oatmeal

Healthyish Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies (aka Lactation Cookies that Don’t Suck)

Lactation Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are healthy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies that help stimulate milk production in nursing moms. Cookieshave flaxseed, chia seeds, oatmeal, and brewer's yeast that helps to increase milk supply. Read about the recipe and learn how to make these delicious cookies that don't taste weird on thewoodandspoon.com

There’s a lot they don’t tell you when you get pregnant. We hear a lot about the lack of sleep, the stretch marks, and the infinite loss of personal space. We’re prepared for birthing classes and diaper changing, we hear whispers of the terrible twos, and some of us can even sing “Rockabye Baby” in three-part harmonies by the time the kid arrives. But there’s other things, things people don’t tell you about, and that’s the kind of stuff that keeps me up at night.

People don’t mention legs cramps and night sweats and that weird upper lip discoloration that looks like a mustache. They don’t tell you that everything, even your little pinkies and nose, will swell, or that postpartum hair loss might leave you looking a little like Danny DeVito. There is a very real dying to self in motherhood, and there’s very little that can prepare you for the inner draining and temporary identity confusion that can ensue post-baby. Some of the most terrifying unmentionables are the ones surrounding nursing. Just brace yourself for the mystery there.

Lactation Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are healthy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies that help stimulate milk production in nursing moms. Cookieshave flaxseed, chia seeds, oatmeal, and brewer's yeast that helps to increase milk supply. Read about the recipe and learn how to make these delicious cookies that don't taste weird on thewoodandspoon.com

If you’ve ever nursed a child, you’ve heard of lactation cookies. There’s something about subjecting yourself to be a human chew toy that will send you deep into a black hole of the internet to read anything that will make that process easier. For some, milk production is an easy feat that flows in abundance, but for others it’s a daily struggle that can be incredibly stressful (as if we needed more of that, right?) I made these oatmeal chocolate chip cookies (aka, lactation cookies that don’t suck) for the baby mamas who need their sweets to be dual-purpose: delicious and healthyish. These lactation cookies are loaded with the stuff that encourages milk production in nursing Mamas but has enough of the goodness (read: butter, sugar, and chocolate chips) to make them not taste like garbage. If you’ve ever made lactation cookies before, forget that recipe and keep this one forever. These lactation cookies are the actual bomb.com and will be the only one you’ll want for yourself and your gal pals with kiddos.

Lactation Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are healthy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies that help stimulate milk production in nursing moms. Cookieshave flaxseed, chia seeds, oatmeal, and brewer's yeast that helps to increase milk supply. Read about the recipe and learn how to make these delicious cookies that don't taste weird on thewoodandspoon.com

So what’s so healthyish about these cookies? The star ingredients here are chia seeds, flaxseed meal, brewer’s yeast, and oats. All of these have milk producing properties that will help spur on that Vitamin D. More good news: MEN CAN EAT THESE TOO. Would you believe these are actually some of Brett’s *Favorite* cookies? No, your guy won’t start leaking if he eats these, but you have my full support in telling him that they will. After all, the nursing mom shouldn’t have to share these with anyone. (Sidebar: I know most of the guys have already stopped reading by now. I’m sorry that you’ve somehow made it this far, but to be fair there’s only, like, 2 of you anyways.)

Now I know someone is going to write me and tell me these aren’t healthy because of the processed sugar or all-purpose flour or yada yada yada. I hear you, but that is not how we’re rolling, okay? I tested a million versions of this cookie, and this is the one my heart desires. Feel free to bypass this for some other cookie that may or may not (read: will not) taste as good.

Lactation Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are healthy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies that help stimulate milk production in nursing moms. Cookieshave flaxseed, chia seeds, oatmeal, and brewer's yeast that helps to increase milk supply. Read about the recipe and learn how to make these delicious cookies that don't taste weird on thewoodandspoon.com

Next week we will get back to posting everyday recipes that won’t feel totally weird for everyone. Just be glad I didn’t get into any uncomfortable boob talk, okay? Make these lactation cookies for yourself or any of your nursing friends and let me know what you think! Happy baking and happy lactating!

If you like these lactation cookies you should try:

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies
Almost-Paleo Coconut Almond Chocolate Cookies
Flaxseed Bread
Morning Glory Muffins
Whole Wheat Blueberry Muffins

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Lactation Cookies

Lactation Cookies by Wood and Spoon blog. These are healthy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies that help stimulate milk production in nursing moms. Cookieshave flaxseed, chia seeds, oatmeal, and brewer's yeast that helps to increase milk supply. Read about the recipe and learn how to make these delicious cookies that don't taste weird on thewoodandspoon.com

These lactation cookies are healthy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies containing ingredients that help stimulate milk production!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 48 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup brewer’s yeast
  • 2 tablespoons flaxseed meal
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 2 cups semisweet chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream the butter, sugar, and brown sugar until smooth and fluffy, about 1 minutes. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat on low to combine. Scrape the sides of the bowl and add the flour, yeast, flaxseed meal, chia seeds, baking soda, and salt, stirring on low just until combined. Scrape the sides of the bowl again and add the oats and chocolate chips. Scoop 1-1/2 tablespoon sized balls of dough (I use a medium cookie scoop) onto the baking sheet about 2 inches apart. Bake for about 11 minutes or until the edges of the cookie are golden and the centers are set. Cool on the baking sheet for 2 minutes and then remove them to a cooling rack to cool completely. 

