pear

Pear Almond Cake

Pear Almond Cake by Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pound cake bundt cake with a streusel crumb topping that is loaded with fresh sweetened pear fruit and almond flavor. The coffee cake makes a great breakfast or dessert treat or snack for your holiday winter tables. Learn more about the recipe and how to prep this simple cake that can be garnished with pomegranate seeds on thewoodandspoon.com

Now that Thanksgiving is behind us, I’m going full-on Christmas mode. Granted, my house has been decorated for two weeks, we’ve already made a gingerbread house, and the Jonas Brothers’ Christmas single has been played like 342 times, but still. Our last Christmas was hectic and abrupt because of our move, and I’ve been determined to make the biggest deal out of it this year (#momlife). To get things going in a festive direction, I’m sharing this pear almond cake today! Let’s talk all about it.

Pear Almond Cake by Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pound cake bundt cake with a streusel crumb topping that is loaded with fresh sweetened pear fruit and almond flavor. The coffee cake makes a great breakfast or dessert treat or snack for your holiday winter tables. Learn more about the recipe and how to prep this simple cake that can be garnished with pomegranate seeds on thewoodandspoon.com

This is a one-bowl butter and sour cream-based bundt cake that is loaded with chopped pears and a sweet streusel and glaze. Cakes like this always read coffee cake to me, which basically means it’s an appropriate choice for breakfast, brunch, snack, or dessert. Is there anything better than a green light for dessert all day long? NOPE. To make it, simply cream butter and sugar in a large bowl before adding eggs and extract. The dry ingredients come next and are alternated in with sour cream which bulks up this cake and adds moisture. Finally, the chopped pears are folded in and the cake is ready to be topped with streusel.

Pear Almond Cake by Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pound cake bundt cake with a streusel crumb topping that is loaded with fresh sweetened pear fruit and almond flavor. The coffee cake makes a great breakfast or dessert treat or snack for your holiday winter tables. Learn more about the recipe and how to prep this simple cake that can be garnished with pomegranate seeds on thewoodandspoon.com

This pear almond cake is seriously dense and hearty. The pears help to offset sweetness and add a ton of moisture. The end product is a cake that is super fruit-foward and great for munching on all day long. I’m sharing today’s recipe over on Stemilt’s blog! Stemilt is is a leading Washington state grower, packer, and shipper of fruit including apples, pears, cherries, and more. Each quarter, I’ve been developing recipes for their blog using their best in-season fruits. This month, I got my hands on their Anjou Pears and thought a sweet and simple pear almond cake would make for a delicious treat to enjoy all season long. Head to their site at the link below to read all about it and give the recipe a try! I can’t wait to hear what you think. Have a great week and tune in later this week for a second (!!!) recipe!

Pear Almond Cake by Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pound cake bundt cake with a streusel crumb topping that is loaded with fresh sweetened pear fruit and almond flavor. The coffee cake makes a great breakfast or dessert treat or snack for your holiday winter tables. Learn more about the recipe and how to prep this simple cake that can be garnished with pomegranate seeds on thewoodandspoon.comPear Almond Cake by Wood and Spoon blog by Kate Wood. This is a simple pound cake bundt cake with a streusel crumb topping that is loaded with fresh sweetened pear fruit and almond flavor. The coffee cake makes a great breakfast or dessert treat or snack for your holiday winter tables. Learn more about the recipe and how to prep this simple cake that can be garnished with pomegranate seeds on thewoodandspoon.com

Click here for the pear almond cake recipe!

If you like this pear almond cake you should try:

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Poached Pear Trifles

Coffee Cake Muffins

Honey Cake with Figs and Whipped Cream Cheese

Apple Crumb Cake

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Is it just me, or is it way too easy to come home from vacation straight up exhausted? Brett and I spent this past weekend up north, traveling a few days in Boston and Martha’s Vineyard. It was my first time to the area, and I’m excited to report that both were equally charming in their own unique way. Per custom, I have a new recipe to share with you this week as well as the run down on everything we ate, drank, and saw during our time in the northeast.  Stay tuned for the brown butter pear tart and read on for the who, what, and where details of our trip!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Where We Stayed:

