molasses

Molasses Angel Biscuits

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

Rise and shine and get to baking y’all! Today’s recipe is a stellar weekend baking project: molasses angel biscuits. Made with a bit of yeast and naturally sweetened with the rich flavor of molasses, this Southern-style bread has the dense fluff of a Parker house roll with the flavor of a biscuit. If you’ve never attempted them before, today is your day! Consider this a sign to get baking.

My (Somewhat Brief) Love Affair with Angel Biscuits

Once upon a time, Brett and I got married in a small-ish wedding ceremony at my grandparents’ farm. Although the event was a humble, home-spun affair, we managed to do a few things insanely well. One of those was the food. Our caterer was a childhood friend of Brett’s, and his offerings absolutely ruled both the wedding day and rehearsal dinner. On the eve of our wedding day, we joined a small group of family and friends in my grandparents’ antique car garage for a family style dinner. The dinner began with charcuterie boards (still a newish thing at the time), before we enjoyed short ribs over grits and perfect little angel biscuits. At the time, I didn’t have a clue what angel biscuits were, but, boy- I was about to find out.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

After the honeymoon, I began researching angel biscuits at home. Mac, our caterer, attempted to share his recipe with me, but I could never get them quite right. The goal was a yeast-leavened biscuit, soft and fluffy, flavored with rich molasses and slathered with melted butter. After what felt like a million attempts, I threw in the towel and stuck to the regular biscuits I knew and love. Perhaps angel biscuit baking just wasn’t for me.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

Molasses Angel Biscuits

Fast forward 10 years and hundreds of oven bakes later: I began the hunt again. Just a few weeks ago, I stumbled upon an angel biscuit recipe and decided to give it another go. They were good, but still lacked the molasses flavor I wanted. I tweaked the original recipe, substituting molasses for sugar, decreasing the milk, and adding a bit more baking soda to account for the acidity of the molasses. Finally, a winner- a really, really, good molasses angel biscuit.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

What are Angel Biscuits?

Angel biscuits are often described as a cross between a Parker house roll and biscuit. Whereas normal biscuits rise with the help of baking soda, baking powder, or both, angel biscuits also get the help of yeast. As a result, they require a little extra time to prepare, but the yield is worth it. Fluffy biscuits, less dense and dry from normal ones, with pillowy insides and crispy tops and bottoms. They are, in a word, angelic. Go figure.

How to Make Molasses Angel Biscuits

To make these molasses angel biscuits, we start by dissolving active dry yeast in a bit of warm water. While those two mingle, we stir together the dry ingredients: flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Next, cut in cold butter until incorporated in pea-sized clumps. Stir the milk and molasses with the yeast paste, and add the whole lot of it to the dry ingredients. This dough is pretty wet and requires well-floured hands and work surfaces. Work quickly, avoiding over-kneading the dough, and bring it all together before cutting out rounds of dough.

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

The biscuits require an hour-long rise before they are baked. I like to enjoy these molasses angel biscuits fresh from the oven with an extra schmear of butter. Bonus points to you if you decide to make a little molasses butter too! Just add a couple tablespoons of molasses to a stick of room temperature salted butter and cream together. Truly, it’s delicious.

Give these biscuits a try and let me know what you think! Happy Friday, y’all and happy baking!

Molasses Angel Biscuits By Kate of Wood and Spoon blog. These are fluffy yeast biscuits, naturally sweetened with rich molasses. These biscuits are a cross between a Parker house roll and a biscuit. Learn how to make these delicious butter biscuits on thewoodandspoon.com!

If you like the biscuits you should try:

Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes
Maple Oatmeal Biscuits
Honey Spelt Biscuits
Cream Cheese Chocolate Chip Biscuits
Gingerbread Cinnamon Rolls

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Molasses Angel Biscuits

These molasses angel biscuits rise with the help of active dry yeast and are naturally sweetened with the rich flavor of molasses!