Notes

  • If you prefer an even healthier cookie, these can be prepared with 1/2 cup LESS granulated sugar and 1/2 cup LESS chocolate chips. The Brewer’s yeast has a strong flavor, so I prefer to cover it up a bit. 🙂

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

I can tell it’s a Monday by how entirely full I am. Do you ever do that? Do you ever try your hardest to eat well, exercise, and make generally healthy choices all week long only to crash and burn in a sugar and butter-induced dumpster fire of weekend disgustingness? Welcome to my world. I ate my way through the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, and now Monday is kicking my tail.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

We went to the beach with friends this weekend, and it was terrific. I can officially promise you that the only thing better than owning a beach house of your own is having best friends with a beach house. We trucked the kids to south Alabama’s Orange Beach and spent 72 hours power eating, sun soaking, and wrangling tiny humans. Now I know Alabama does not have a reputation for seriously delicious dining, but there are some really good meals to be had on the Gulf. Our schedule was basically built around the restaurants we planned to eat at and the rest of our tine was spent munching on snacks ever half hour. No crab claw, french fry, or margarita was left unscathed this weekend, because went in HARD.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

Which brings me to this case of the Mondays. 3 days of over-indulging has left this pregnant lady’s stomach even more stretched out than ever. I wake up hungry and go to sleep hungry, and that sad-looking sandwich I’m destined to eat for lunch would sound much better if it was deep-fried and covered with tartar sauce and tator tots. The beach restaurant weekend life spoiled me to pieces, and I’m totally dragging my feet on this road back to normalcy.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

If you ask me, the perfect remedy for that transitional window between vacation and work week eating is healthy-ish treats like these vegan oatmeal cookies. Instead of butter, we’ve got coconut oil, and in lieu of chocolate and caramel we have dried fruit and nuts. These vegan oatmeal cookies pack a few extra health benefits without sacrificing any bit of flavor, taste, and texture you’d hope for in a regular cookie. These are the type of treats you can enjoy without feeling entirely guilty (if you’re the type of person who feels guilt via baked goods).

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

This recipe for vegan oatmeal cookies was adapted from my favorite original vegan chocolate chip cookie, and I depended on Diamond of California Fruit and Nut Blend to make the prep that much more simple. I use Diamond Nuts for pretty much any and every nut-filled dish I create, but when I was thinking for some creative uses for their fruit and nut blends (I mean, besides just eating straight out of the bag) I immediately thought of cookies. The fun variety of fruits and nuts included in their three different blends adds a little something special to an otherwise ordinary batch of oatmeal cookies, and I was delighted by how at home they were in these chewy little bites of cinnamon-spiced deliciousness.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

To make vegan oatmeal cookies, we start by creaming the fat and sugar. Coconut oil is blended with organic brown and cane sugar as well as a little vanilla extract. A flaxseed egg is added in next to hold the cookie together and then the dry ingredients are tossed in as well. All-purpose flour, baking soda and powder, salt and a smidge of cinnamon anchor the oats, Marcona almonds, dried blueberries and cranberries, and the cookies bake up into fragrant and flavorful chews. I love how simply the dough comes together and how they keep well for days at room temperature.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

If this Monday has got you wishing for a little Friday/Saturday/Sunday special, bake up some vegan oatmeal cookies to soften the blow of yet another weeklong grind. I just know you’re going to love them! Many thanks to my BFFs at Diamond of California for being terrific partners and for sponsoring this post. These vegan oatmeal cookies would be the perfect home for any of their fruit and nut blends, so give them a try and let me know what you think! I hope this week treats you right and that you get some time to love yourself in the kitchen. Happy Monday and Happy Baking!

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these vegan oatmeal cookies you should try:

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

Vegan Fluffernutter Cookies

Almond Coconut Chocolate Cookies

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies

 

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Vegan Oatmeal Cookies

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies by Wood and Spoon. These are healthy vegetarian plant based cookies with coconut oil, flaxseed meal egg, dried fruit and nuts. Marcona almonds and dried cranberries and blueberries help to sweeten these brown sugar cookies and whole rolled oats keep them chewy. These stay soft for days and are flavored with cinnamon. Try this simple, one bowl healthy no butter less fat cookies for yourself and read more at thewoodandspoon.com

These vegan oatmeal cookies are a coconut oil based dough with oats, dried fruit and almonds! Simple one bowl recipe!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 10
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 24 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon flaxseed meal
  • 3 tablespoons water
  • ½ cup (120 gm) coconut oil
  • ¾ cup (150 gm) organic brown sugar
  • ¼ cup (50 gm) organic cane sugar
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (240 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups (200 gm) old fashioned oats
  • 1 cup of Diamond Marcona Fruit and Nut Blend OR ½ cup chopped almonds, ¼ cup dried blueberries and ¼ cup dried cranberries

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the flaxseed meal and water and allow it to rest for 5-10 minutes.
  3. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the coconut oil, brown sugar, sugar, and vanilla extract on medium speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Add in the flaxseed mixtures and stir to combined. Add the flour, cinnamon, baking soda, baking powder, and salt, stirring on low to combine. Add the oat and fruit and nut mixture and stir just until combined. The dough is very dry, but if you find that it is so crumbly that it won’t pack together, add a tablespoon of water at a time until you can pack it slightly.
  4. Spoon 1-1/2 tablespoon sized rounds of dough 2 inches apart on a sheet pan prepared with silicone baking mats or parchment paper. Bake in the preheated oven for 11-12 minutes or until the edges have turned golden and set. Remove from oven and allow to cool prior to enjoying.

Notes

  • If you don’t have a problem with using regular granulated or brown sugar, you can substitute that here, however, most standard sugars are not truly vegan. I used Wholesome Cane and Brown Sugar for these cookies.
  • Be sure that your coconut oil is not liquidy or melted. This recipe was tested using solid coconut oil, although there were some small differences between brands.
  • You can substitute GF flour here, although the cookies may spread slightly differently. Test the baking out on one or two to verify that they will bake as you’d like. If they spread too much, refrigerate the dough, and if they stay more puffed than you’d like, slightly press down on the dough balls.

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

Our weekends deserve new life, don’t you think? I say we find a reason to get excited about the mornings again- something to pair with that strong cup of coffee and cream. These maple oatmeal biscuits are weekend warriors, making a delicious statement every time they emerge from the oven. If you’re as into making weekends great again as I am, let’s just agree to start here.