What started as a trip to Martha’s Vineyard turned into a two part vacay: phase one spent enjoying the big city historical scene of Boston and phase two spent relaxing in the off-season quiet of Martha’s Vineyard. After a few recommendations from friends, we opted for a spunky modern hotel option in Boston, The Envoy, and a quaint bed and breakfast on the vineyard, the Hob Knob. Both were well suited to their respective locations and felt right for our time there. I’d definitely recommend both if you’re looking for a sure thing on your next visit!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Ate:

What DIDN’T we eat might be the more appropriate question. This was a non-stop parade of food, fine restaurants, and pastries. I was excited to find many delicious lunch and dinner options in Boston, but found the bakery scene proved to be rather lackluster. There was, however, no shortage of amazing cocktails and pubs, and we also loved checking out the food truck scene at Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Although we arrived in Martha’s Vineyard in what we were told was the last big week before the island shut down for the season, we still found many of the places recommended by friends to be open! Our palates were equally happy to learn that the Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival was taking place while we were there, and Brett and I were lucky enough to snag tickets to the main tasting on Saturday afternoon. Dozens of wine purveyors and chefs from the Northeast flocked to the island to serve up their goods, and it was a ball. There’s nothing like day drinking and bite-sized appetizers to help you make friends in a new place. If you’re ever in the region during the festival, I highly recommend giving it a try! See below for the full list of local restaurants we visited during our time away.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Boston Recommendations:

Fox and the Knife

An enoteca and restaurant by James Beard Award-winning chef Karen Akunowicz. We enjoyed delicious handmade pastas and Italian liquors there.

The Longfellow Bar

A neighborhood bar and restaurant in Cambridge offering shared plates with exciting flavors.

Shojo

Modern Asian cuisine in the heart of Boston’s Chinatown.

Pammy’s

New American bites in a modernized trattoria setting.

Tatte Bakery

With a number of locations across Boston, Tatte offers a variety of delicious baked goods, coffees, and lunch options in a seriously aesthetic atmosphere.

Sofra Bakery

Middle Eastern inspired baked goods. Check out their online schedule for baking classes!

The Food Trucks at Rose Kennedy Greenway

Martha’s Vineyard Recommendations:

Alchemy

Creative New American fare in a classic dining room setting.

The Port Hunter

A raw bar and approachable new American food are offered in this casual setting.

Back Door Donuts

Delicious donuts and baked goods in a carry-out setting.

State Road

New American cuisine in a cozy tavern setting.

Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Did:

Although there’s loads to do in both Boston and Martha’s Vineyard, both areas are spread out in such a way that they weren’t entirely walkable. Luckily, Uber and Lyft were both readily available, and we found it was simple to catch a ride to wherever we wanted to be. Boston is brimming with loads of historical sites and museums, so we spent a good bit of time checking out walking tours and super old buildings. Brett was eager to grab a beer at the Beantown Pub, a bar across the street from Samuel Adams’ gravesite, so that he could “drink a cold Sam Adams while looking at a cold Sam Adams.”( I’ll pause for eye rolling.) Per recommendation from friends, we took a day trip to Cambridge to get a glimpse of Harvard University. The school is spread out all over the city, but it was intriguing just to poke around and eavesdrop on random conversations. The two gentlemen sitting beside me at lunch were having an in depth conversation about hydrogen atoms, and this Dorothy immediately knew she wasn’t in Kansas anymore.

Although the landscape of Martha’s Vineyard is primarily suited for summertime activities, I found the chilly, autumnal version of the island peaceful and charming. We spent most of our time nosing through Mom and Pop stores in downtown Edgartown and taking in the coastal views. If you’re at all interested in fishing or water sports, I’d highly recommend checking out boat rentals as that would be a great way to spend a weekend there.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Let me start by saying that I adore this tart. Months ago, I ran across a photo of a beautiful layered pear pie. It had, what appeared to be, a phyllo crust filled with thin slices of pears overlapping on one another in a concentric fashion. The crust was browned and flaked and the filling was speckled with fresh pomegranate seeds. Although I wasn’t able to find a recipe for the creation, I decided I needed to make a dessert with a similar look. The brainstorming began.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Here’s what I ended up with: a brown butter pear tart. A simple, press-in sweet pastry dough is filled with a thin layer of brown butter custard and a mountain of fresh sliced red Anjou pears. Upon baking, the pears release their juice and soften, the flavors from the fruit quietly melting into the custard underneath it. The pastry crust, albeit simple, is the perfect vehicle for the subtle flavors, as it offers texture and sweetness while still allowing the filling to sing.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart features Kerrygold unsalted butter in two fashions: first, cold chunks of butter are cut into the dry ingredients to create a tender and mildly buttery shell. The dough for the tart crust is so ridiculously delicious that I found myself eating almost as much as I pressed into the pan. Kerrygold butter is also found throughout the brown butter custard. If you need a few pointers on browning butter, please check out my how-to post here.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart is without a doubt one of the most unassuming and delightful holiday desserts I’ve made in a long time. Although we’re still a couple of days away from the holiday season, it’s never too early to get planning, and I really think you need to consider this tart in the lineup of Thanksgiving and Christmas treats. Give it a try and let me know what you think! Many thanks to Kerrygold for sponsoring this post, and thanks to you all for supporting brands that make Wood & Spoon possible. Happy baking!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