  • Author: Kate Wood (Adapted from Irvin Lin)
  • Prep Time: 75
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 15
  • Category: Bread

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons warm water

  • 1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, cold and chopped

  • 3/4 cups milk (2% or whole)

  • 3 tablespoons molasses

  • Extra flour for rolling

Instructions

  1. Lightly grease a baking dish or pan with baking spray and set aside.

  2. In a small bowl, measure out the warm (but not HOT) water and sprinkle the yeast over top. Gently stir to combine it into a loose paste. Set aside.

  3. In a large bowl, whisk to combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Use a pastry cutter, the backs of two forks, or your fingers to quickly cut the butter into the dry ingredients, working it in until the butter is evenly distributed and broken down into small pea-sized bits. In a large measuring cup, whisk to combine the milk, molasses, and yeast paste. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients bowl and stir 7-8 times, just until combined into a wet, shaggy dough.

  4. Sprinkle a clean work surface with a bit of all-purpose flour. Dump the dough out onto the floured surface and work the dough into a rectangle. Press the dough gently until an inch thick and fold over top of itself. Repeat this process and press the dough out to 1” thickness again. Use a flour 1-3/4” biscuit cutter to trim out rounds of down and space them 1/4” apart on the greased pan. Collect any remaining dough, bring it together into a pressed-out rectangle, and cut more rounds. Repeat this process until all of the dough has been cut out. Cover the pan of biscuits with plastic wrap or a tea towel, and place in a warm spot in your kitchen to rise for 45 minute- 1 hour. The biscuits are ready when, once gently poked with a finger, the biscuit remains slightly indented without popping back out. Do not let it over-rise.

  5. In the last 20 minutes of your rise time, preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. When the biscuits have properly risen, place them in the preheated oven to bake about 12 minutes or until sturdy to the touch and barely beginning to brown. Remove from the oven and brush with melted butter, if desired.

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Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles

Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a soft spiced cookie sweetened with brown sugar and molasses and tossed in a cinnamon sugar. These holiday cookies are perfect for Christmas and make a great alternative to gingerbread. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

Confession Time: Deep down, I truly believe that cookies are the only acceptable dessert at Christmas. Don’t even tell me I’m wrong. I know some of you will try to convince me of your brownie pie, red velvet cheesecake, or some aggressively flavored peppermint cake, but I’m not here for it. If it’s December and there’s a Christmas tree in my house, cookies are the best option. With that being said, I do think it’s easy to get stuck in the cookie rut. I, myself, reach for the same soft and chewy sugar cookie recipe every year, because that’s what I’ve grown up on. Even so, I’m making efforts this year to branch out, if only slightly, to widen my cookie offerings during Christmas. Cue these chewy ginger molasses snickerdoodles.

Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a soft spiced cookie sweetened with brown sugar and molasses and tossed in a cinnamon sugar. These holiday cookies are perfect for Christmas and make a great alternative to gingerbread. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles

So, here’s another confession: I don’t actually like molasses cookies. Sure, I love making gingerbread houses, smelling cinnamon-spiced things, and the idea of ginger-y treats during the holidays, but honestly, molasses need to get in line. When there are peppermint brownie cookies, fancy-frosted sugar cookies, and bourbon snickerdoodles to taste, who wants to settle for molasses?! Even so, I know many people adore the intensity of a spice cookie, so I decided to make a toned-down version that maybe even this Grinch would enjoy. Well, guess what- we landed somewhere delicious. These chewy ginger molasses snickerdoodles are, in fact, splendid.

Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a soft spiced cookie sweetened with brown sugar and molasses and tossed in a cinnamon sugar. These holiday cookies are perfect for Christmas and make a great alternative to gingerbread. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

These are chewy crackled cookies sweetened with brown sugar and a hint of molasses. The spice here is moderate too- just a smidge of cinnamon, ginger, and cloves. My favorite part, though, is the roll of cinnamon sugar that the dough gets just before baking. It leaves us with a sanded exterior and a little extra texture. These cookies are mildly spiced, but wonderfully Christmas. If you have yet to be a fan of ginger cookies, this is the dough to try.

Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a soft spiced cookie sweetened with brown sugar and molasses and tossed in a cinnamon sugar. These holiday cookies are perfect for Christmas and make a great alternative to gingerbread. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.

I have a few other cookies in mind for this last two weeks before Christmas, so stay tuned! Happy Monday to you all and happy baking!

If you like these chewy ginger molasses snickerdoodles you should try:

Gingerbread Lemon Bars
Gingerbread Cinnamon Rolls
Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes
Pumpkin Snickerdoodles
Bourbon Brown Sugar Snickerdoodles

Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles by Wood and Spoon Blog. This is a soft spiced cookie sweetened with brown sugar and molasses and tossed in a cinnamon sugar. These holiday cookies are perfect for Christmas and make a great alternative to gingerbread. Learn more about the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com.
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Chewy Ginger Molasses Snickerdoodles

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Yield: 32

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups (313 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon (6 grams) cinnamon, divided
  • 1 ½ teaspoons (3 grams) ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon table salt
  • 1 teaspoon (5 grams) baking soda
  • 1 ½ teaspoons (3 grams) cream of tartar
  • ¾ cup (170 grams) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1 cup (220 grams) packed light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup (85 grams) unsulphured molasses
  • 1 large (50 grams) egg
  • 1 ½ teaspoons (6 grams) pure vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup (67 grams) granulated sugar

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, 1-1/2 teaspoons (3 grams) cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt, baking soda, and cream of tartar. Set aside.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, use the paddle attachment to cream together the butter and brown sugar on medium speed until smooth and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the molasses and stir on medium speed to combine. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the egg and vanilla extract, stirring on medium just until smooth. Add the bowl of mixed dry ingredients and stir on low speed to incorporate, scraping the sides of the bowl as needed. Once a soft dough comes together, set it aside.
  3. Line a heavy-bottomed baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper. In a small bowl, combine the remaining 1-1/2 teaspoons (3 grams) cinnamon with the granulated sugar. Use a medium (1 ½- tablespoon) spring-loaded scoop to portion out rounds of dough on the prepared baking sheet. Briefly roll the balls of dough in your hands to smooth and coat the sides of each cookie dough piece with the cinnamon sugar mixture. Once the cookies are coated and placed on the baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap refrigerate to firm up, about 1 hour.
  4. About 15 minutes prior to baking, preheat the oven to 350 °F (180 °C). Prepare a second baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and space the cookie dough pieces 2 inches apart. Bake the pans one at a time in the preheated oven for about 11 minutes or until the tops of the cookies are cracked and beginning to set. Allow to cool slightly prior to enjoying. Cookies can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container and are best eaten within 3 days.

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Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes

Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Simple, one bowl recipe of flavorful and warmly scented cakes sweetened with molasses and spices including cinnamon and ginger. There is a simple white chocolate frosting glaze icing on top. you can modify these mini bundt cakes to be larger bundt cakes or even use a loaf pan, a round cake pan, or a square baking dish. Find the recipe and other fall / winter/ holiday recipes on thewoodandspoon.com

Guys, I gotta tell you, I’m feeling so merry that I could burst. All the gift wrapping and carols and tinsel and Charlie Brown Christmas has got me feeling more festive than Mrs. Claus herself. I’ve eaten more peppermint bark and cookies than I can admit without a small amount of shame, but honestly, who cares? IT’S CHRISTMAS! If you haven’t gotten in the holiday spirit yet, just hang in there, because everyone is bound to catch the fever at some point. And if you’ve hit a mental block or dead end in your Christmas shopping already, keep reading because I have got some terrific tips for you!

These past few weeks I’ve gotten a lot of questions from friends and followers about what type of tools an aspiring baker might need. There’s so much available in stores that sometimes it’s hard to pick out which items are necessary and reliable. So I have compiled a Christmas list for you, or for the aspiring home bakers in your life, of tools and kitchen supplies that you can count on to get the job done. These are items and brands that I have in my home and rely on every week, and while not all are essential, they’re all super fun and useful. You can check out the links for these items at the bottom of this post!Christmas List Gift Guide for Baker

And if you haven’t maxed out your tolerable intake level of gingerbread and other holiday spiced foods, I have these little ginger molasses bundt cakes for you too! I had been looking for a ginger cake recipe for some time and finally found one from David Lebovitz that I was quite fond of.  I wanted these cakes to have a more mild ginger flavor and not be so heavily spiced that people who weren’t as fond of ginger could enjoy them as well. I think these are spot on.

