice Cream Sandwiches
Vegan Fluffernutter Cookies
Sweet Potato Meringue Pie
Espresso Caramel Thumbprint Cookies

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S’mores Cookies

These s’mores cookies are thumbprint treats with a honey cinnamon base, a silky chocolate filling, and a toasted marshmallow topping!

  • Author: Kate
  • Prep Time: 25
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 90
  • Yield: 48
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

For the cookie (Adapted from Love and Olive Oil):

  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ¾ cup light brown sugar, packed
  • ½ cup honey
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 3 teaspoons cinnamon, divided
  • ¼ cup sugar

For the filling:

  • 11/2 cups semisweet chocolate, chopped or chips
  • 11/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 11/2 tablespoons light corn syrup

For the meringue:

  • 2 egg whites, at room temperature
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

To prepare the cookie:

  1. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter and brown sugar until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the honey and stir to combine. Stir in the egg and vanilla extract. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the flour, baking soda, salt, and 1 teaspoon of cinnamon. The dough will be dry. Stir on low to combine and then use a small cookie scoop to scoop out 1” rounds of dough. Combine the sugar and remaining cinnamon in a small bowl. Roll each round of dough in the cinnamon sugar mixture. Use your thumb or the rounded bottom of a ¼ teaspoon to make little impressions into each cookie. Place the dough rounds on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for 1 hour.
  2. Once ready to bake, preheat the oven to 350 and place the cookie dough balls 2” apart on multiple parchment-lined pans. Bake one at a time in the oven until the cookie edges are set, about 9 minutes. When you remove the pan from the oven, immediately use the back of the measuring spoon to make the thumbprint more defined, if needed. Allow to cool while you prepare the filling.

To prepare the filling:

  1. In a small saucepan over low heat or a microwaveable bowl, combine the chocolate, butter, and corn syrup and gently melt, stirring regularly, until the chocolate has melted. Carefully put the mixture into a piping bag fitted with a round tip or a Ziploc bag with the end snipped off and carefully pipe a bit of the chocolate mixture into the thumbprint of each cookie. Place in the fridge to cool while you prepare the meringue.

To make the meringue:

  1. Put your metal stand mixer bowl or large, heat-safe mixing bowl over a small saucepan filled with 1” of water as a double boiler. Add the egg whites and sugar to the top bowl and turn the heat to medium. Stirring frequently, gently heat the egg whites until the sugar has barely dissolved. You can carefully rub the mixture between two fingers- once it’s no longer gritty, it’s ready! Remove the bowl from the heat and place on the stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment (or use a hand mixer with beaters!). Add the cream of tartar and mix on medium-high speed until the mixture cools, thickens, and fluffs to stiff peaks. (See the link in the text for how-to’s on making meringue. Add the vanilla and put the mixture into a piping bag fitted with a small open star tip. Pipe dollops of meringue on each cooled cookie and carefully use a torch or a broiler to toast the marshmallow! Enjoy!

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YOU NEED TO KNOW: How to Whip Egg Whites (and Make Meringue Cookies!)

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’ll be honest- meringue is my arch nemesis. On top of pies, in a buttercream, WHEREVER, meringue is really just kinda no bueno in my book. I have failed time and time again when it comes to whipping egg whites the right way, so much so that I’ve nearly given up. But today, in continuation of our “You Need To Know” tutorials, we’re going to talk the ins and outs of egg whites, how to deal with them, what to use them for,  and how to know if you’re doing it all right. Prepare yourself for total domination of the egg whites.

What Is An Egg White?

Let’s put on our nerdy glasses and science caps for a second. An egg white (aka the albumen) is one of five portions of a whole egg and accounts for about 3/5 of an egg’s total weight. It’s primarily made up of protein and water and is viscous in consistency. When beaten, the protein structure of the egg white breaks down, and over time, those unfolded proteins will rearrange into a new, expanded form. Whipped egg whites can increase in size up to 8 times larger than its original volume, and this foaming ability makes it an all-star aerator in baked goods.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

How Do You Whip Egg Whites?

Egg whites are most easily whipped with an electric hand or stand mixer, but this process can be done by hand with a wire whisk as well. To whip egg whites, start with a clean, grease-free bowl and whisk attachment and begin to process the egg whites on low speed. Large, foamy bubbles will begin to appear, and once the egg whites transform from viscous liquid to loose foam, you can increase the speed of your mixer. Although the bubbles start out large, smaller, more fine bubbles will begin to appear and the foam will continue to increase in volume. You’ll stop your mixer when you reach the desired level of foam formation. So what if a recipe calls for “firmly whipped egg whites” or “egg whites with soft peaks?” We need to know what we’re looking for! Let’s start by breaking down the stages of egg white foam formation.