I can remember the days when weekends were saving grace. Monday and Tuesday would thunder into Friday with an onslaught of assignments and tests and premature gray hairs. Grades and deadlines loomed around every corner, so the primary sanctuary from the stress of school were those bookend days of the week. There’s not a teenager alive who doesn’t wait for the weekends with the same anticipation as they do the recess bell. It’s just science.Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

But in adulthood, Saturday and Sunday don’t care. It doesn’t matter that you worked hard all week or that you’re desperate for a break. The weekend isn’t impressed by what you accomplished Monday through Friday because there are groceries to buy, lawns to mow, and cars to clean. Adulthood takes hostage those few hours of weekend solace and ransoms them for nine bags of raked leaves, an unloaded dishwasher, and few hours worth of ironing. It’s savage.

You notice I haven’t even mentioned children yet. In the BC years (that’s the “before children” years), weekends might have at least included thirty extra minutes for a second cup of coffee. There would be time for blown-dry hair and a pre-dinner cocktail, maybe even an hour for catching up on your DVR. Let’s pour one out in remembrance, shall we?

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comWeekends with kids are a different animal. There are bottles to warm and sippy cups to refill. Kids are not concerned about you reading the paper because kids want their Cheerios. Kids want to go to the park. Kids want to remove all of the plastic cups from the cupboard, litter them throughout the house, and then poop their pants while you’re in the middle of cleaning it all up. 

My kids like to spend the weekends begging for junk food and television. Saturday is their favorite day to to skip naps and pee in their shoes. On the weekends, you’ll find my kids stealing television remotes and car keys, hiding them in places Dad is sure to never find them (read: the toilet; see also: the trash can.) 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.comI have this dream where I wake up on a Saturday after seven o’clock. Alas, my family is all awake, and they have been patiently waiting for me to wake up. They teeter into my room with a warm coffee and breakfast tray in tow, complete with warm maple oatmeal biscuits and extra butter to boot. (Remember, I said this was a dream.)

These maple oatmeal biscuits might save your weekend. They won’t change a fifteenth diaper or freshen up a gone-cold mug of coffee, but they are good enough to add some luster to the weekend. A one-bowl dish that freezes like magic and reheats like a dream, these maple oatmeal biscuits are the rising star of the weekend, and you need them in your life. 

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

We start by tossing together a few dry ingredients- flour, sugar, the usual suspects. Oats are next, which account for the extra fluffy, slightly nutty flavor that we wind up with once the maple oatmeal biscuits have baked. Ice cold butter is incorporated throughout before the dairy and a heavy-handed pour of maple syrup brings the dough together. 

For the best success with these maple oatmeal biscuits, work quickly  to ensure that they enter the oven with chunks of chilled butter throughout. Handle the dough as little as possible so that they stay airy and fluffy, and use a floured cutter to trim out rounds, pressing straight down without any twist. I like to brush my biscuit tops with a little extra cream or butter for browning, but I think a simple painting of maple syrup would be perfectly sufficient here as well. You decide.

I think we should bake back the wonder into our weekends. Make these maple oatmeal biscuits as a means of celebrating the good Saturday and Sunday have to offer, and I promise you that things will start looking up. Happy week to you all!

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like these maple oatmeal biscuits, you should check out:

Buttermilk Biscuits

Honey Nut Biscuits

Chocolate Coffee Almond Scones

Funfetti Scones

Peach Crumb Muffins

 

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Maple Oatmeal Biscuits

Maple Oatmeal Biscuits Recipe by The Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, one bowl recipe for southern style fluffy layered biscuits filled with rolled oats and pure maple syrup. The biscuits are tall and thick, soft from the addition of buttermilk. Naturally sweet with maple syrup, these are best served for breakfast or as an easy addition to brunch. Find the recipe and the how to on thewoodandspoon.com

These maple oatmeal biscuits are soft, layered, Southern-style biscuits sweetened with maple syrup. Perfect for breakfast and brunch!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 25
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the biscuits:

  • 3 cups (390 gm) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup (50 gm) brown sugar, packed
  • 21/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 11/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 cup (90 gm) old fashioned oats
  • 11 tablespoons (155 gm) butter, cold and diced into tablespoon-sized chunks
  • 1 cup (240 mL) milk (whole or 2%)
  • 1/3 cup (80 mL) maple syrup

For topping:

  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoon maple syrup

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 415 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper.
  2. Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Stir in the oats. Use a pastry cutter or the back of a fork to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it is reduced to pea-sized clumps.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the milk and maple syrup. Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients and butter and fold just until combined.
  4. Turn the mixture out onto a floured surface. Gently pat together, but be careful not to overwork. Pat out to 1” thickness and then fold in thirds like a letter. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and then repeat this patting and folding process. Repeat once more for a total of 3 sets of folds. Pat the dough out to 1” thickness and use a floured biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Gently pat together the remnants and cut out more biscuits.
  5. Combine the melted butter and remaining maple syrup together and brush over the tops of the biscuits. Bake in the preheated oven for about 12-15 minutes, or until the tops are golden brown.

Notes

  • Be sure to use very cold butter and milk. Butter and milk that is not cold enough can prevent your biscuits from rising well.
  • Do not overwork your dough at any phase of the preparation.
  • The folding of the dough helps to create flaky layers within the biscuit, but is not necessary if you don’t care about this.
  • For flakiest layers, use a sharp biscuit cutters and push straight down into the dough. Refrain from twisting the cutter as you insert it into the dough as this can cause the edges to seal off and keep from rising well.
  • To reheat biscuits, toast in a toaster oven until fragrant.

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust & Butterscotch

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

I guess I’m supposed to tell you all about my trip to Charleston for the SAVEUR blog awards, right? You probably want to hear all about the other finalists, the food and wine, or what it was like to meet Deb in real life. Maybe you’re curious if Wood and Spoon blog brought home a win in the “Best Baking and Sweets” category (hint: we did!), or if I ever figured out how to pronounce the word “Saveur.” Though I should probably be carving out space to share about this past week and the wonderful new friends that were made, to be honest, I haven’t yet figured out how to sum it all up. So for now, let me dive into the beauty that is this brown sugar cheesecake and we can hash out the other details later. 