 

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Brown Butter Pear Tart

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter peat tart has a sweet pastry crust, a brown butter custard, and a layered pear filling.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pastry dough:

  • 11/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup cold unsalted butter
  • 1 large egg yolk, white reserved
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons of ice water, plus more as needed

For the filling:

  • ½ cup unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 23 large red pears, halved, cored, and sliced in 1/8” slices
  • Pomegranate seeds, about ½ cup
  • Toasted walnuts, if desired

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Pulse in the butter until it resembles pea-sized crumbs. Don’t over-process. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolkd and vanilla. Pulse the egg yolk mixture into the flour just until combined. Add the water and pulse to combine. Don’t process it to the point of it coming together into a dough. The mixture should still be shaggy but should clump together when you squeeze a bit of the mixture together in between your fingers. If it’s still dry add another teaspoon or so of ice water and then pulse to combine. Dump the mixture out onto a clean work surface and bring the dough together into a ball. Flatten it out into a disk, wrap it is plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes but preferably 2 hours.
  2. When ready to prepare your pie, roll the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Roll out the dough to fit into a 9” tart pan with a removable bottom. The dough should be about 2” larger than the pan on all sides. Roll the dough onto your lightly floured rolling pin and gently unroll it into your tart pan. Gently fit the dough into the edges of your pan and use a paring knife or kitchen scissors to trim any dough that extends over 1” the lip of the pan. Press the dough gently into the sides of the pan and use any leftover dough to reinforce the sides where needed. Put the pan in the freezer to set up for 30 minutes while you preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  3. When ready to bake, prick the bottom of the tart dough with a fork a few times. Use a sheet of parchment to line the pastry dough inside the pan and f ill the tart pan with pie weights (you can also use dried beans or dried rice). Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes then remove the parchment and weights from the tart pan. Gently brush the crust with a thin layer of the egg white and bake for 5 more minutes. In the meantime, prep your filling.
  4. Cube the butter and add to a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan to being browning it. Place the pan on medium heat and stir gently with a whisk regularly to allow the butter to melt evenly. Once melted, keep stirring regularly to allow the butter to cook, sizzle, and foam evenly. You’ll begin to notice golden flecks appearing at the bottom of the pan and the butter will become fragrant. When there are amber-colored flecks throughout the butter mixture your butter is browned! Don’t let it burn! Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into a heat-safe mixing bowl. Stir in the sugar. Stir in the egg and vanilla extract and then fold in the flour. Pour the mixture into the par-baked pastry shell and spread to even it out. Cover the filling in a layer of fanned pear slices. Keep the slices in tight on one another to prevent the filling from baking up over on top of them too much. Bake in the preheated oven for an additional 35-40 minutes or until the crust is golden and the filling it cooked underneath. The pears shouldn’t jiggle on top of the pie when the pie is done. Allow to cool serve with a sprinkle pomegranate seeds and toasted walnuts. Enjoy!