Foamy Egg Whites

To prepare foamy egg whites, whip your fresh, room temperature egg whites in a clean bowl until large bubbles begin to appear. At this phase, the egg whites will appear like bubbles in a foamy bathtub and will not hold their shape.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Soft Peaks

Soft peak egg whites will have a slight sheen to them and fine textured bubbles. At this phase, the whipped foam will still slide around in the bowl, and if you lift a beater out of the mixture, the peak will droop over without holding its shape. The foam is definitely fluffing up at this phase though, and you will likely see a trace of your beater in the mixture.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Firm Peaks

This is the narrow gap between soft and stiff peaks. Here, a beater lifted out of the bowl will yield a defined tip that may fall over slightly but will keep its overall pointy shape.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Stiff Peaks

At this phase, peaks are stiff, shiny, and stick to the inside of the bowl. If you lift a beater out of the bowl, the peak tip will stick up tall with a slight sheen. If you were to turn your bowl upside down at this phase, the foam would stick to the inside of the bowl without falling out! Avoid beating your egg whites past this stage as you’re likely to create an unstable, overbeaten egg white that will eventually break and deflate.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

How Can I Ensure Successfully Whipped Egg Whites?

Starting out with room temperature eggs in a clean, grease-free bowl will begin the process on the right foot. Room temp eggs whip more readily than cold ones and any trace of fat (think butter, cooking spray, egg yolk) will inhibit foaming. For best results, separate your egg yolks from their whites while cold and allow the whites to come to room temperature on their own. You can ensure your bowl is truly grease-free by wiping off the inside of it with a paper towel saturated with lemon juice.

There’s  also a few things that you can add to your egg whites to increase stability. Some recipes may call for adding an acid like cream of tartar, vinegar, or lemon juice, and typically 1/8 teaspoon of any of these per egg white is enough to give aid. Sugar also stabilizes egg whites and can be added in little by little near the end of the whipping duration. Avoid adding sugar in too early or too quickly as this can inhibit foam formation. More sugar incorporated into the mixture will result in a mixture that is glossy and shiny.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood
Foamy, soft, and stiff whipped peaks.

Is There Anything Else I Need to Know About Whipping Egg Whites?

Even stabilized egg whites are delicate, so take care when incorporating them into baked goods. Most recipes will call for gently folding the foam into whatever batter you’re working with. If you opt to beat your egg whites by hand, consider using a copper bowl or whisk! The copper in the bowl or whisk reacts with one of the proteins in the egg white, causing foamy bubbles to expand. Finally, if you’re looking for a suitable substitute for whole egg whites, consider using liquid egg whites from a carton. Just check to make sure you’re not purchasing one with a bunch of add-ins to the ingredients list.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

What Do I Use It For?

Whipped eggs whites are used in a number of foods like cakes, meringues, and souffles. The foamy nature of whipped egg whites provides air, height, and a light texture to foods that benefit from the added fluff. You’ll find a small list of recipes at the bottom of this page that contain whipped egg whites, so if you’re in need of inspiration, start there! In the coming weeks, I’m going to be sharing a variety of whipped egg white-containing recipes, starting with today’s crispy Easter meringue cookies.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Easter Meringue Cookies

These Easter meringue cookies are made up of stiffly whipped egg whites to which vinegar has been added for stability and sugar has been added for sweetness. They bake up in the oven into crisp, weightless bites of sweetness that make for a cute and accidentally fat-free snack. The texture and taste of these cookies reminds me of the marshmallows you might find in a box of cereal or a packet of hot cocoa mix, and that is in no way disappointing to me.

For a little added flair, I’ve dipped these cookies in chocolate followed by either sprinkles or finely chopped pecans. Both add flavor and texture in a fun and festive way that is sure to add some springtime cheer to your home. If you’re interested in turning these basic meringue cookies into Easter meringues (aka resurrection cookies), check out the link here for a how-to on incorporating the Easter story into your baking. It’s a fun way to engage kiddos in the kitchen and to celebrate Easter beyond the bunny.