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

Before we begin, let me make one thing clear: I have dreams about this brown sugar cheesecake. A perfect combination of sweet and salty, this cake is a dessert that fulfills every taste and texture desire of my heart. For starters, I think about the tangy filling, folding over itself in silky clouds inside the bowl of my mixer. The scent of the oatmeal cookie crust, rich with butter, molasses, and cinnamon, wafts to the scene, momentarily stealing my every affection. But it’s the butterscotch sauce, thick and drippy, with caramel flavors and a not-so-subtle hint of salt, that oozes in and completes the most perfect bite. Each element of this cake enhances the flavors of its counterparts and it so tantalizes my tastebuds that I could almost break out into song. Without question, this brown sugar cheesecake is the one you won’t get over.

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.comLike the other cheesecakes on this site, we start by preparing the crust. Brown sugar, flour, oats, cinnamon, and salt are brought together with the addition of melted butter. Stir it all together and pat out the mixture into the bottom of a springform pan. While it bakes in the oven, we can prepare the filling for the cake. Cream cheese is beat on medium speed just until all of the clumps have been smoothed out. Brown sugar is added next, followed by eggs, heavy cream, and vanilla. The goal here is to incorporate each element evenly without overbeating the mixture as this can cause air bubbles and cracks in the cake once baked. Just beat in each addition until well combined, and be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl regularly.

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

Now everyone has their own special way to make a cheesecake, but there’s a few things that are almost universal to the process. First, you don’t want the cake to undergo drastic temperature changes during the baking process. To address this need, I prefer to put my cake pan in a waterbath, a pan full of boiling water that reaches about halfway up the sides of the cake. I also try to cool the cake down slowly so as not to cause cracks or shrinkage along the edges of the pan.

Second, it’s important to not over-bake your cheesecake. To test your cake for doneness, look for edges that appear to be slightly set and a center that is  wiggly under the surface of the cake. I turn the oven off once the inner half of the cake is only slightly jiggly upon shaking the pan. Unlike flour cakes, cheesecakes don’t adhere to the toothpick test, so don’t bother sticking your hand in there, okay?

Third, we want a crust that is baked, not soggy. If you opt to use the waterbath, be sure to wrap the outside of your pan in aluminum foil to ensure that no water seeps in to muck up your crust. I go a bit overboard and wrap my pan with three large layers of heavy duty foil, but I swear to you that extra effort is worth it.

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

The butterscotch is a can’t miss addition to this cake. Sure, the cheesecake is delicious on its own, but why pass up the opportunity to douse anything with a rich, decadent sauce like butterscotch? You could opt for store-bought, but let me encourage you, from the bottom of my heart, to consider making my favorite butterscotch sauce. Deb (yes, the one I met this past week) has the easiest, 5-ingredient sauce that you cannot screw up. I promise. If you prefer, Bobby Flay’s caramel sauce would do the trick here as well.

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

I’ve got a lot of joy and fun memories from this past week that I’m dying to share with you, but for now, I hope you’ll accept this brown sugar cheesecake. It’s sweet, salty, and entirely delicious- a dessert worth sharing with the best blog readers and friends the world has to offer. Thank you for continuing to support the Wood and Spoon blog. You guys rock. 

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

If you like this brown sugar cheesecake, you should check out:

Meyer Lemon Cheesecake

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tarts

S’Mores Cheesecake

Brown Sugar Pound Cake with Blueberries and Brown Butter Crumble

Brown Sugar Shortbread Cookies 

 

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Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust

Brown Sugar Cheesecake with Oatmeal Cookie Crust and Butterscotch Sauce by The Wood and Spoon by Kate Wood. This is a creamy, almost caramel cheesecake made with brown sugar. The crust is a sweet and salty press-in crust made from oats. The whole thing is baked in a springform pan and topped with caramel corn and butterscotch sauce by Smitten Kitchen. Find the recipe and some tips on making a pretty cheesecake without cracks or soggy crust on thewoodandspoon.com

The brown sugar cheesecake boasts a sweet and salty oatmeal crust and a gooey butterscotch sauce.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 45
  • Cook Time: 60
  • Total Time: 240
Scale

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 11/3 cup (110 gm) quick cooking oats
  • ½ cup (100 gm) packed brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup (45 gm) all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
  • 7 tablespoons (100 gm) unsalted butter, melted

For the cheesecake:

  • 11/2 pounds/ 3 blocks (680 gm) of cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • 3/4 cup (150 gm) brown sugar
  • 3 large eggs (170 gm), room temperature
  • 6 tablespoons (90 ml) heavy cream, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

To prepare the crust:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Prepare a 9″ springform pan by wrapping it in sheets of aluminum foil. I use 3 layers of extra wide, heavy duty foil wrapped to the top lip of the pan. Spray the inside walls and bottom of the pan with cooking spray.
  3. Stir together the dry ingredients until combined. Add the melted butter and stir just until combined. Gently pat out your mixture evenly into the bottom of the pan. Bake in the preheated oven for 10 minutes.

To prepare the cheesecake:

  1. Begin boiling some water in a kettle or saucepan for your water bath.
  2. Beat cream cheese in the bowl of a stand mixer at medium speed (I use 4 on my Kitchen Aid Mixer) for 2 minutes to remove all clumps. Do not overbeat, but scrape the sides of the bowl as needed. If many clumps remain, ensure that your cream cheese has softened to room temp.
  3. Add the sugar and beat on medium for an additional 1 minute. Add eggs, one at a time, and beat to combine an additional 1 minute. Scrape the sides of the bowl and then add the heavy cream, and vanilla. Beat to combine.
  4. Strain the cheesecake batter through a mesh strainer (if desired) into a reserved bowl. Pour the batter on top of the crust. Gently rap the pan on the counter to help any air bubbles escape.
  5. Place your springform pan into a slightly larger baking dish/pan and fill the larger pan with the boiling water you prepared for the water bath until the water reaches about halfway up the sides of the springform pan.
  6. Carefully place both pans in the preheated oven and bake for 1 hour. After an hour of baking, the edges and top of the cheesecake should be set but still slightly jiggle in the center. Turn the oven off and allow the cheesecake to bake for an additional 30 minutes in the oven. Prop the door of the oven open slightly with a wooden spoon and continue to cool the cheesecake for another 30 minutes in the cooling oven.
  7. Discard the water bath, remove the foil and then place the cheesecake in the fridge to chill for several hours or overnight. The cheesecake can be stored in the fridge for several days. Serve with butterscotch sauce (see notes) or homemade caramel.