Boston

Is it just me, or is it way too easy to come home from vacation straight-up exhausted? Brett and I spent this past weekend up north, traveling a few days through Boston and Martha’s Vineyard. It was my first time to the area, and I’m excited to report that both were equally charming in their own unique way. Per custom, I have a new recipe to share with you this week as well as the run down on everything we ate, drank, and saw during our time in the northeast.  Stay tuned for the brown butter pear tart and read on for the who, what, and where details of our trip!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Where We Stayed:

What started as a trip to Martha’s Vineyard turned into a two part vacay: phase one spent enjoying the big city historical scene of Boston and phase two spent relaxing in the off-season quiet of Martha’s Vineyard. After a few recommendations from friends, we opted for a spunky modern hotel option in Boston, The Envoy, and a quaint bed and breakfast on the vineyard, the Hob Knob. Both were well suited to their respective locations and felt right for our time there. I’d definitely recommend both if you’re looking for a sure thing on your next visit!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Ate:

What DIDN’T we eat might be the more appropriate question. This was a non-stop parade of food, fine restaurants, and pastries. I was excited to find tons of delicious lunch and dinner options in Boston, as well as desserts galore. There was no shortage of amazing cocktails and pubs, and we also loved checking out the food truck scene at Rose Kennedy Greenway.

Although we arrived in Martha’s Vineyard in what we were told was the last big week before the island shut down for the season, we still found many of the places recommended by friends to be open! Our palates were equally happy to learn that the Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival was taking place while we were there, and Brett and I were lucky enough to snag tickets to the main tasting on Saturday afternoon. Dozens of wine purveyors and chefs from the Northeast flocked to the island to serve up their goods, and it was a ball. There’s nothing like day drinking and bite-sized appetizers to help you make friends in a new place. If you’re ever in the region during the festival, I highly recommend giving it a try! See below for the full list of local restaurants we visited during our time away.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Boston Recommendations:

Fox and the Knife
An enoteca and restaurant by James Beard Award-winning chef Karen Akunowicz. We enjoyed delicious handmade pastas and Italian liquors there.
The Longfellow Bar
A neighborhood bar and restaurant in Cambridge offering shared plates with exciting flavors.
Shojo
Modern Asian cuisine in the heart of Boston’s Chinatown.
Pammy’s
New American bites in a modernized trattoria setting.
Tatte Bakery
With a number of locations across Boston, Tatte offers a variety of delicious baked goods, coffees, and lunch options in a seriously aesthetic atmosphere.
Sofra Bakery
Middle Eastern inspired baked goods. Check out their online schedule for baking classes!
Flour Baker and Cafe
This chain of bakeries is run by the extraordinary Joanne Change- a must visit!
The Food Trucks at Rose Kennedy Greenway

Martha’s Vineyard Recommendations:

Alchemy
Creative New American fare in a classic dining room setting.
The Port Hunter
A raw bar and approachable new American food are offered in this casual setting.
Back Door Donuts
Delicious donuts and baked goods in a carry-out setting.
State Road
New American cuisine in a cozy tavern setting.
Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

What We Did:

Although there’s loads to do in both Boston and Martha’s Vineyard, both areas are spread out in such a way that they weren’t entirely walkable. Luckily, Uber and Lyft were both readily available, and we found it was simple to catch a ride to wherever we wanted to be. Boston is brimming with loads of historical sites and museums, so we spent a good bit of time checking out walking tours and super old buildings. Brett was eager to grab a beer at the Beantown Pub, a bar across the street from Samuel Adams’ gravesite, so that he could “drink a cold Sam Adams while looking at a cold Sam Adams.”( I’ll pause for eye rolling.) Per recommendation from friends, we took a day trip to Cambridge to get a glimpse of Harvard University. The school is spread out all over the city, but it was intriguing just to poke around and eavesdrop on random conversations. The two gentlemen sitting beside me at lunch were having an in depth conversation about hydrogen atoms, and this Dorothy immediately knew she wasn’t in Kansas anymore.