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I hope you all have found this tutorial useful and that you’ll give whipped egg whites a try! See below for a list of a few airy egg white-containing treats so that you can get some practice ASAP. Happy baking, friends!

If you want to know how to whip egg whites into baked goods, check out these recipes:

Milk Chocolate Chip Cake

Flourless Chocolate Cake

Mint Chocolate Souffle

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie

Baked Alaska

You Need to Know How to Whip Egg Whites and Make Meringue Cookies. This is a tutorial on whipping egg whites to firm, stiff, soft, or foamy peaks and how to make a meringue! Learn how to make easter resurrection cookies with pecans and how to troubleshoot what went wrong with your egg whites. Why did they defeat, not fluff up, not whip, etc. Learn how to use up egg whites in this tutorial post on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

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Easter Meringue Cookies

These easter meringue cookies are light and airy, crispy marshmallow cookies dipped in chocolate and either sprinkles or pecans. A fun and festive fat-free treat for springtime!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 360
  • Yield: 8 Dozen
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 3 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
  • ¼ teaspoon white vinegar or cream of tartar
  • Dash of salt
  • 2/3 cup (130 gm) sugar
  • Food Coloring, if desired
  • White Chocolate or almond bark for dipping, if desired
  • ½ cup sprinkles or finely chopped toasted pecans, if desired

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees and line two large sheet pans with parchment paper.
  2. In a large clean, grease-free bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, use the whisk attachement to whip the egg whites on low speed until foamy bubbles appear at the top. Add the vanilla bean paste and vinegar (or cream of tartar) and continue whipping until really foamy. Increase the speed to medium-high and slowly add the sugar 1 tablespoon at a time until it has all been incorporated. Continue whipping until stiff glossy peaks appear (see notes in blog post above for help on this), about 8 minutes. If you’d like to add in food coloring, add a small bit and gently whisk or fold in.
  3. Outfit a pastry bag or large Ziploc bag with a large piping tip (I used a Wilton 2A) and pipe small 1-1/4”-2” diameter cookies about 2” apart on the parchment paper. Do this swiftly so as not to allow  the foam to deflate. Place both sheet pans in the oven and bake for about 50 minutes to an hour. The cookies should feel firm to the touch. Turn off the oven and keep the door closed and allow them to cool to room temperature completely, even overnight. The cookies are done when the bottoms feel fry, pop off the paper easily, and almost sound hollow when tapped.
  4. If you wish to dip your meringues, gently microwave ¾ cup of white chocolate or almond bark for dipping and in 20 second increments, stirring regularly until melted and smooth. Do not overheat as the chocolate may seize. Quickly dip the bottoms of each meringue in chocolate and then dip in either sprinkles or the chopped pecans. Allow to cool on wax or parchment paper and eat within 1-2 days. Keep in a dry, moisture free place covered and air tight as meringues will get sticky over time, particularly in humid climates.

Notes

  • To follow the Easter story, check out the link in my blog post.

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

This post is sponsored by The Incredible Egg. All opinions expressed are my own. 

This time of year is so wonderfully cozy. Even in the South where winters threaten of 80 degree temperatures and absolutely no snow, I can’t resist bundling up in thick socks and fuzzy turtlenecks. Jewel tones and wool, cinnamon and pumpkin, crackling fires and crunchy leaves are non-negotiables for me; if that’s not an indication of how much I adore autumn then I don’t know anything.

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

As a baker, I look forward to the fall for the flavors and the time spent around the table. I know that whatever comes out of my kitchen will almost inevitably be shared with a few grateful hearts in my kitchen or the home of someone else. Those sentiments, the exploding heart feels of love and gratitude and joy are kind of contagious this time of year, and it’s so sweet that we should soak it in while we can. Let’s just linger on these fall feelings.

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie

This sweet potato meringue pie is basically fall in a nutshell. The pie crust, the cinnamon and nutmeg flavored filling, and the fluffy brown sugar meringue all remind me of a million dishes I’ve had in autumns of years past. The nostalgia and tradition that is loaded into this super Southern pie is so thick it’s almost tangible, and if you give it a try I think you’ll agree.

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m sharing this pie with you today in partnership with The Incredible Egg. This is a group I’m thrilled to work with because eggs are a HUGE part of my life in the kitchen and a versatile staple for holiday baking. Nearly all my favorite recipes, both traditional or new, incorporate those little protein-packed friends, and to work with The Incredible Egg is really like food blogger #goals, okay?