Notes

  • I wrap my springform pan with three layers of heavy duty aluminum foil. This is to protect your crust from any water leakage of your springform pan. Many pans will claim to be waterproof but your crust will get soggy and inedible if water leakage happens. Don’t take any chances!
  • I use a 11″ round cake pan for my water bath but you can use any oven-safe dish that you have. Once of my readers used a roasting pan and that works just fine!
  • The cooling process seems lengthy and unnecessary, but it helps to prevent drastic temperature changes that can cause structural issues with your cake.
  • I love the butterscotch sauce from Smitten Kitchen and Bobby Flay’s salted caramel sauce. See the post above for the link to these recipes.

Cheesecake adapted from Miette

Trail Mix Cookies

Trail Mix Cookies recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Fun cookies to make with kids! These trail mix cookies have raisins, chocolate candies (m&M's), peanuts and oats! The cookies have crisp edges and chewy centers and are simple and easy to make. Requires short time and one bowl to make. Trail mix cookies are good summer camp recipe, school recipe, craft idea to bake with kids. Find the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

There’s a few things I need to get off my chest today. So if you were in need of another inappropriate post about my breasts- here it is. (!!!)

Let me start with a shout out to all the baby mamas out there that manage to nurse their children for extended periods of time. Ladies, how do you do it? Is there some sort of magic cream or ancient metal nipple shields that I need to know about? When the kid starts teething, do you play through the pain? Because over here, it is just NOT HAPPENING. 

 

George is 8 months old today (Why?! How?! When?! Didn’t this just happen yesterday?), and although he is still nursing, I can promise you that his days of voyaging on the Maidens of the Milk (my boobs, obviously) are numbered. Teeth, dwindling supply, and a vivacious 2 year old sister that is highly distracting every time George saddles up to the bar (again, my boobs) has got me counting down the days till we’re done.

I know that a lot of moms really love nursing, and I know that it’s a special bonding experience for mama and her baby. Yes, breast milk has all of the vitamins, and it’s so much less expensive, and the convenience of having a vending machine strapped inside your bra is just a ridiculous benefit to pass up. But George and I have bonded. He’s growing and healthy, I’ve got some milk stored in the freezer, and to be honest, I’d probably empty out all of the money in my purse right now if it meant never having to hear the mechanical “whee-woo, whee-woo, whee-woo” of my Medela breast pump ever again. There’s so many wonderful benefits to breastfeeding, but what I’m trying to say is, I think we’re almost done.

Trail Mix CookiesTrail Mix CookiesThe most selfish gain I’ve had from getting to nurse my babies is the snacks- those extra calories I get to indulge in each day. At our house, there’s never any shortage of snacks, and recently, we added trail mix cookies to the list of favorites. These trail mix cookies are pretty much always my next snack waiting to happen. Peanuts, chocolate candies, raisins, and oats, all stuffed into a delicious cookie dough that bakes up golden and delicious. A combination of my loaded oatmeal cookie dough and candied walnut chocolate chip cookies, these trail mix cookies are packed with all the trail mix fixin’s and are adaptable to include any other toppings you may have a hankering for. Cashews? Yup. Toffee? Sure. Reese’s Pieces? Do ya thang. 

Trail Mix CookiesTrail Mix Cookies

We tried some trail mix cookies while visiting Blackberry Farm a few weeks ago, and I spent my first few days home making test batches of the cookies to get them just right. The dough starts by creaming butter and sugar until it’s light and fluffy. After adding eggs, vanilla, and a sprinkling of dry ingredients, you dump in all the trail mix goodies you can find. Give the dough a quick chill (or a long one, if you want puffier, chewy cookies), and just try not to eat it all straight from the bowl. It’s that good. These trail mix cookies have crisp edges and chewy centers, but if you’re anything like me, you may opt to bake them until they’re golden brown, with little crunchy bits throughout.

Unless you’re an 8 month old on an all-milk diet, you need trail mix cookies in your repertoire. Sweet, salty, or whatever your craving is, these trail mix cookies are sure to satisfy the urge to snack. Give them a try and let me know what you think! There’s loads of other cookie recipes on the cookie recipe page of my site, so give that a check too. Oh, and enjoy this happy little video that I made for you all! Happy Wednesday and cheers to you!

Trail Mix Cookies

 

 

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Trail Mix Cookies

Trail Mix Cookies recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. Fun cookies to make with kids! These trail mix cookies have raisins, chocolate candies (m&M's), peanuts and oats! The cookies have crisp edges and chewy centers and are simple and easy to make. Requires short time and one bowl to make. Trail mix cookies are good summer camp recipe, school recipe, craft idea to bake with kids. Find the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

With chopped peanuts, raisins, chocolate candy, and oats, these trail mix cookies are sweet, salty, and simple cookies that are sure to please a crowd.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 30 1x
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 21/4 cups flour
  • 1 cup quick cooking oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoon corn starch
  • 1 cup candy coated chocolate (like M&Ms)
  • 3/4 cups unsalted peanuts, chopped
  • 3/4 cups raisins

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. In a large bowl or in the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter and sugars. Start on low until incorporated and then increase to medium, beating until smooth, creamy, and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat on low just until incorporated, scraping the sides of the bowl as needed. In a small bowl, combine the flour, oats, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and corn starch. Add the bowl of dry ingredients to the butter mixture and beat on low just until the mixture is combined. Scrape the sides of the bowl as needed and add the chocolate, peanuts, and raisins, stirring on low just until combined.
  3. Scoop 3 tablespoon sized balls of dough (I use a large cookie scoop) about 3 inches apart on to a cookie sheet prepared with a silicone baking sheet or parchment paper. These cookies are large and in charge and they need room on the baking sheet. If the dough is not cool to the touch and slightly firm, place the baking sheet with dough balls in the fridge for about 5-10 minutes to allow the dough to set up- this keeps the cookies from spreading too much. Once ready, place the pan in the oven and bake until the edges and top of the cookie are beginning to turn golden and have set up, about 9 minutes. The centers will still appear underdone. Cool on a cooling rack, or just dive right in and enjoy.