Although the landscape of Martha’s Vineyard is primarily suited for summertime activities, I found the chilly, autumnal version of the island peaceful and charming. We spent most of our time nosing through Mom and Pop stores in downtown Edgartown and taking in the coastal views. If you’re at all interested in fishing or water sports, I’d highly recommend checking out boat rentals as that would be a great way to spend a weekend there.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Let me start by saying that I adore this tart. Months ago, I ran across a photo of a beautiful layered pear pie. It had, what appeared to be, a phyllo crust filled with thin slices of pears overlapping on one another in a concentric fashion. The crust was browned and flaked and the filling was speckled with fresh pomegranate seeds. Although I wasn’t able to find a recipe for the creation, I decided I needed to make a dessert with a similar look. The brainstorming began.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Here’s what I ended up with: a brown butter pear tart. A simple, press-in sweet pastry dough is filled with a thin layer of brown butter custard and a mountain of fresh sliced red Anjou pears. Upon baking, the pears release their juice and soften, the flavors from the fruit quietly melting into the custard underneath it. The pastry crust, albeit simple, is the perfect vehicle for the subtle flavors, as it offers texture and sweetness while still allowing the filling to sing.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart features Kerrygold unsalted butter in two fashions: first, cold chunks of butter are cut into the dry ingredients to create a tender and mildly buttery shell. The dough for the tart crust is so ridiculously delicious that I found myself eating almost as much as I pressed into the pan. Kerrygold butter is also found throughout the brown butter custard. If you need a few pointers on browning butter, please check out my how-to post here.

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter pear tart is without a doubt one of the most unassuming and delightful holiday desserts I’ve made in a long time. Although we’re still a couple of days away from the holiday season, it’s never too early to get planning, and I really think you need to consider this tart in the lineup of Thanksgiving and Christmas treats. Give it a try and let me know what you think! Many thanks to Kerrygold for sponsoring this post, and thanks to you all for supporting brands that make Wood & Spoon possible. Happy baking!

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

Print

Brown Butter Pear Tart

Brown Butter Pear Tart and our time in Boston and Martha's Vineyard. This is the recipe for a sweet pastry crust tart filled with brown butter custard and layered red pears. Fresh pomegranate top the pretty holiday dessert for a crowd. Can be served at room temperature and made ahead. Read more about our trip to new England coast to Martha's Vineyard and historical Boston with this foodie guide of what to eat and see and do and where to stay. by wood and spoon blog by Kate Wood

This brown butter peat tart has a sweet pastry crust, a brown butter custard, and a layered pear filling.

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 9 1x
  • Category: Dessert
Scale

Ingredients

For the pastry dough:

  • 11/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup cold unsalted butter
  • 1 large egg yolk, white reserved
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons of ice water, plus more as needed

For the filling:

  • ½ cup unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 23 large red pears, halved, cored, and sliced in 1/8” slices
  • Pomegranate seeds, about ½ cup
  • Toasted walnuts, if desired

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Pulse in the butter until it resembles pea-sized crumbs. Don’t over-process. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolkd and vanilla. Pulse the egg yolk mixture into the flour just until combined. Add the water and pulse to combine. Don’t process it to the point of it coming together into a dough. The mixture should still be shaggy but should clump together when you squeeze a bit of the mixture together in between your fingers. If it’s still dry add another teaspoon or so of ice water and then pulse to combine. Dump the mixture out onto a clean work surface and bring the dough together into a ball. Flatten it out into a disk, wrap it is plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes but preferably 2 hours.
  2. When ready to prepare your pie, roll the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Roll out the dough to fit into a 9” tart pan with a removable bottom. The dough should be about 2” larger than the pan on all sides. Roll the dough onto your lightly floured rolling pin and gently unroll it into your tart pan. Gently fit the dough into the edges of your pan and use a paring knife or kitchen scissors to trim any dough that extends over 1” the lip of the pan. Press the dough gently into the sides of the pan and use any leftover dough to reinforce the sides where needed. Put the pan in the freezer to set up for 30 minutes while you preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  3. When ready to bake, prick the bottom of the tart dough with a fork a few times. Use a sheet of parchment to line the pastry dough inside the pan and f ill the tart pan with pie weights (you can also use dried beans or dried rice). Bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes then remove the parchment and weights from the tart pan. Gently brush the crust with a thin layer of the egg white and bake for 5 more minutes. In the meantime, prep your filling.
  4. Cube the butter and add to a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan to being browning it. Place the pan on medium heat and stir gently with a whisk regularly to allow the butter to melt evenly. Once melted, keep stirring regularly to allow the butter to cook, sizzle, and foam evenly. You’ll begin to notice golden flecks appearing at the bottom of the pan and the butter will become fragrant. When there are amber-colored flecks throughout the butter mixture your butter is browned! Don’t let it burn! Immediately remove it from the heat and pour into a heat-safe mixing bowl. Stir in the sugar. Stir in the egg and vanilla extract and then fold in the flour. Pour the mixture into the par-baked pastry shell and spread to even it out. Cover the filling in a layer of fanned pear slices. Keep the slices in tight on one another to prevent the filling from baking up over on top of them too much. Bake in the preheated oven for an additional 35-40 minutes or until the crust is golden and the filling it cooked underneath. The pears shouldn’t jiggle on top of the pie when the pie is done. Allow to cool serve with a sprinkle pomegranate seeds and toasted walnuts. Enjoy!