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Making the Pie

Let’s chat about the ins and outs of this sweet potato meringue pie. First we have the crust. My tried and true trusty pie crust is the buttery, flaky base of this recipe. I opted for a fairly traditional pie crimp here, and then I par-baked the shell. Finally, a thin layer of beaten egg wash gives it that golden, glossy photo finish. She’s pretty, right?

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

The filling is literally a cinch. Pureed sweet potatoes, evaporated milk, and eggs combine with butter and seasonal spices to create a smooth and autumnal filling. It’s really that good.

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

The icing on the cake (err, pie) for this sweet potato meringue pie is the brown sugar topping. The meringue here is thick and fluffy, almost marshmallow-like. The best part is its  cinnamon and brown sugar scent. I agree, meringue is a little intimidating to make, but this one is hard to beat. I almost always opt for a cooked meringue which ensures that the egg whites are brought to a safe temperature before consuming.

Sweet Potato Meringue Pie by Wood and Spoon blog. This is a butter and shortening pie crust blind baked and filled with a sweet potato, pumpkin tasting filling, cinnamon, and warm spices. The topping is a brown sugar and cinnamon marshmallow meringue that is cooked on the stove and whipped to stiff peaks. The whole thing is torched for a toasty golden finish. Read more about this fall autumn favorite pie for holidays (especially thanksgiving!) on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

This sweet potato meringue pie is perfect for your upcoming holiday celebrations. I hope you share thick slices with the people you love and take pride in serving something that is special and beautiful. Be sure to share your recipe recreations for a chance to win a holiday giveaway prize, including Le Creuset bakeware. To enter, post your recipe recreation on Instagram with the hashtag #IncredibleHolidayDesserts. I’ll be reviewing all entires and selecting a winner! See official rules for details.

Happy baking to you all!

If you like this sweet potato meringue pie you should try:

Caramel Apple Pie

Pumpkin Pecan Tart

Sweet Potato Cinnamon Rolls

Salted Maple Pie

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Sweet Potato Meringue Pie

This is a buttery pie crust filled with sweet potato filling and topped with a brown sugar cinnamon italian meringue. Perfect for holidays!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 9
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 13/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 5 tablespons chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into pieces
  • 6 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 5 tablespoons (approximately) ice water

For the filling:

  • 11/4 cups sweet potato puree (made from about 1 large sweet potato, see notes)
  • 11/4 cups evaporated milk
  • 3 large eggs
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ¾ teaspoon ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon cloves

For the meringue:

  • 3 large egg whites
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

To prepare the pie:

  1. Whiz the flour, sugar, and salt in a food processor to combine. Pulse in the shortening and butter, just until evenly dispersed in pea-sized clumps. Begin adding ice water 2 tablespoons at a time until moist clumps begin to form. Remove dough from food processor, form it into a flat round disk, and wrap in plastic wrap. Chill in the fridge for at least an hour prior to use.
  2. When you’re ready to bake the pie, roll the dough out on a well-floured surface into a 1/8-1/4” circle about an inch larger than your pie plate on all sides. Roll the dough loosely back onto the rolling pin and lift it into the pie dish. Gently fit the dough into the pie plate and trim off any excess dough leaving a 1” border around the edge of the dish. Fold the lip of the dough under so that it extends just over the edge of the pie plate and crimp the edges as you prefer. Prick a few holes in the bottom of the dough with a fork and place the whole pan into the freezer to chill briefly, about 15 minutes. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together the sweet potato puree and evaporated milk. Add the egg and sugar, stirring just until combined. Add the remaining ingredients and stir to combine. Set aside while you bake the pie crust.
  4. When the oven is preheated, remove the pie plate from the freezer and line the insides of it with a piece of parchment paper. Use either pie weights or dry beans/rice to weigh down the dough and bake for about 15 minutes. After this initial bake, remove the pie weights, brush the entire crust with a thin layer of egg wash, and bake for an additional 5 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven, pour in the filling, and bake for another 35-40 minutes or until the center of the pie is set and no longer really jiggly. About 10 minutes into the bake, gently cover the crust with a ring of foil to prevent the edges from burning.