Notes

  • For crunchy, textured cookies, refrigerate for less time and bake a minute or two longer, or until the cookies is golden all over the top. For a chewy, softer cookie, refrigerate the dough for an hour and then bake for recommended length of time.

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a ice cream machine maker recipe inspired by Ben and Jerry's famous oatmeal cookie ice cream. oatmeal infuses the cream and milk mixture and a cinnamon swirl filling and chunks of chewy oatmeal cookies are added to this to make it the best oatmeal cookie filled ice cream ever. Find the simple and fun summer frozen dessert recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

Just so we’re clear, small talk is not my forte. I did not go through the effort of starting this blog so we could chat about the Yankees, the news, or the weather. But on days like today, it bears mentioning that it is hot. It is too. darn. hot. 

If you happen to be reading this blog from some idyllic land where the temp is currently a comfortably breezy 75 degrees and sunny, please, don’t tell me. Over here, in what is quite possibly America’s armpit, I have pools of sweat collecting behind my knees, in between my boobs, and in just about every other undesirably hot place on my body. Ignorance is bliss and I would rather pretend everyone resides in a town that scorches similar to the surface of the sun, ok?

This should be an example of my dedication to baking: even on Africa-hot days like today, my oven and stovetop still get a workout. Today, I’m testing out a bread pudding recipe, which, to be honest, sounds about as yummy as a bowl of ghost pepper chilies, or, I don’t know, a serving of liquid hot magma

What I really want on days like today (besides a margarita and a one way ticket to Antarctica) is ice cream. All the ice cream.

I think having to choose a favorite ice cream would be similar to having to pick a favorite child. There’s just so much to love in every flavor. Except for rum raisin. WHO ORDERS THAT?

One flavor that has always comes close to the top of my favorites list is Ben and Jerry’s Oatmeal Cookie Chunk. Do you guys remember that flavor? According to my research, it was a limited batch ice cream that B&J are no longer offering. It was creamy, sweet, and deliciously reminiscent of an oatmeal cookie (sans the raisins.)

Let’s have a moment of silence in remembrance. 

The good news? Today’s recipe is a show off. This oatmeal cookie chunk ice cream is really, really close to my memory of the original. Which means it’s really, really spectacular.

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream

Yes, it’s stuffed to the brim with oatmeal cookie pieces, and of course there’s a little cinnamon sugar swirled in there too, but what really makes this ice cream special is that the milk and cream are steeped in oatmeal. So even the ice cream base tastes like a cookie. WHAT?!?! Mind blown.

We start with a perfect ice cream base recipe, which, for me, is Jeni Britton Bauer’s recipe. (Sidenote: If you don’t have her book yet, just quit stalking it on Amazon and buy it already. The recipes work, are delicious, and are worth every second of stovetop time in this summer heat.) To Jeni’s vanilla ice cream base, we add in some oatmeal because we want every bite of this oatmeal cookie chunk ice cream to be reminiscent of  those flavors we all know and love. From there, we fold in some chewy oatmeal cookie chunks and a few drizzles of cinnamon sugar goodness. That’s all there is to it! 

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream

The only thing that would make this oatmeal cookie chunk ice cream experience more enjoyable on a day like today is if I could just go to the store and buy it from Mr. Ben and Mr. Jerry. I really don’t want to crank up my stovetop any more on a steamy afternoon  like today, but I will since the forefathers of oatmeal ice cream decided to call it quits on us. Is there a petition we can sign to bring it back??!!

I hope you’re somewhere on a beach with a cold drink in your hand, but if you’re like me, stuck at home with a bad case of boob sweat– make this oatmeal cookie chunk ice cream. You deserve it. 

(PS– Mom, I’m sorry for mentioning my boobs on the internet . Don’t be mad.)

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream

 

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Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream

Oatmeal Cookie Chunk Ice Cream Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a ice cream machine maker recipe inspired by Ben and Jerry's famous oatmeal cookie ice cream. oatmeal infuses the cream and milk mixture and a cinnamon swirl filling and chunks of chewy oatmeal cookies are added to this to make it the best oatmeal cookie filled ice cream ever. Find the simple and fun summer frozen dessert recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

This oatmeal cookie chunk ice cream is an oatmeal flavored ice cream base filled with chunks of chewy oatmeal cookie and cinnamon sugar swirls.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 45
  • Total Time: 45
Scale

Ingredients

For the oatmeal cookie pieces

  • 11/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 cups of quick cooking oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 sticks unsalted butter
  • 11/2 cups packed light brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 large eggs

For the cinnamon swirl filling

  • 1/3 cup corn syrup
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

For the ice cream

  • 3/4 cup old fashioned oats
  • 22/3 cups whole milk
  • 5 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 11/2 cup heavy cream
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup light corn syrup

Instructions

To prepare the oatmeal cookie pieces

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Stir together the flour, oats, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt until combined in a medium sized bowl.In a large bowl, cream the butter until smooth with an electric mixer. Add the sugar, beating until light and fluffy. Add the vanilla and eggs, beating well to combine thoroughly. Add the dry ingredients slowly and mix just until combined.
  3. Pat out the dough into the bottom of an 8″x8″ baking pan and bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes or until the dough at the center of the pan looks nearly done. Allow to cool at room temperature or in a fridge. Dice 1/2 of the pan into 1/2″ squares just before using. The remaining pieces can be stored at room temperature for 3 days or in the freezer for up to 2 months.