Poached Pear Trifles

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m slowly learning that parenting is approximately 20% trickery. Whether it be with potty training, getting dressed for school, or even coercing them into (or out of) the bath, I often find myself leaning on trickery to get my kids to do what I want them to do. Awesome parenting, right? 

Take for instance eating new foods. The current battle royale in our home is convincing my kids that they will like a food they’ve never tried before. Now don’t be fooled into thinking this issue lies specifically with fruits, vegetable, or other decidedly “healthy” foods. No, it seems that when my children come under the notion that they will not like a food they will simply refuse to eat it, often with little reason at all. This morning, Aimee decided she didn’t want bagels with cream cheese and jam. Yes, you read right- bagels.  She took one look at it and had a near meltdown. Did I know she would like the bagel? Yes. Was I sure it would take only one bite for her to fall in love with those chewy rounds of bread? For sure. But you try convincing a strong-willed 4-year-old of that. Impossible.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

In some respect, I understand. I have tricked them into eating out of the ordinary dishes before. There was the sushi incident of 2015 and that one time I tried to pass off spaghetti squash as actual noodles. No amount of butter can turn cauliflower into real mashed potatoes, and I know my kids don’t believe me when I tell them their plain Greek yogurt is the same thing their friends eat out of plastic tubes at school. So in a way, experience has taught them they can’t take me at my word. Again, awesome parenting, right?

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

If we’re being completely transparent, there’s a lot of foods I simply won’t spring for either. The best example I can come up with right now is when people try to pass off non-dessert items as dessert. Like, a cheese plate? Not dessert. Diet wafers? I’d rather not. When I indulge in dessert I really want it to satisfy my sweet tooth in a special and indulgent way, so even things like fruit, for me, don’t work as a dessert. That is, until these poached pear trifles. 

A pear, on it’s own, wouldn’t really send me over the edge into dessert bliss. But what if that pear had been poached in cinnamon and red wine? What if they were layered with perfect, buttery French madeleines and a creamy whipped filling? What if the whole thing was topped with sugary-spiced nuts? TOTALLY DESSERT.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

I’m sharing today’s recipe for these poached pear trifled with Donsuemor, the makers of the most delicious French madeleines. Made with the very best ingredients and no preservatives or artificial coloring, Donsuemor’s madeleines are dessert all on their own but extra-special when layered in a festive holiday dish like this. Although I ordered online, you can pick these little guys up at Costco and the rest of your desserts are history! You can use them in place of lady fingers in tiramisu, serve them alongside bowls of homemade ice cream, or even dip them in melted chocolate and crushed candies for a semi-homemade treat. I love from-scratch desserts as much as the next person, but in a treat like these poached pear trifles, it’s worth relying on a trustworthy brand to do some legwork for you.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

To make these poached pear trifles we start with the pears. Peeled and quartered pears are cooked in a red wine, sugar, and cinnamon mixture until the pears are soft to a fork. Throw in a handful of fresh cranberries to cook until soft and then remove the fruit to cool. Let the wine mixture continue to cook until slightly reduced and thickened. In the meantime you can prep the filling! I’ve made this filling both with mascarpone and cream cheese, so you can use whichever you prefer. Mascarpone cheese definitely changes the texture of the filling in a way that I didn’t prefer as much as the cream cheese, but you can make that choice for yourself. Simply whip with heavy cream until the mixture is lightly fluffed. Orange zest is added for just a smidge of flavor too.

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

Both the pears and the cream can be made slightly in advance and layered in with the madeleines just before serving. Add some wine syrup to the bottom of a glass with some of the fruit, top with a madeleine and cream, and then repeat the process again. I finished the dish off with fresh pomegranate and candied nuts, but this is entirely optional. These poached pear trifles just scream FANCY and are perfect for this holiday time of year. I hope you’ll give them a try in the coming weeks and check out Donsuemor’s site for more info on these yummy little bites.