To prepare the meringue:

  1. Combine the egg whites, sugar, cream of tartar, and salt in a large bowl set over a pot filled with about an inch of simmering water. I use my stand mixer bowl set over a small saucepan, just make sure the bowl is not touching the water. Stir the mixture with a spatula until the brown sugar has dissolved. Remove the bowl from the heat and place on the stand mixer, adding the vanilla and cinnamon. Beat on medium speed with the whisk attachment until it becomes fluffy, and the continue beating an additional few minutes until glossy stiff peaks form. The bowl of the stand mixer should also be cool to touch. Spread the mixture on the cooled pie and use a torch to toast the top of the meringue. Alternatively, you can bake the meringue at 375 for about 10-12 minutes until golden.

Notes

  • To make sweet potato puree, peel and dice one large sweet potato and boil in a medium-sized pot of water until the potatoes are tender to the fork, about 10-15 min depending on the size of your potato pieces. Puree in a blender or food processor with 2-3 tablespoons of water, or more as needed to get a thick but smooth puree. Allow to cool prior to using in pie mixture.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1

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Baked Alaska

Baked Alaska recipe from the Wood and Spoon. This is a simple dark cocoa chocolate cake layered into a bread pan with store bought ice cream. The layered rectangle cake is frozen and then coated with fluffy French meringue before being toasted. the recipe for this classic vintage dessert comes from Jessie Sheehan new book. Find the recipe and how to for this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

There are some things that are just better off together. Take for instance peanut butter and jelly or popcorn at the movies. Likewise, cheese tastes best with wine, Justin is stellar with Selena, and jeans are always perfect with a good-fitting white tee. I have a lot of opinions about things that go well together, particularly as it pertains to food, and today I’m sharing with you a dessert featuring my favorite match made in heaven: cake and ice cream. Today’s baked Alaska dessert is a winning combination stuffed with the Bonnie and Clyde of sweets, so let’s dive right in!

Baked Alaska recipe from the Wood and Spoon. This is a simple dark cocoa chocolate cake layered into a bread pan with store bought ice cream. The layered rectangle cake is frozen and then coated with fluffy French meringue before being toasted. the recipe for this classic vintage dessert comes from Jessie Sheehan new book. Find the recipe and how to for this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Baked Alaska?

Okay, I already know what some of you are thinking. “What is a baked Alaska?!” I hear you. Brett spent a solid month rolling his eyes at the name of this dessert, so if it’s new to you too, join the club. Baked Alaska is a classic frozen dessert with alternating layers of cake and ice cream coated in a toasted meringue. I’m not sure who came up with this little icy dream, but I’d love to give them a hug and a high five because it is delicious. I think you’ll like it too.

Baked Alaska recipe from the Wood and Spoon. This is a simple dark cocoa chocolate cake layered into a bread pan with store bought ice cream. The layered rectangle cake is frozen and then coated with fluffy French meringue before being toasted. the recipe for this classic vintage dessert comes from Jessie Sheehan new book. Find the recipe and how to for this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

The Vintage Baker

This recipe for baked Alaska comes from Jessie Sheehan’s new book, “The Vintage Baker.” Featuring loads of throwback mid-century recipes updated for modern tastes, Jessie’s book is filled with baked goods that will remind you of days of old and will leave you feeling seriously hungry. Although I was really interested in a ton of the recipes from her book, I opted to test out the baked Alaska first, and I am thrilled to share it with you today!

Baked Alaska recipe from the Wood and Spoon. This is a simple dark cocoa chocolate cake layered into a bread pan with store bought ice cream. The layered rectangle cake is frozen and then coated with fluffy French meringue before being toasted. the recipe for this classic vintage dessert comes from Jessie Sheehan new book. Find the recipe and how to for this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.comMaking Baked Alaska

To make the baked Alaska, we start with the cake. A dark cocoa cake bakes in a thin layer at the bottom of a 9″x13″ pan. After cooling, cut the cake into three equal-sized rectangles, sized to fit into a standard loaf pan. Line the pan in plastic wrap before alternating layers of the cake and store-bought ice cream inside of it. After filling the pan, cover the cake with plastic wrap and freeze to firm up solid.

Baked Alaska recipe from the Wood and Spoon. This is a simple dark cocoa chocolate cake layered into a bread pan with store bought ice cream. The layered rectangle cake is frozen and then coated with fluffy French meringue before being toasted. the recipe for this classic vintage dessert comes from Jessie Sheehan new book. Find the recipe and how to for this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

After freezing, we whip up a simple meringue made from egg whites and sugar. The frozen cake is inverted onto a prepared plate and the whole thing gets coated in a layer of meringue. To finish off the dessert, we toast the meringue with a kitchen torch (or briefly in the oven) until the whole thing is golden brown. Baked Alaska, although seemingly complex and difficult to make, is actually an achievable semi-homemade treat!