To prepare the cinnamon swirl filling

  1. Combine the corn syrup, cinnamon, and sugar by stirring. Set aside until ready to use.

To prepare the ice cream

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread the oats out on a small sheet pan and toast in the preheated oven for 10 minutes. The oats should become fragrant but not burned.
  2. Meanwhile, mix two tablespoons of the milk with the cornstarch in a small bowl. In a separate, medium-sized bowl, whisk the cream cheese and salt together until smooth.
  3. In a 4 quart saucepan, combine the remaining milk, cream, sugar, corn syrup, and oats. Bring to a boil over medium heat and boil for 4 minutes. Using a fine mesh strainer, strain the oats from the milk mixture and discard. Pour the milk mixture back into the saucepan and return to the heat. Gradually whisk in the cornstarch slurry and bring back to a boil, stirring constantly. Mixture will thicken slightly and should coat the back of a spoon after about 1 minute. Remove from heat.
  4. Whisk the milk mixture into the cream cheese mixture until smooth and without clumps. Pour the mixture into a gallon sized plastic bag and place it, sealed, in to the ice bath. Allow to chill until cold, adding ice as needed.
  5. Once cold, pour the mixture into a prepared ice cream maker canister and prepare ice cream according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  6. Once ice cream is finished, smooth, and creamy, layer large spoonfuls into a dish (I use a loaf pan), drizzling with the cinnamon swirl filling and topping with cookie pieces as you layer in the ice cream. Once all of the ice cream has been layered in the dish with the cookies and swirl filling, drag a knife through the ice cream 5-6 times to swirl the components together. Cover and allow to freeze in the freezer for at least 6 hours prior to eating.

Recipes Adapted From: Jeni Britton Bauer
 

Honey Oat Bread

Honey Oat Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, delicious, and healthy homemade sandwich bread that is sweetened with honey and has old fashioned or quick oats in there. It's a soft, white, chewy bread that makes two loaves. Find the recipe for this simple yeast bread on thewoodandspoon.com

This time last week, I was very pregnant. 37 weeks, large and in charge, swollen feet, hot flashy… pregnant.

This time last week, I had plans to get a mani/pedi, finish the baby’s nursery, and type up a few blog posts before my maternity leave.

This time last week, unbeknownst to me, I was very much so in labor.

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

I am overjoyed to announce that last Wednesday, May 11th, at 1:52 pm, Brett and I welcomed a baby boy into the world. At 6 pounds and 10 ounces, 19 inches, and a shade that would be best defined as mauve, our son, a few weeks early, took his first breaths of this world’s air.

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

I don’t know if I believe in love at first site, but I will tell you that there is nothing quite like holding your newborn child for the first time. The sight of a tiny person made up of your own flesh and blood provides a rush of emotional adrenaline that is the perfect mix of exhaustion, joy, and heart explosion. We still hadn’t picked a name, but after he was taken away to be cleaned up, Brett and I settled on George Ellis Wood. George, a nod to Brett’s grandfather and uncle, and Ellis, which means “mouthpiece of God” and “the Lord is my God”, was chosen after a few minutes of deliberation, and week into his golden little life, I will tell you I couldn’t be more excited about our choice.

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

George experienced some difficulty breathing almost immediately, and after a few hours of observation by our pediatrician, it was decided that he would require treatment at a facility about an hour away. After being held by his mama only once, George was whisked away by ambulance and I was left to recover in my original hospital room, completely overwhelmed by the day’s events.

Fast forward to today.

George is still in the NICU, but he’s doing splendidly and getting closer and closer to breathing on his own. I’ve held him three times since then (4 if you count holding hands), and every time feels like the first.

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

When unexpected things happen, it’s easy for me to become overwhelmed, ask “why?”, and to question God’s sovereignty in my life. This past week, however, has been a uniquely different experience.  While overwhelming at times, we have been supported and covered in prayer in a way unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. We’ve been on the receiving end of hundreds of calls, texts, and hugs, and I feel so at ease and peace with leaving our son in the care of his medical team. I’ve seen answers to prayers and evidence of God’s action over the course of this week, and instead of “why?”, I’m just really grateful to have a little baby’s hand to hold. We’re not home yet, but baby George is doing well and that’s all I could hope for at this point. If you have been joining us in prayer- thank you. You have given us the greatest gift you have to give. 

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

Also, can we take about these photos? My best friend, Jesse, of Dreamtown Co. flew to Alabama the morning I went into labor. Friends that will cancel their entire week of plans to hold your sweaty hand while you push a baby out are a rare commodity. She’s a terrific lady with photography skills to boot, so check out her site here. Also, as you can see, she’s a babe. 

Birth Photography Dreamtown Co

And ok, I know what you’re thinking: “Um, hello, where’s the food? Where’s the recipes” 

I couldn’t agree more.

Honey Oat Bread Recipe

Today I’m sharing with you my recipe for honey oat bread. As luck would have it, I baked several loaves to store in our deep freezer just three days before baby George decided to wiggle in to the world. It’s a good thing too because we would all be lost without this bread. Jesse, who stayed at my house while I was in overseeing George at the hospital, texted me asking, “WHERE IS THIS BREAD FROM, I’VE EATEN THREE SLICES ALREADY?!”

I was proud to tell her that I was the one responsible.

Honey Oat Bread Recipe

In creating honey oat bread, I started with my no fail whole wheat sandwich bread recipe and then modified it a bit to include oats and honey. It’s not 100% whole wheat, but the extra gluten from the all purpose flour makes it soft and chewy which is perfect at breakfast time under a shmear of peanut butter or jam. I highly recommend this bread toasted with salted butter and honey or a little cinnamon and sugar. I also highly recommend making multiple loaves at a time and cramming them in your freezer in case you happen to go into labor unexpectedly. 

Honey Oat Bread Recipe

Please continue to love on little George. It makes my mama heart glow. And happy bread baking!