Wish me luck in the “tricking your toddler” department. So far I’m losing that battle, but I think there’s still plenty of hope. Happy Friday to you all and happy baking!

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

This post is sponsored by Donsuemor. Thank you for supporting brands that make Wood and Spoon possible.

If you like these poached pear trifles you should check out:

Cookie Butter Pretzel Mousse

Peppermint Bark Icebox Cake

Strawberry Pretzel Tart

Strawberry Shortcakes

 

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Poached Pear Trifles

Poached Pear Trifles with wine pears, cranberries, pomegranate, Donsuemor madeleines and a creamy whipped filling. These trifles are sweet and tangy and boozy all at the same time. First up are red wine and cinnamon poached pears and cranberries that are cooked until soft. These are layered with a cream cheese or mascarpone whipped filling scented with orange zest, French madeleines, and more fresh fruit! Make these treats for a fancy holiday gathering. You can make large trifles or smaller individual ones. Recipe on thewoodandspoon.com by Kate Wood

These poached pear trifles feature red-wine soaked fruit, a fluffy and tangy whipped filling, and buttery homemade madeleines. Adapt the recipe to make anywhere from 4 to 8 servings!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 60
  • Total Time: 90
  • Yield: 8 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the pears:

  • 1 bottle mild red wine (I used a red table blend)
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 21/2 pounds of pears (I used Barletts), peeled, cored, and quartered
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ¾ cup fresh cranberries (optional)

For the cream:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Additional items:

  • 6 French Madeleines (I use Donsuemor)
  • ½ cup pomegranate seeds
  • Candied walnuts, pecans, or almonds, if desired

Instructions

To prepare the pears:

  1. Combine the wine and sugar in a large saucepan over medium heat, and, while stirring, allow the sugar to dissolve into the wine. Once dissolved, add the pears and cinnamon stick and simmer over medium-low heat for 25-30 minutes until soft to a fork. Time will differ depending on the ripeness of your fruit. Once done, carefully remove the fruit and continue cooking the wine to reduce it another 30 minutes. If you wish to use cranberries, add them in the last 5-10 minutes of cooking. The berries will burst and lose their shape the longer they cook, so I recommend only cooking up to 10 minutes. Allow the mixture to cool if you’re making in advance, otherwise allow it to cool to taste.

To prepare the cream:

  1. Cream the cream cheese and sugar on medium speed in a large bowl until combined. Add the heavy whipping cream and beat on medium speed until thick enough to hold its shape. Add in the orange zest and vanilla and mix just to combine. Set aside in fridge until you’re ready to assemble your trifles.

To assemble the trifles:

  1. Determine if you’d like to make 8 smaller (Weck Jar Sized) or 4 larger (as in the glasses shown here) trifles. If your pear mixture has been chilled, feel free to rewarm to a comfortable temperature briefly. Cut the pears into large chunks if you wish the trifles to be eaten easily with a spoon and stir them in with the cranberries and wine. Spoon a small layer of this mixture into the bottom of each dish and dollop a layer of cream on top of that. Pinch off a few pieces of madeleine to place on top of the cream and repeat the layering of the wine and pears with the cream once more. Finish each trifle with a half of a madeleine coming out of the trifle and garnish with pomegranate seeds, nuts, and additional cranberries and pears, if desired. Serve immediately. If you wish to make these ahead you can serve them cold.

Notes

  • You can use mascarpone cheese in place of the cream cheese although the texture will change.

Cranberry Pear Mini Pop-Tarts

cranberry pear mini pop tarts recipe by the wood and spoon blog by kate wood. this recipe makes mini hand pie type pop-tarts filled with bits of pears (or apples!) and cranberries. They are baked in the oven until golden and flaky and the whole thing gets topped with a powdered sugar glaze. This is a great way to use leftover pie crusts or to make individual pie crusts. Find the recipe at thewoodandspoon.com

If you follow me on Instagram or have known me for longer than ten minutes, you have probably gathered that I have a bit of a sweet tooth. God bless decent genetics and enough spare time to exercise occasionally because otherwise, I’d be in deep. 