Baked Alaska recipe from the Wood and Spoon. This is a simple dark cocoa chocolate cake layered into a bread pan with store bought ice cream. The layered rectangle cake is frozen and then coated with fluffy French meringue before being toasted. the recipe for this classic vintage dessert comes from Jessie Sheehan new book. Find the recipe and how to for this summer dessert on thewoodandspoon.com

Congratulations to Jessie on the release of her new book! Give this baked Alaska a try and let me know what you think! This is the perfect treat to wow with at your upcoming summer shindigs. Happy baking and stay tuned for another recipe coming later this week!

If you like this baked Alaska you should try:

Mint Brownie Ice Cream Cake

Strawberry Icebox Pie

Hot Fudge Sundae Cake

Black Forest Ice Cream Cake

Vegan Coconut Lime Ice Cream Pie

Confetti Ice Cream Cake

Print

Baked Alaska

This recipe for baked Alaska features layers of homemade dark cocoa chocolate cake and store-bought ice cream. The whole thing is coated in toasted French meringue, making this is a show-stopping summertime dessert.

  • Author: Jessie Sheehan
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 420

Ingredients

For the cake:

  • ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons (125 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 6 tablespoons (30 gm) dutch-process cocoa powder
  • ½ cup (100 gm) packed dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • Rounded ¾ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 11/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup (60 mL) vegetable oil
  • ½ cup (120 mL) buttermilk, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (120 mL) boiling water
  • 11/2 teaspoon espresso powder
  • 3 pints (1.4 liters) ice cream such as strawberry, chocolate, and vanilla

Meringue:

  • 6 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1 cup (200 gm) granulated sugar)

Instructions

To prepare the cake:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 13-by-9-by-2- inch pan with nonstick cooking spray or softened butter, line with parchment paper, and grease again Line a 9-by-5-by-3 inch loaf pan with a piece of plastic wrap that hangs slightly over all four sides.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitter with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, cocoa powder, brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking soda, and baking powder, and salt on low speed until well incorporated.
  3. In a bowl, whisk together the yolks, vanilla, oil, and buttermilk until combined. With the stand mixer on medium-low speed, slowly pour the wet mixture into the dry ingredients and beat until incorporated. Scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed.
  4. In the same bowl, combine the boiling water and espresso powder, add it to the batter in the mixer bowl and mix for 30 seconds on low speed until smooth.
  5. Pour the batter into the larger, parchment paper-lined pan and bake for 14-16 minutes, rotating at the halfway point. The cake is ready when a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out with a moist crumb or two. Let cool completely and freeze for 30 minutes or up to 3 days, tightly wrapped.
  6. Place the strawberry ice cream in the microwave on high power for 20 seconds, or soften it on the counter until it scoops easily but isn’t melted. Place the ice cream on the bottom of the prepared loaf pan. Drape a piece of plastic wrap over the ice cream and use your hands to press it down into a flat, even layer.
  7. Cut the cake into three 4-inc wide pieces. Place 1 piece of the cake over the strawberry ice cream and press down. Return the other two pieces to the freezer.
  8. Soften the chocolate ice cream as you did the strawberry. Using plastic wrap and your hands, spread it into an even flat layer over the cake. Place another piece of the cake over the chocolate ice cream and press down. Repeat with the vanilla ice cream and the last piece of cake The last piece will be above the edge of the pan.
  9. Freeze until hard, at least 4 hours, preferable overnight, tightly wrapped in plastic wrap.

For the meringue:

  1. Whisk the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer on medium-high speed until foamy. Slowly add the granulated sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, and whisk on high speed until stiff, glossy peaks form, at least five minutes.
  2. Remove the loaf pan from the freezer and lift out the cake using the plastic wrap sling. Dip the bottom of the pan briefly in hot water if it has trouble releasing. Invert the cake onto a heatproof serving platter (the bottom layer is now the top) and generously cover the cake in meringue using an offset spatula or butter knife. Using a kitchen torch, if you have one, gently brown the meringue, or place the cake under the broiler for 1 or 2 minutes, watching closely to make sure it does not burn.
  3. Slice the cake with a long serrated knife and serve immediately. It is best the day it is made, but will keep in the freezer, lightly wrap in plastic wrap, for up to 3 days.

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