 

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Honey Oat Bread

Honey Oat Bread Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple, delicious, and healthy homemade sandwich bread that is sweetened with honey and has old fashioned or quick oats in there. It's a soft, white, chewy bread that makes two loaves. Find the recipe for this simple yeast bread on thewoodandspoon.com

This honey oat bread is light, fluffy, and slightly chewy. I recommend toasting and serving warm!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 90
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup warm (but not too hot) water
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 1/4 cup milk (I use 2%), room temperature
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons canola/vegetable oil
  • 1 cup quick cook oats, plus more for sprinkling on top of loaf
  • 5 (or more) cups of all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons cream

Instructions

  1. Pour water in a large bowl, or the bowl of a stand mixer,and sprinkle the yeast over top of it. Allow to sit for 5 minutes while yeast dissolves and activates.
  2. Meanwhile, combine milk, honey, and oil. Stir the wet ingredients into the activated yeast water and stir until combined.
  3. Add the oats, 1 cup of the flour, and the salt and stir until loosely combined. Add the remaining 4 cups of flour and mix until combined.
  4. Using the dough hook attachment on the stand mixer, or by hand, knead the shaggy dough together until a soft ball of dough is formed. Add additional flour 2 tablespoons at a time if it remains too wet, however, keep in mind, this is a fairly moist bread dough. When finished, it should feel tacky to the touch and won’t be completely smooth because of the oats. I knead for 3-4 minutes on low speed on my stand mixer.
  5. Place dough ball into a large, lightly greased bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow it to rise in a slightly warm environment for about 1-1/2 hours, or until the dough has doubled in size.
  6. Once doubled, dump dough out on to a floured surface and separate in to two equal pieces. Form dough into a loaf shape and place each piece in its own lightly greased bread pan (8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ x 2 3/4″).
  7. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Cover bread pans with dough inside with plastic wrap and allow to rise for a second time, about 1- 1-1/2 hours, or just until the dome of the bread has risen one inch above the lip of the pan.
  8. Lightly brush the top of bread with cream and sprinkle with remaining oats. Place in the oven and immediately lower heat to 375 degrees. Bake in the oven for approximately 30 minutes, or until the top is a light golden brown.
  9. Allow to cool for ten minutes inside the pan on a cooling rack, then remove from pan and cool completely before packaging.

Oatmeal Cookies

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are simple stuffed oatmeal cookies loaded with your choice of ingredients. Chunky oats, chocolate chips. dried fruits like raisins and cranberries, or even candies, toffee, or nuts! These oatmeal cookies are simple to make, buttery, and full of brown sugar goodness. You can freeze as well! Find the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

There’s something about eating oatmeal cookies that makes me think of breakfast. Maybe it’s years of oatmeal with sliced banana and honey for breakfast or dried fruit and oat topped yogurt snacks, but I tell ya what- oatmeal cookies have got me thinking, “man, this dessert feels pretty healthy.”

Yeah, yeah. I know. Wishful thinking. You can’t blame me for trying.

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies

I have yet to come to a firm stance on my oatmeal cookie preference. Thin and crisp? Puffy and cake-like? Buttery, crisp edges with a chewy center? The jury is still out on this one, but one thing I do know is that I like my oatmeal cookies fully loaded. If someone created the cookie equivalent to the everything bagel, I would buy and consume them er’ryday. Dried fruit, chocolate chips, a browned butter drizzle… really, just feel free to have your way with my oatmeal cookie. The more the merrier.

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies

These cookies are a toned down version of my ultimate fantasy, maxed out, loaded oatmeal cookie, mainly because I know my husband would be ultra-grossed out by any cookie with a dried fruit to cookie dough ratio any greater than 1:1, but this oatmeal cookie also boasts a super chewy texture alllllll the way through, and enough of a variety of add-ins that nearly every bite is a bit different. They’re also super adaptable in that you can mix and match your add-ins according to your preferences. Don’t like dried cranberries? No problem- try apricots! Want to pack a nutty punch? Sub in chopped pecans or peanut butter chips! This oatmeal cookie is pretty much your oyster, so do as you please with it.

I hope you enjoy this recipe! If anyone has any extra luck with a certain flavor combo, give me the dirty deets below in the comments!

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies

 

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Oatmeal Cookies

Loaded Oatmeal Cookies Recipe by The Wood and Spoon Blog by Kate Wood. These are simple stuffed oatmeal cookies loaded with your choice of ingredients. Chunky oats, chocolate chips. dried fruits like raisins and cranberries, or even candies, toffee, or nuts! These oatmeal cookies are simple to make, buttery, and full of brown sugar goodness. You can freeze as well! Find the recipe on thewoodandspoon.com

Chewy oatmeal cookies filled to brim with craisins, toffee bits, and chocolate chips.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 24 1x
Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
  • 1 1/2 cups packed light brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 3/4 cups quick-cook oatmeal
  • 1 cup craisins
  • 1 cup toffee bits
  • 11/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Cream butter and sugar together until light and smooth, about 4-5 minutes.
  3. Add eggs and beat again for another 4 minutes, scraping the bowl as needed.
  4. Add buttermilk and vanilla, mixing until combined and scraping the bowl as needed.
  5. Combine the flour, baking soda, salt, cornstarch, baking powder, and oatmeal in a separate bowl. Add to the butter mixture and stir on low until just barely combined. Do not over-mix.
  6. Fold in the craisins, chocolate chips, and toffee bits until well combined.
  7. Using an ice cream scoop, portion out 3 tablespoon mounds of dough on to a heavy-bottomed baking sheet. Keep dough balls at least 2 inches apart.
  8. Place in the freezer to chill for 3-4 minutes. Alternatively, you can put the entirety of the dough in the refrigerator to chill for 2 hours.
  9. Bake in the oven for 12-15 minutes, or until golden brown on the outside and barely set on the inside.
  10. Allow to cool for 2-3 minutes on the cookie sheet and then transfer to a cooling rack.

Notes

  • This is a highly adaptable recipe. You can sub in your favorite chocolate, nuts, and dried fruit easily.
  • Be sure butter is room temp and not too soft or hard out of the refrigerator.