Surprisingly though, I’m a bit of a health-nut//control freak when it comes to my daughter, Aimee. It’s really important to me that she eats appropriately (even if mom cheats a little every now and then daily), so she’s typically pretty limited on what she’s allowed to have. 

Truth be told, this is in part due to me not wanting to deal with a picky eater, and even more embarrassingly, because I don’t always want to share my treats. The day she learned to say the word “cookie”, I pretty much melted and knew my days of solo cookie consuming were over. She’s a girl after my own heart.

pastry dough for cranberry pear mini pop tarts

Needless to say, Aimee has not tried a lot of the foods I really loved when I was a kid. Because my diet as a kid was often a mash-up of processed food faves, I was usually the girl you wanted to make a trade with at the lunch table… and for the record, no, the leftovers from your mom’s mystery meat with cream of whatever soup sauce was NOT a plausible trade for my pizza Lunchable. Good try, though. 

One of my faves growing up was Pop-Tarts. If we’re being honest, I still probably love them, it’s just been a minute since I’ve ventured to that region of the grocery store. After becoming confident with my favorite pie crust recipe, I decided it was time to take a stab at the illusive Pop-Tart.

Ya’ll.

Homemade Pop-Tarts, or this recipe at least, is essentially a mini, personal-sized pie with DOUBLE CRUST. [Drops Mic]

cranberry pear mini pop tarts

Hot out of the oven, these teeny pie bites have a buttery, flaky crust, and tart fruit filling that is as diverse as it is easy to make. If you want to make strawberry filling… well, make strawberry filling! If you’re feeling blueberry and lemon… bake away! Quite often I will use stocked up preserves from the summer and spread those on to the pastry- super simple. No one will ever guess it’s just jam.

We usually have a good variety of pears at our grocery store in the winter months, so I opted to try out a pear and cranberry variety. My house smelled like a winter wonderland while these were in the oven, and I really think this flavor combination makes for a grown-up, sophisticated way of saying, “um, yes, I still love Pop-Tarts.”

Both the pastry and the filling can be made in advance and they require very little active kitchen time. In a pinch, you could always try refrigerated pie crust from the grocery store, but you have my word that the homemade route is the best way to go.

Give these tarts a try and let me know what you think! If you discover a new flavor that is next level, please fill me in.

Happy baking! Oh, and for the record… I won’t be sharing these with Aimee.

cranberry pear mini pop tarts

 

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Cranberry Pear Mini Pop- Tarts

An updated take on the classic pastry, these cranberry-pear mini pop-tarts include a flaky crust and tart cranberry pear filling that is delicious treat to serve to kids and adults alike!

  • Author: Kate Wood
  • Prep Time: 45
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the filling

  • 1 Tbsp. butter
  • 1 cup finely diced pear (I used Bartlett but any firm pear for baking will do)
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 tsp. corn starch
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp salt

For the pastry

  • 2 1/4 cups of all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 5 Tbsp. ice water

Instructions

To prepare the filling

  1. Melt butter in a medium saucepan.
  2. Combine all other ingredients and add to the pan with the butter. Stir frequently over medium heat until cranberries have burst and filling is thick and somewhat uniform, about 15 minutes. Allow to cool in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight.

To prepare the pastry

  1. Combine flour, salt and sugar in a medium sized bowl.
  2. Cut in butter and shortening with a pastry cutter or fork until it is the consistency of a course meal with small, pea-sized chunks of butter throughout. Add water one tablespoon at a time, tossing gently until pastry comes together in moist clumps. Divide dough in half and pat into two round, flat disks. Wrap with Saran wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.

To assemble

  1. Roll out one disk of pastry on to a floured surface to 1/4″ thickness. Using a 3″ biscuit cutter, gently cut rounds of dough. Each Pop-Tart will require two rounds (one for top and one for bottom).
  2. Place one tablespoon of cooled filling on top of half of the rounds.
  3. Top the filled rounds with a second circle of of crust and use a fork to crimp the edges. Vent the top of each rectangle by poking the top of the pastry with a fork 2-3 times. Freeze the pop tarts on the baking sheet for at least 2 hours or up to a week.
  4. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Bake the tarts, uncovered, for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown. Allow to cool and top with sifted powdered sugar or a glaze of choice.

Notes

  • I used a simple powdered sugar glaze for the pop-tarts pictured, but feel free to get creative!