Ginger Molasses Bundt CakesGinger Molasses Bundt Cakes

These ginger molasses bundt cakes are fluffy and moist, with warm flavors of molasses and brown sugar throughout. I used jarred ginger to help keep the prep time for this recipe under 10 minutes, but fresh ginger would be a home run here too. If you prefer a more strongly ginger flavored cake, you can add up to two more tablespoons of ginger to give them an extra zesty boost. The cakes are topped with a white chocolate glaze that sweetens them up a bit and make them look like little snow topped mountains. (Insert heart eyes).Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes

Because most people don’t have a mini bundt pan laying around, you can also make mini muffins or an 8″ cake out of this recipe. I personally prefer the mini muffins to a large cake, but who I am to tell you what to do? 

Stay tuned for more Christmas cheer from this gal over the next few weeks, and please give these ginger molasses cakes a shot! If you have any questions about the Christmas wish list, drop me a line below in the comments section and I will do my best to answer them. Cheers to all and to all a good night!

Ginger Molasses Bundt Cakes

 

Christmas List Gift Guide for Baker

  1. Cake Pans
  2. Double Oven Mitt
  3. Parchment Paper and Rounds
  4. Cookie Scoops
  5. Stand Mixer
  6. Measuring Cups and Spoons
  7. Cake Turntable
  8. Dorie’s Cookies and Baking Bible
  9. Wooden Spoons
  10. Apron
  11. Cake Stand
  12. Offset Spatula
  13. Sheet Pan

 

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Ginger Molasses Bundt cakes

These ginger molasses bundt cakes and moist and fluffy cakes, fragrant from spicy ginger and cinnamon, and sweetened up by a white chocolate glaze.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6

Ingredients

For the cakes

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 tablespoons fresh minced ginger (See Notes)
  • 1/2 cup mild molasses
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 egg, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 11/4 cup flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves

For the glaze

  • 3/4 cup white chocolate chips
  • 4 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 3/4 cup confectioner’s sugar, sifted

Instructions

To prepare the cakes

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Combine the vanilla, ginger, molasses, sugars, and oil in a large bowl, stirring together until evenly mixed.
  3. Bring the water to a boil in a saucepan. Once boiling, carefully add the baking soda and stir to mix in.
  4. Add the baking soda and water mixture to the bowl with the sugars and stir to combine. Add in the dry ingredients and stir just until combined.
  5. Grease (I use baking spray with flour) a 6 cake mini bundt pan and evenly disperse the batter in each cake pan. Place in the preheated oven and bake until a toothpick inserted comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for about 20 minutes and then invert the cakes on to a cooling rack to continue cooling.

To prepare the frosting

  1. Once the cakes are cooled, prepare the frosting.
  2. Over a double boiler set on low heat, melt the chocolate chips with the heavy cream. Do no let the water get too hot as this will cause the chocolate to seize up. Instead, allow the chocolate to begin melting and move on and off the heat as needed in order for the chips to just barely melt. Do not increase the heat above low or allow the bowl to get too hot. Once melted, allow the chocolate to cool slightly and then whisk in the sifted confectioner’s sugar. Stir until combined and the drizzle over the cooled cakes. If the frosting is too stiff, you can heat slightly in the microwave about 15 seconds or add additional heavy cream, 1 teaspoon at a time.

Notes

  • Notes: I used minced ginger from a jar, but if you have fresh ginger on hand that would be lovely as well.
  • This recipe can also be prepared in mini muffin tins. Adjust bake time to about 15 minutes. Recipe makes about 30 mini muffins or 1- 8″ cake.

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Recipe Adapted From: David Lebovitz